black tea


Tea, including black tea, may be the healthiest beverage to order on an airplane. Some concern was raised over the aluminum content of black tea: five cups/day contain the equivalent of the maximum recommended aluminum intake. But aluminum from black tea is bound to phytonutrients and thus its bioavailability is low, so that no more than 10% can get absorbed. Black tea failed to increase aluminum blood levels, even when taken with lemon. Due to fluoride levels, we may not want to drink more than ten cups of tea a day, and adding soymilk to our tea may block the beneficial vascular effects of black tea.

White, green, oolong, and black tea all come from the same plants, but differ in how they are processed. Green tea and hibiscus have more antioxidants than black tea, but if you love black tea, Earl Grey tea may be healthier than plain black tea due to the added bergamot oil. Black tea has similar hydrating effects as water.

See also tea.

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