NutritionFacts.org

DNA damage

Smoking and meat consumption are associated with increased DNA damage. Processed meats may contain carcinogenic nitrosamines that can even be found in the vapors (smell) of frying bacon. On the other hand, plant-based diets have been associated with decreased DNA damage overall, slowed cancer growth, and possibly even slowed aging.

Specific studies have shown the possible prevention or repair capabilities of apples, almonds and grapes, carob, broccoli (see also here, here), broccoli sprouts, black pepper, dragon’s blood, and soy (edamame, tofu, tempeh). In moderation, stevia can be considered harmless, but recent studies have called into question the safety of potassium sorbate and avocados (see here, here).

Topic summary contributed by Michelle Baer.
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