NutritionFacts.org

Health Topics

  1. #
  2. A
  3. B
  4. C
  5. D
  6. E
  7. F
  8. G
  9. H
  10. I
  11. J
  12. K
  13. L
  14. M
  15. N
  16. O
  17. P
  18. Q
  19. R
  20. S
  21. T
  22. U
  23. V
  24. W
  25. X
  26. Y
  27. Z
Browse All Topics

#1 Anticancer Vegetable

There are two superfood classes of vegetables most adept at blocking human cancer cell growth in a petri dish.

November 9, 2009 |
GD Star Rating
loading...

Topics

Supplementary Info

Sources Cited

Acknowledgements

Transcript

But anyway, back to beans. In terms of nutrient density, nutrients per calorie: are beans the most nutritious class of whole foods? Or is it fruit, nuts and seeds, vegetables, or whole grains? What should go on the base of a healthy eating pyramid? Beans, fruits, nuts, veggies, or grains?
Definitely vegetables, but which are the healthiest ones? A major advance was made this year ranking vegetables. Graphs like this that I’ve shared over the years that compare the antioxidant power of foods were all based on very primitive methods—basically just measuring how much a food slows down an oxidation reaction between two chemicals in a machine. That was the best we had, but it required a leap of faith that what was happening in the test tube could be extrapolated to what might happen in living human tissue.
This year, though, a landmark study was published, pitting 34 common vegetables against 8 different types of human cancers. Breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and stomach cancer.
Let’s look at breast cancer—I’ll cover up the. What’s being measured is tumor cell proliferation. Here’s the control. You drip some water on a human breast tumor, and nothing happens—it’s still powering away at 100% growth rate. And these 7 vegetables appear useless against breast cancer, no different than placebo. But these 6 cut the cancer growth rate in half. And these 5 at the end stopped cancer growth completely—stopped these tumor cells dead in their tracks.
Take-home message #1: we need to eat a portfolio of vegetables. Take a look: radishes, do nothing against pancreatic cancer, in fact if anything they might accelerate growth but, against stomach cancer, they completely eliminated tumor cell growth. On the other hand, orange bell peppers don’t do much for stomach cancer, but can cut prostate cancer growth by more than 75%. So we need to eat a variety of vegetables, because each one tends to target different cancers.
If you’re particularly concerned about a specific cancer, like if you have a strong family history of breast cancer, then you can narrow it down and really nail those 5 or 6 veggies every day that excel at targeting breast tissue. But otherwise, to fight against any kind of cancer, we’ve got to eat a portfolio of vegetables to cover all our bases.
That doesn’t mean some veggies aren’t better than others. Some of these vegetables target multiple cancers at the same time. So using this groundbreaking new data, let’s play “Which is healthier.”
Imagine you’re standing in line at one of those custom made-to-order salad places, where you get to choose your lettuce, choose your toppings, then choose your dressing. Lets assume that you don’t have a strong family history of any particular cancer, and so aren’t trying to hone in on avoiding one tumor over another.
First, let’s choose our lettuce. Boston, endive, radicchio, romaine, or spinach?
Out of the five, spinach is #1 against breast cancer—remember, the farther right the better it is at slowing down these cancer cells. #1 against brain tumors, #1 against kidney cancer, #1 against lung cancer, #1 against pediatric brain tumors—feed your kids spinach! #1 against pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and #1 against stomach cancer.
Now note it’s not #1 overall—there are 16 vegetables more powerful at stopping stomach cancer growth than spinach, but out of those five salad greens, spinach wins out across the board, against every cancer type tested.
What if the salad place said they were out of spinach, though? Which comes in second out of the four left to choose from.
For breast cancer, radicchio is #2. against brain tumors. radicchio, kidney cancer, radicchio, radicchio, romaine, radicchio, radicchio, and radicchio. So overall, out of those choices for greens, radicchio is number 2.
Back to the menu. Next we get to choose 4 toppings. Now there’s a long line of people behind you, all staring at you to make your choice. You don’t have time to ponder and pick the 4 absolute best, but you can at least make a guess as to roughly where on the graph they are.
Yes or no? According to this amazing new data, do carrots slow cancer cell growth rates more than 50%? Yes or no?
The answer is no. No, no, no, no, no, no, and no. So shredded carrots aren’t going to make our top four toppings choice.

What about shredded beets? Yes or no?
Yes. Super yes! Brain tumor? Just beet it. Kidney cancer is a no, close to 50%, but not quite there. And then yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. So overall, yes for beets.

Are we putting cucumber on out salad? Yes? No?
As tasty as they may be… no. For most cancers it suppressed tumor cell growth less than 50%
What about a tomato? Yes or no?
No tomato either.
What about a potato? You can actually put potatoes onto your salad. Yes or no?
No potato either. Wait a second, no iceberg lettuce, carrots, cucumber, tomatos, potatos—that’s all people eat! That’s the problem. Even people eating their vegetables, aren’t really eating their vegetables. The majority of veggies people commonly eat have little effect.
Cutting to the chase: The line at the salad place is now out the door at this point. In this study there was one clear winner. One vegetable that completely 100% stopped cancer growth in 7 out of the 8 tumor lines. One of the most important findings of the year: which vegetable was it?
Was it bok choi? Broccoli. Brussel sprouts, fiddlehead ferns, garlic, kale, or red cabbage?
Number one against breast cancer? Garlic. Number one against brain tumors: garlic. Number two against kidney cancer: garlic. Lung cancer: garlic. Childhood brain tumors: garlic. Pancreatic cancer: garlic. Prostate cancer: garlic. And stomach cancer? Garlic. So might I suggest a garlicky salad dressing?
Wait a second, though. Is it just that garlic is toxic to all cells? Yes, it stops the growth of cancer cells, but maybe it stops the growth of healthy cells too? That wouldn’t be good. They tested for that. The black bars are cancer cells; the white bars are normal cells. As you can see garlic slams cancer cells, but doesn’t touch normal cells, and the same thing with pretty much all the vegetables. They’re selective; they go after the cancer cells but leave the normal cells alone. Veggies are amazing.
Now if you didn’t pick garlic and instead chose one of those others you probably weren’t far off. The two best families of vegetables for cancer prevention are the cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, kale, cabbage, and the allium family vegetables, like garlic, onions, and leeks. Let me just run through this one last time to highlight this important fact.
Starting from the beginning. Cruciferous vegetables in green; allium vegetables in yellow. What I want you to notice is the clustering of colors over on the right side, which illustrates the power of these two superfood classes of vegetables.
Whether for breast cancer, brain cancer, kidney cancer, lung cancer, or brain cancer. Interestingly you’ll notice that bok choy is often the odd one out, apparently the least healthy of the cruciferous vegetables. Pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and finally stomach cancer. So you know all those recipes that start with garlic and onions and then throw you in some greens—that, is the way to eat.
The researchers conclude: “the inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary-based chemopreventive strategies.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

To help out on the site please email volunteer@nutritionfacts.org

Dr. Michael Greger
  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/AdamRodriguez/ Adam Rodriguez

    This is the most informative health video i have ever seen, thank you!

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      Don’t forget to check out part 1 of this video (kind of like the prequel :) just to put it in context.

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/PeterHeeks/ Peter Heeks

    Incredible as always

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      Definitely one of my favorites!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/NouhAlaoui/ Nouh Alaoui

    amazing and life changing.

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      Definitely changed the way my family now eats!

      • guest

        dr. gregor, i tried to post this earlier but it didn’t post. How do you feel about all the people out there claiming that garlic harms brain cells, alters proper brain functioning, and other negative effects? There is no shortage of people who feel that garlic causes them a lack of mental clarity, and a disruption of what “feels” normal. A lot of the evidence is anecdotal, but do you really think nature wants us biting into a garlic bulb? It seems to me that our taste buds suggests we don’t do that. Any credible studies you are aware of in the negative consequences of garlic consumption? Much thanks.

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/tom/ tom

    Which vegetables are best for fighting the spread of prostate cancer ,I can’t find the list.
    I think your website is terrific , good job with this and the friendly narrations are perfect .

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/tom/ tom

    I figured it out by stopping the video turning my head and copying the top 10 under the prostate chart .
    Garlic is #1 and cabbage is a about 10th.
    Once again ,great great website

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      Sorry about the neck strain! If there’s anything you can’t read let me know and I can post a larger image in the Supplementary Info section.

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/RobertEdmands/ Robert Edmands

    I’m guessing that 50 cents I spent on a bulb of garlic was money well spent!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/ragingfestus/ ragingfestus

    Thanks for such a great resource!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/JenniferMallory/ Jennifer Mallory

    Are these best consumed raw or cooked!?!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/MelanieAnderson/ Melanie Anderson

    The most helpful cancer preventive video I have ever seen. Thank you!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/anya/ Anya

    Jennifer – great question! Dr Greger has a few videos on the topic of cooking methods and the effects on nutrients. In fact there’s one video that may be perfect for you: Best Cooking Method. You may also want to look at this article which does a nice overview of some of the other research on the topic.

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/yurple/ yurple

    Great stuff. What about mushrooms? I understand they are great, AND they are usually on the salad bar menu. Any intel to share?

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/MichelleRowe/ Michelle Rowe

    Awesome video, Dr. Greger! I am left with the question of the anticancer effects of raw vs. cooked garlic and onions. I know cooking reduces some of the nutrients but have raw and cooked alliums been tested in regard to the anti-cancer effects? In other words is it important to try to consume these raw notwithstanding their very strong flavors?

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      The secret to maintaining the anti-cancer effects of garlic is to either eat it raw (think salsa, homemade dressings, pesto, etc) or crush the garlic first, wait ten minutes, and then cook it. You know those chemical flares? You bend them, two chemicals mix and a light-emitting reaction takes place? The same kind of thing happens in garlic. Floating around in the cytoplasm of garlic cells is a compound called alliin and packed away in tiny intracellular storage compartments (called vacuoles) is an enzyme called alliinase. When the garlic tissues are crushed, the two mix and alliinase turns alliin into allicin, the phytonutrient thought to be responsible for many of garlic’s health benefits. Cooking destroys the enzyme, though, so even if you crush your garlic, if it’s thrown immediately into the pan, little allicin may be produced. Allicin is relatively heat stable, though, so if you chop your garlic and wait 10 minutes for the allicin to be formed, you can then cook it (the enzyme has already done its work) and presumably maintain many of the benefits.

      • LynnCS

        Hard to follow the chemical ways of the garlic, but thanks for posting that it is best eaten raw and if cooked to wait 10 mins. I get stomach discomfort when I eat garlic (I think) it is hard to tell what is doing it, because I get the same problem with other things.  I wish I could figure it out.  Anyone have any ideas about how to go about figuring out what is bothering your stomach?

        • Jacquie RN

          To really know what is bothering your stomach, I would suggest starting with a food diary or journal. Keep track of what you eat, how you feel, and the timing between the food and the feeling.You will begin to see a pattern. Keep in mind that if you are mixing foods you may not get a true picture of the culprit. But then take the foods one at a time, and journal. Its a puzzle to be solved!

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=670735069 Tan Truong

         Woah! Will remember this.

      • MikeZP

        in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWF8fPnE4wc

        Garlic is mentioned, it appears that the garlic oil is an important factor therefore the dried garlic (unless fried-oxidized) does not have these properties as RAW.

        • Luc

          Mike Thanks for sharing , this video is so interesting !!!

      • http://www.facebook.com/ryanseaton Ryan 船 Seaton

        I remember learning about this in April 2011 while my mother was dying from pancreatic cancer at the Cleaveland Clinic . Thanks (whole heartedly ) for the great summary and info re the alliinase , allin , allicin and all the info I’ve gleaned elsewhere , including nitrites, nitritates, nitric oxide, nitrisamines (sp) etc

        Is it true that according to Japanese Research , bananas may be better for us as they ripen and the black spots appear on the skin ? ( some TLC factor or something to that effect ? :-)

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/paulapooh/ PaulaPooh

    I Love this video so much, thank you! My question is should I consume the veggies/garlic, etc RAW or cooked? I like to do greensmoothies and juice, raw of course, are they veggies LESS anticancer if I cook them?? Also how much daily should I eat? Ex.- like 2 raw cloves of garlic in a savory smoothie?

    Any thoughts? Thanks, Paula

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      Thanks for your question PaulaPooh. Please see my answer to Michelle above.

      • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/paulapooh/ PaulaPooh

        Thank you!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/paulapooh/ PaulaPooh

    I am surprised to learn that Carrots didn’t do much in this study to block cancer growth…as it is heavily used in the Gerson Therapy to fight/prevent cancer…very odd! Did anyone else notice that? Thanks.

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

      I actually have a video coming our about Gerson Therapy–stay tuned! Unfortunately the data does not look good :(

      • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/paulapooh/ PaulaPooh

        Wow, oh no, I’m looking fwd to seeing that video! Thanks for all your hard work and research!

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/leszek/ Leszek

    That is a great video and sort of an eye opener. When it comes to garlic; how about the odorless or capsuled oils preparations? Are these any good?

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/lizbaltaro/ LizBaltaro

      Great question. I am curious about the prepared crushed garlic that comes in a jar too… is it any good? I am guessing these preparations can’t be as good as fresh garlic. However, are they better than not eating garlic at all?

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/ggnyc/ ggnyc

    I have a question about garlic. From watching the video it is my understanding garlic targest cancer cells but does not hurt regular cells. My first question is does this apply to both raw and cooked garlic and if so is one more effective than the other.

    My second request is to ask your help in sorting out the conflicting advice on garlic from other authors and researchers who say raw garlic especially is toxic to the body with cooked garlic less so. They say raw garlic can burn tiny holes in the lining of the stomach of some people and it is especially dangerous for people with leaky gut syndrome as the garlic can get in the blood where it is especially dangerous. They also say it is bad for brain cells. Please review these two short videos on garlic to see my point on the difficult conflicts in the advice. Thank you in advance for your help with sorting this out.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGMbAQNXlCY&feature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14aZbjs0mIY&feature=related

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/vallis/ Vallis

    It is pronounced radeekio. :-)

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/lonestarnot/ lonestarnot

    One of my favorite salads starts with wilted chard; but I didn’t see any of the traditional cooked greens — kale, mustard, red/green chard, turnip, collard, etc — in this video. Assuming a) they’re gently wilted for the salad, and b) diners appreciate their more robust texture … how would they compare in terms of cancer prevention?

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/gareyj/ gareyj

    Hey Doc, How does a petri dish experiment compare with the human body?

    Garey

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/nicolas/ Nicolas

    Isn’t it true though that some of the beneficial compounds don’t last long enough inside the human body to reach the tumors? The study was for extracts applied directly onto cancer cells, no?

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/ridley/ Ridley

    Dr. Greger:
    Where does swiss chard belong on the scale? I grow a lot of it and freeze it so that I can eat it all year. I use it the same way spinach is used. I much prefer it to spinach, and it is easier to grow in my climate. Does it have similar health benefits as spinach?

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/aguccionesbcglobal-net/ aguccione@sbcglobal.net

    Hi Ridley, Both the spinach and chard belong to the chenopod family, which also includes quinoa and beets. This is a phytonutrient-packed family of veggies. Here’s a link if you want to look into the detailed comparison between spinach and swiss chard: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=16 Also, here’s a very interesting study on more anti-cancer properties of plants http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/amla-versus-cancer-cell-growth/

  • lena98765

    Do I understand correctly that according to this data bok choy is actually cancer promoting? I ask because on the charts where lower is better bok choy often scores over 100%. I also wonder why bok choy would be the odd one out. It is packed with micronutrients and does contain ITC’s that should be cancer blocking. Very strange!

  • angie

    This is a wonderful site I’m glad I found it! I so wish this study covered colon and ovarian cancer. I would love some trust worthy facts on it… I’ve been doing a little research and I came up with Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kale, and Chai Tea. I know its a shocker but you cant believe everything you read on the net… I’m still confused on the soy milk in Chai tea issue.

  • Adam Druett

    Good too know about the cancer blocking properties of Spinach but i have heard lots of accounts from different books etc on how much Spinach is safe to eat given the higher levels of oxilates compared to other leafy greens. Is there any current guidelines for safe oxilate consumption and how that equates to servings per week for example?

    • NickyC

      Hi Adam. While you are correct that spinach has a higher content of oxalates compared to other dark leafy greens, I would argue that unless you are an infant, or someone with a history of oxalate kidney stones, the benefits of spinach definitely outweigh the risks assocaited with its oxalate content. This other video, which discusses oxalate consumption from beets, may be of interest to you: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/asparagus-pee/. That said, everything in moderation. Why not diversify your consumption of greens? Some spinach, some kale, some chard, some collards, etc. You can also check out another video that discusses the consumption (or overconsumption) of raw greens: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overdosing-on-greens/.

    • Robert Taylor

      does beets bell peppers with garlic combat prostate cancer

  • John C

    I noticed cabbage always scores much higher than red cabbage.   I assume that’s plain green cabbage.
    That seems counter-intuitive and I think you recommended red cabbage in another video.

  • http://poxacuatl.wordpress.com/ Strix

    How much garlic per day should we be eating for these benefits?
    How much beet as well; I heard not to eat too much beet — but how to know how much of what to eat?!

  • 2RHealth

    I noticed that the last part of the video showing yellow for the allium family and green for the cruciferous (brassica) family, the rutabagas got left out! They would add even more green to the chart!

    • Ed Sanville

      He also forgot that radishes are part of the cruciferous family (Brassicaceae)!

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    For some context, please check out my associated blog post The Best Foods: Test Your Nutrition Knowledge!

  • Emilieunkrich

    Excellent information.

  • Paul Holden

    Great video presenting vital information.  Thanks, Dr. Greger!  May I offer two comments on language from an English and foreign language teacher… First, radicchio is from Italian and is pronounced “rah-deek-ee-o”… in other words “ch” is always pronounced like “k” in English in Italian.  “Ci” is always pronounced “chee” as in “arriverderci.” 
    I know I am fighting a losing battle on this second point but I simply must try…
    “Healthy” and “healthful” are both adjectives.  The former refers to the physical (and mental and so on) status of anything alive, man, beast, or plant.  If, for example, a basil plant is healthy, it is thriving.  However, if one is pondering whether basal as a food substance is nutritious, the proper adjective is clearly “healthful” or ‘full of health” for the eater thereof.  As a linguist, I know that the tendency is for all languages to become simpler as they evolve, but must we permit this at the cost of clarity

    • Wegan

      oops, misspelled basil. ( not a complete sentence)

  • Abarnswell

    Wow, this is an amazing video! Thanks, Dr. Greger!! I do try to focus my eating around the healthiest spectrum of the greens, veggies, and fruits. Bok Choy and Red Cabbage were lower on the spectrum than I expected. But that’s okay. I’ll just eat more leeks, garlic, and onions. I already eat tons of spinach, kale, cauliflower, and broccoli. Thanks for this really useful and practical information. I had breast cancer (stage 0, surgically removed) in 2009, so now I eat (vegan) to fight cancer. I make cancer-fighting nutritional smoothies that contain the best cancer fighting nutrients and drink them (about 20 oz.) with every meal. And I’ve lost 40 pounds doing it… not a bad thing. :) ~ April

  • Guest

    1)  This study was in cell lines, not humans.  Are there studies out there that corroborate this effect in real life?
    2)  How much and in what form is necessary?  Raw garlic/onions are hard to take in large quantities.  Does cooking destroy the antiproliferative effect?  3) Does a daily, well-rounded vegetarian/vegan diet give sufficient quantities to do the job, or are “super-quantities” needed?

    Thanks for an amazing array of practical health topics

  • Lxw202

    Very informative. Just shared with my friends!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=534563153 Philipp Schilmann

    Very interesting. I’ve been taking the NEWCHAPTER Organic Garlic Force pills for some time. Are those kind of supplements any good?

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Please also check out my associated blog post Fighting Inflammation with Food Synergy

  • guest

    what about kale? 

  • Teresa

    Your site is amazing. Thank you so much. I just posted a link to this video on a private Facebook site for a particular cancer. 

  • http://twitter.com/garyyuen गरिष्ठ

    It’s worth checking out Chinese Nutrition Therapy, one of the few decent books in English on a Chinese medicinal diet. Only recently did I notice there was a decent correlation between the vegetables, herbs, oils, nuts, grains & other foods that act on certain organ networks and the data from those studies.

  • Jasmin

    excellent pacing and summarizing. Good stuff!

  • Mconniecarney

    Both interesting and informative.  I love the fact that the presentation is completely based on experiments presented in a peer reviewed medical journal, but in layman terms.

  • Valnaples

    @Charlotte, this particular video by Dr. Greger is powerful indeed; hope you can also spend an hour of time and watch his “Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death” dvd that he has so compassionately shared FREE here on his website, on FB, and on youtube. It is remarkable and wo@27e16bfde4827c69112fccc8dafde66b:disqus nderful!

  • LynnCS

    I was with you talking about the salad bar.  Raw onions and greens are high on my salad ingredients.  Then you mentioned starting a cooked dish with cooking up the garlic and onions followed by the greens.  Doesn’t cooking remove the very good substances we need?

  • http://www.facebook.com/jasmine.steers Jasmine Steers

    Awesome info….thanks for sharing!

  • superfoodsbook

    I will make a green smoothie recipe out of the main ones you listed for my brother who has a brain tumor. Hopefully he will get into the habit of having one daily.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_JC5V3H74SFZHA4MGESGJEKH7IA John

       Be careful with that.  I got into trouble with Mom when she was dying of pancreatic cancer by raising vitamin K levels and perhaps causing blood clots.  Was giving her a green soup with most of those ingredients.  It may or may not have caused the blood clots but I sincerely doubt it did her any good.

  • Dechillo

    Radicchio is not pronounced with the “ch”sound as in chair, but as a “k” sound.
    Pronounce like radikio. Thought you might want to know. :)

  • Sofia

    This is fascinating.

  • Magdaleno81

    Does this have to be organic??

    • Toxins

      No it does not, as you should eat vegetables in whichever way entices you to eat them the most.

  • Danny Boy

    If red cabbage has more antioxidants than green cabbage, why does green cabbage out-perform red cabbage in cancer fighting?

    • WTF99

      This is a serious question

  • Jason Evans

    what is the difference between red and green cabbage?

  • http://www.facebook.com/heerad.hojjatian Heerad Hojjatian

    stop the celebrating people.now tell if im wrong.., but doesnt garlic attack probiotics in the gut?? i understood the cancerous benefits but isnt there other factors u should account for before u tell people to fill themselves with garlic?!

    • Turmeric Lover

      No, garlic does not ‘attack probiotics in the gut’. garlic is a PREbiotic, Or in other words; fuel for, and very helpful to the probiotics that help us so much.

  • http://www.loversparrow.tumblr.com/ Beau Boeye

    Is there a place where I can access those graphs you used in the video? It’s wonderful information and I would love to have them saved to my computer!

    • http://www.loversparrow.tumblr.com/ Beau Boeye

      I’m silly. I followed your sources cited and found exactly what I was looking for.

  • PIRKASH GANGLANI

    thank you for this article, i find it very informative, i would like to know if the beetroot you mentioned, should be raw or could it be boiled. thanks

  • DrFarrowMD

    Dr. McGregor, This information seems very important, but I would like actual copies of these graphs. For instance, I have an uncle with metastatic prostate cancer. I would like to look at the entire graph and each vegetable, and give him a copy, so he can increase all the top ones whereever possible. You need to create handouts of this if you really want to help people the most.

  • albert

    so far this is the only video on radishes – this is so unfair :) BTW they hold up well in those rankings!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=725986334 Wendy Alfaro

    Romaine lettuce infused with passion fruit and green tea dressing

    Ingredients

    1 small head of romaine lettuce

    ½ cup of pineapple chunks

    3/4 cup of passion fruit juice

    ½ cup matcha green tea (made out from 2 bags)

    1 teaspoon olive oil

    Salt to taste

    Preparation:

    1. Cut romaine lettuce into small pieces.

    2. Add the pineapple chunks on top of the romaine.

    3. In a small bowl mix the passion fruit juice, green tea, olive oil and salt.

    4. Toss romaine lettuce with the dressing (step 3).

  • john fuhrman

    Does the minced garlic one finds in a gar at the grocery store have the same anti-cancer properties as fresh garlic?

  • http://www.facebook.com/jonathanhoth Jonathan Ho

    Is there any scientific study on anticancer fruits?

  • Allen Khorasani

    Oh no… I HATE garlic, I can’t stand the taste or the smell.. I always said if I had it my way I would legalize pot and criminalize garlic :) I think I am just going to take my chances on this one, but an amazing video, as always, thank you

  • Ronald Chavin

    Petri dish studies like this one should not be taken too seriously, especially when epidemiological studies contradict them. For example, tomatoes and carrots did not prevent cancer too well in this petri dish study but tomatoes and carrots worked very well at preventing cancer for real populations of real people:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9605210
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23352874
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15006906
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16227704

  • Eddie Schultz

    My Mother is stage IV Lung cancer, and it is pushing into her ribs. She also has a blood clot in her upper left chest, just below her shoulder. Will the vegetables you mention that fight lung cancer help prolong her life? She’s coming home today from the hospital, and we are trying to find anything that might stop the mass from growing so it doesn’t continue to push on her ribs. The Doctor’s also said the cancer has most likely started in her bones because of the cancer pushing on her ribs. Please email me.

  • Lollie

    I grew up eating spinach and love it! I love all my greens, but it didn’t prevent me getting breast cancer!

  • Josy G.

    What a wonderful video Dr. Greger! I visit your site constantly and I’ve learned so much from it! My husband has stomach cancer and its wonderful to know we can come here for reliable information! Thank you so much for your hard work! God bless!

  • lovestobevegan

    Road Trip Winnebago Soup

    – 3 lbs organic* potatoes, peeled
    – 4 large rutabagas, cubed
    – 1 bulb garlic, peeled and crushed
    – 1 large red onion, chopped
    – 1 large yellow onion, chopped
    – 1 leek, sliced
    – 6 cups water/homemade vegetable broth
    – 2 tbsp dill weed
    – 1 tbsp cilantro
    – 1 tbsp parsley
    – 2 tsp paprika

    Peel and crush garlic, then set aside while preparing the other vegetables. Add all ingredients to a large soup pot and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat until potatoes are soft and mashable. Thicken the soup to your desired consistency by mashing the potatoes against the side of the pot with a fork. Season to taste with sea salt.

    *Potatoes rank 10th (up from 12th last year) in the “dirty dozen: 12 foods to eat organic” so choose organic. http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/list.php

    Bookmark my new Plant-Based Emporium Facebook page for all my latest recipes. https://www.facebook.com/PlantBasedEmporium?ref=stream&hc_location=timeline

    ~Complements of lovestobevegan

  • katerinap

    radicchio: it’s pronounced [ruddikyo]

  • Brijesh Devadatha

    great one, really loved it

  • Lynn Maas

    Whew. Great Information. However, what about the juicing of raw veggies in the cabbage family for those of us who have Hypothroid Disorder?

  • Or Tal

    Unbelievable. I love you Dr.

  • Crazysexyfuntraveler

    I so loved this video, very informative and now I know better what to choose :)

  • lovestobevegan

    For even more cancer-fighting power serve this soup with some cruciferous vegetables such as steamed Brussels sprouts or kale.

    Potleek Soup

    – 4 cups water/homemade vegetable broth
    – 9 potatoes, peeled and cubed
    – 1 leek, thinly sliced
    – 1-2 tbsp fresh rosemary
    – Sea salt

    Place all ingredients, except sea salt, in a large soup pot and bring to a boil. Turn off heat but leave pot on hot burner. Once potatoes are soft, mash some against the side of the pot with a fork until soup thickens to desired consistency. Season to taste with sea salt.

    ~Complements of lovestobevegan

  • Denis Spasyuk

    garlic is a perfect remedies against cancer and people :)

  • william doubleday

    great video dr g.

  • Rosemary Guy

    since i dislike garlic and so does buddha, I’m glad there are other options outside the allium family……….above the 50% mark sounds good and i’ve always had a preference for those veges as well………..Is radish related to beetroot in someway? They seem to be up there as well?

  • http://www.mamihlapinatapai.com/ GhostFaceArchitek

    What about Kale?

  • Luc

    http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/cancer

    The above webpage suggests that it might even be more benefical (in terms of getting cancer) to add fish tou a vegan diet compaired to eating pure vegan. So this is not a black and white story between vegetarian and meat. How little do we know about what is really going on in our body ? I have also seen reports where vegans show to have less lymphosites. My understanding is that those are the white bloodcels that are supposed to recognise and kill cancer in an early stage. I am a vegan now for 2 years (except on christmas and newyears day), but still wondering if the optimal line for our health is really between animal and plant kingdom.

  • Carl Borja Nelson

    We live on Guam and my wife has stage 4 breast cancer. I’m doing what I can nutritionally to help manage the illness the best we can (in addition to the unfortunate toxic chemo routine). Can you tell me if there are any studies providing evidence for or against the rampant recommendations I hear for soursop fruit (and a tea using the leaves) in treating cancer. I’ve had it recommended many, many times. One phrase I’ve heard over and over is that it’s “10,000 times more powerful than chemo” in dealing with cancer. Just wondering if where there’s so much smoke there might be a little fire.

  • Jim

    Doctor Great information.

    I understand from the comments below that raw garlic is the best way to eat garlic. How much garlic would you recommend we eat per day and how do we eat this amount of garlic without loosing our friends due to halitosis (my spelling maybe wrong but I think you get the point). Thanks again.

    Jim D

  • Rob

    Best video ever!
    Thank you, thank you, thank you Dr. Greger M.D..

  • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Aqiyl Aniys

    Thank you for the is informative video.I am a heavy kale and onion eater. Adding garlic to my diet is something I need to think about.

  • Noam

    Hi Dr. Greger, I wander about the relevance of this paper for our health, as what we eat goes through our digestive system before it gets to the cancer cells. therefore we must ask how do these veggies effect cancer cells after they were goen through the digestive system.

  • Sasha

    Hello DR. Michael …… how many garlic should one consume per day ( raw and cooked ) if cancer is already detected in body?

    And last question …. by squashing garlic and cooking it ….. how much of the cancer fighting power do we lose?

    Thank you in advance.

  • VC

    Great video
    I Nutribullet every morning for breakfast and Lunch this combo:
    Handful of Raw Kale, Spinach then raw ginger, 1/2 avocado, raw beet, 5 strawberrys, 1/2 banana, cinnamon, teaspoon vanilla extract, 1 cup of sun warrior plant protein(no soy) and Almond milk….It tastes great…

  • Megan F

    Not sure if everyone knows this but you should only be buying garlic from the us or canada. The ones from China and other countries have been found to have been grown in, and it’s unbelievably gross, human feces. Or just grow it yourself.

  • Southlander

    While I’ve slowly; but surely been going vegitarian, this puts my Stage 4 lung cancer in a new light. With “thanks” and “appreciation”. Don and WE CAN! :-))

  • lovestobevegan

    Allium vs. Predator

    -2 cups red lentils
    -4 cups water/homemade vegetable broth
    -1 red onion, chopped
    -6 cloves garlic, minced
    -1 large leek, sliced
    -3 shallots, chopped
    -½ cup purple cabbage, diced

    Mince garlic and set aside. Bring water and lentils to a boil while chopping vegetables. Turn heat to low and add vegetables. Simmer over low until lentils tender. Serve with toasted corn tortillas and steamed beets or kale.

    ~complements of plant-based emporium

  • Sasha

    DR. Michael ….. is garlic good only for prevention or its good for fighting cancer as well?

    Thanks in advance.

  • Arjan den Hollander.

    Seems leeks are the big winners here not the garlic.

    Who can manage more then 2 cloves a day, every single day?
    Even that is stretching it.
    While having a fixed 100-150 gr of leeks in a diet plan is extremely doable.
    Even possibly tripled if confronted with ailments, would still be manageable.

    I’ll add a fixed 100 gr of them to the daily veggy intake.

    Still regularly amazed over the sheer bulk a person can consume eating a plant based diet. My veggies alone is about 1 – 1,2 kg a day. The fruit brings it easily to 2 kg. Thats not even counting the starchy carbs, nuts and seeds.

    Feel like a silverback gorilla eating all day long :). Only bulk I gain is muscle mass. Its trully amazing.

  • donmatesz

    I noticed that rutabaga and radish also had strong anti-cancer properties against several cancers, but you did not correctly mark them as cruciferous vegetables. These are crucifers (Brassica fm.) as well and would in several of the charts increase the green shading representation of that family at the right side of the graphs.