Doctor's Note

The first half of the video is basically just a review of all the flax and breast cancer work I’ve already cover:

Flaxseeds may also help fight hormone-mediated cancers in men. See Flaxseed vs. Prostate Cancer and Was It the Flaxseed, Fat Restriction, or Both?

What else can these puppies do? See:

I have another 100+ videos on breast cancer if you want to become an expert and help take care of yourself and/or the women in your life. Here’s a few recent ones to get you started:

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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  • Ob Serdious

    Is there a recipe for that muffin pictured above?

    • Darryl

      Perhaps this, though its not plant-based. You may want to use buttermilk and egg substitutes.

  • brec

    If, like me, you were unfamiliar with the term “lignan[s]” and turned to either your dictionary (in my case, Am. Heritage 4th Ed.) or to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lignan and found — nothing! …

    Then here you go:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lignan
    or
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/medlineplus/lignan

  • Rebecca

    I was adding flax seed to my smoothies and had a six week long period – until I suspected flax was the culprit and stopped consuming it. Never had that situation since…

    • http://twitter.com/MacSmiley MacSmiley

      How much flaxseed caused that issue?

      • Rebecca

        Two tablespoons per day

        • http://twitter.com/MacSmiley MacSmiley

          Interesting. I wonder if 1tablespoon a day would cause the same issue.

    • Gar Zuzik

      To fully suspect one factor for something like that seems not-called for, especially due to the fact that it has estrogen excretion properties. I would attempt it again, but with maybe less flax ground, simply due to the fact that it has so many benefits (eicosaniod pathway) for a mass majority of the population. I hope it does not have negative effects again, but would totally understand if you would be hesitant to reuse flax.

      • Rebecca

        Thanks. That’s what I suspected also. I’m trying the chia seeds. Similar cardioprotective factors.

        • Gar Zuzik

          That is great to hear. Stay positive, keep an open mind and always question. :)

        • Jackie Thomas

          try fish oil. It’s filled with omega 3.

          • Toxins

            Please see here for fish oil, it is not recommended by Dr. Greger for many reasons.
            http://nutritionfacts.org/?s=fish+oil

          • DanielFaster

            No lignans in fish oil only mercury and cadmium. People just don’t get that oil is not a food group not wfpb

  • Darryl

    Oops, I may have accidentally deleted someone else’s comment.

    For the person seeking the recipe for the pictured muffin, I believe its the first link in a search for “pumpkin cranberry supremely healthy seeded muffin“, and while the recipe isn’t plant based, it can be made so with quick egg and buttermilk substitutes.

    • reheated pasta

      hi darryl, really enjoy your posts. it would be great to get the opinion of the NF team regarding this article

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-29629761

      • Darryl

        We recently had a discussion on reheating potatoes here, and there’s evidence that repeated cycles of heating and cooling increase the amount of starch resistant to in vitro digestion. Starch retrogradation, where the amylose strands align, exclude water molecules, form hydrogen bonds, and become resistant to our digestive enzymes, has been described as like a crystalization process. Cycles of starch heating and cooling perhaps are akin to annealing in metallurgy, where a crystalline structure with dislocations and other imperfections is heated and slowly cooled, permitting atoms to redistribute themselves towards a low energy equilibrium state. One can imagine the amylose strands finding tighter (and more resistant) alignments during a thermal cycle. And lo, the term “annealing” has been applied to starch engineering as well. One for the stack.

        • Gar Zuzik

          well done, I enjoyed that highly.

  • Tom Zdrojewski

    Would homemade flaxmilk provide the same benefits as just eating ground flax?

    • http://twitter.com/MacSmiley MacSmiley

      Flaxmilk? Ça existe?

      • Tom Zdrojewski

        You can buy it in stores, I believe, but I put flax seeds in a blender with water and a tiny amount each of vanilla extract and agave. It tasted ok, I’d drink some every day if it was giving me the flax benefit. I did strain out most of the pulp but some was left in, which eventually settled.

        • http://twitter.com/MacSmiley MacSmiley

          Not sure if ALL the benefits of flax are received via flax milk since a good deal of the fiber is filtered out. Reminds me of commercial almond milk which lacks the protein of soy milk.

        • DanielFaster

          Why filter it? Here’s my anticamcer morning pick me up – 2 cups rejuvalac [made with lactofermented quinoa], 1 inch fresh tumeric, 1 inch of fresh ginger root, couple of black pepper corns, juice from 1 lemon, 2-3tablespoons ground flax seeds, 1 Tbsp fenugreek seeds, a small jalapeño, just put it all in the vitamix and slam it down. Maybe add a few cranberries, juniper berries, allspice, cloves, cinnamon etc depending on how I feel. Usually fresh grind the flax and other seeds in a coffee grinder first.

    • http://bibiviro.com BIBI VIRO

      You are missing out on some of the fiber. Dr Greger has a lot to say on the importance of fiber.

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        Yes – you know: Small poops, big hospitals, big poops, smal hospitals….

        • Thea

          Oh that’s so funny. :-) You are a clever guy. (I had to think about that one a minute before I laughed.)

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            Actually, I think the author of this quote is Dr. Burkitt ?

          • Thea

            Oh! Well, I’ll still think of you as the funny guy. :-)

        • Larry G Maloney

          LOL, very funny…lot of science to back that up.

        • LailaShoshana

          I don’t get it ~ big hospitals are what and small hospitals represent which ones?

          • Thea

            Laila: people who eat SAD/poorly have small poops. You need big hospitals to deal with all those people who get sick because of their fiber-poor, animal and junk-rich diets. But if people ate whole plant food diets, they would have lots of fiber and nice, big and frequent poops. They would be very healthy, and as a society, we could have small hospitals because the need for hospitals would be a lot smaller. ;-)

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            Nice way to poop it – put it !!
            :-)

    • Julie Cornelius

      Making homemade flax milk is a great idea to avoid buying flax milk with added sugar or other processed ingredients. Although, flaxmilk does not have the fiber content that the ground flax does. See the video Dr. Burkitt’s F-Word Diet to learn more about why fiber is an important component of the diet.

  • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

    Helpful Hint: I use ground flaxseeds instead of parmesan cheese. A vegan pasta dish with ground flaxseeds and Maldon sea salt tastes great!

    • http://SmartDreams.net Gayle Delaney PhD

      Hi Plantstrongdoc, Since we do very low salt, and are just learning to cook, do you think ground flax seeds and nutritional yeast would be good on Pasta, say, eggplant, tomato, onions, garlic, oregano, etc. on pasta)?

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        Absolutely! I like the taste of nutritional yeast. Instead of salt try to use lemon juice (fresh) – on the food, after cooking.

  • Russ Crowe

    Roman Gladiators were “mostly vegetarian”: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-29723384

    • guest

      But where did they get their B12? There surely were not B12 pills back then.

      • Gar Zuzik

        The chlorination of the water supply appears to be the main contributing factor for why vegans cannot get sufficient b12 without shots or pills. The addition to the water supply is beneficial for prevention of water born parasites/ect.., but this is an issue that can lead one to believe that humans are “meant to eat meat”, where the evidence is reflected by the diet related disease states that arise from consumption. I take the tablet once daily for all the benefit of avoidance of meat and more intake of edible plants.

        B12 is produced firstly in the stomach and then formed in its’ entirety as it passes through the intestines (intrinsic factor and other transporters/ ect.. are involved for simplicities sake). The animal has it within its’ tissues that you consume but at the expense of eating meat.

        • Larry G Maloney

          If you didn’t live in an 21st century artificial environment you’d be exposed to B-12 constantly. Those Roman gladiators didn’t bath dairy, or even weekly, I bet. They didn’t wash their hands after using the community bathroom so B-12 was even on their dirty hands. Indeed, today we exist in a different environment, a different world. Gladiators eating plant food with “dirty” hands would get a healthy dose of B-12 every meal. LOL, like you, I prefer a pill.

      • ReluctantVegan

        During battle, the enemy’s blood would get in their mouths. Gross. I shouldn’t have said that.

        • Larry G Maloney

          So…all others were deficient in B-12, except for rough sex?

        • Larry G Maloney

          But did they swallow?

        • Larry G Maloney

          ReluctantVegan, I have an assistant who deletes for me. I don’t even have to think about it. I only type that stuff so they have a purpose.

          • ReluctantVegan

            Oh dear me, Larry G Maloney, I just now clicked on your name to read your other stuff. I didn’t realize there had been issues with censorship previously. No disrespect to you intended. I tried to delete my “battle” comment as I said I would, but it wouldn’t go away. The name just turned to “Guest”, and now it won’t delete. Do you know how to fix that?

          • Thea

            ReluctantVegan: I’m not sure why you weren’t able to delete your own comment. (It would be a Disqus bug.) But it looks like I was able to do the deleting as a moderator on the site.

            I also wanted to say: Thank you for self-monitoring. That’s great.

          • Thea

            ReluctantVegan: One more note. After supposedly deleting the comments, I went to double-check and the comments were still there. So, I’m not sure whats going on.

          • ReluctantVegan

            Well, they are gone now. Can you delete this whole exchange about deleting, please?

      • Larry G Maloney

        B-12 is in germs…on dirt, dirty plants, all over in nature. It’s not in meat! It’s the germs on the meat that have B-12. Roman gladiators didn’t use Clorox to clean the kitchen, their tidy whity’s weren’t, and their environment wasn’t 100% artificial. They actually touched dirt! Today we take B-12 capsules because we are so far removed from our natural environment we don’t even come in contact with it. EVERYTHING around you is fake. You are isolated from nature (reality). Everything you accept as normal is created by man.

        Needing B-12 supplements isn’t a knock on veganism; mankind has never (to my knowledge) gotten B-12 from eating plants (except dirty plants). It’s always been exposure to the germs in nature. Even today’s gladiators, foot ballplayers, battle on artificial grass, wear plastic helmets, and plastic armor. Dirt is something buried beneath the concrete. Were protected from reality in a sterile cocoon. Isn’t it ironic air inside our homes is ten times more contaminated than the real stuff outside?

        If a Roman gladiator invented the first B-12 capsule it would be filled with dirt.

        • Gar Zuzik

          numerous professors I come in contact with daily would refute that Larry G, said politely.

          • Larry G Maloney

            Gar Zuzik, you don’t speak for those professors, I suspect. But why would they waste their time refuting anything I say? After al, I am but a layman…sharing what medical doctors say. For example, I was being polite about the source of B-12, it’s abundant on animal poo…which gets on plants.

            What would be more interesting is for you to show this video to those professors you contact daily and see if they disagree with Dr. McDougall: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPmxREetE0Y
            Also, if you type into a search engine “Dr. McDougall, B-12” several other articles will show similar knowledge.
            I suppose hidden away somewhere, NF has a comment or two about B-12. Please share this with those professors and get back with us on their views after hearing what dr. McDougall has to say on B-12. Or, is it possible you are saying the professors prefer I use the word “bacteria” instead of “germ”? If so I stand corrected. The germane point is we don’t need to (and should not) eat meat to get B-12. I don’t want anyone distracted by a straw issue (germ vs bacteria). A rose by any other name still smells as sweet as a rose.

    • Thea

      Russ: Thanks so much for this link! I’ve heard this information before, but did not have a reference for a study to back it up. I’ve been looking for just such a reference for a long time. This is great info. Thanks!

  • Kat

    I didn’t hear anything about grinding the flax seeds. Humans don’t absorb much unless the flax seeds are ground!

    • Larry G Maloney

      Kat, good point. People on other web sites promoting ground flaxseed get anal about which method and brand of grinder produces the finest ground flax. How fine it’s ground isn’t even an issue as far as digestion is concerned. A few seconds of grinding breaks up the tough outer shell. Stomach acid will take it from there. My fifteen dollar Kitchen Aid, one-cup blender, does the job. Grind a little longer…fifteen whole seconds and it’s fine enough for baking. Flax oil is destroyed by heating. But baking ground flaxseed doesn’t seen to be a problem.

      I buy 25 pound bags of flaxseed and store in the freezer so bugs don’t infest. Ground flaxseed keeps my kitty’s fur soft and shiny and her healthy.

  • Ivan L.

    Uhhh…where’s the recipe to that delicious looking muffin??

  • http://Oozemon.com Coacervate

    This is probably silly sounding but men can get breast cancer too. Everybody needs their flax seeds. We grind 2 tbs for our bread machine recipe. works a treat. I’ve got to try some muffin recipes.. BTW,if you are new to them, I’d recommend that you start with a tsp and work your way up to 2 tbs per day. They gave me quite some trouble at first but backing off and adding them in gradually was the trick.

    • Gar Zuzik

      (not to be picky but we do not “need” flax) {said friendly}, but it is very beneficial for numerous vitamins,minerals, micro-nutrients and also for the eicosanoid pathway, especially for the Americanized “SAD” diet that consumes practically no fiber in comparison to our past, and high 0mega-6 content (and Arachnoid Acid by animal intake).

      As one eats healthier, causing less inflammation, the benefit of flax will be lessened possibly.

      • Larry G Maloney

        Gar, makes sense…once the poisons are removed the antidote need not be as potent.

      • Larry G Maloney

        Gar, according to one (or more) of Dr. Gerber’s videos, flaxseed can not only prevent cancer but it can cure some cancer. In my opinion, someone with cancer or someone who wants to avoid cancer can benefit from flaxseed.

        Ya know, it’s one thing to look through a microscope and see one tiny thing and declare this or that fact, but it takes some work to put the whole body of knowledge in perspective and made intelligent decisions about what can help us be healthy and what is harmful. If you cross a busy intersection you can look up and down the street and avoid the dangerous traffic. Or you can look through binoculars and see the other side of the street up close and personal, and not see the eighteen wheeler rolling over you.

    • Thea

      Coacervate: This is a great reminder. Thanks for the post – and the helpful tip for people just starting.

    • Violet

      What was the “trouble” if you please? I’m soon to start adding them myself.

      • http://Oozemon.com Coacervate

        Diarrhea. Combined with the high fiber i was already getting the flax tipped the balance and things came undone. Start slowly, add in multiple small hits rather than one big “plug” … well worth the effort though. oh, grind thoroughly helps too I think. Best wishes

  • Shelly b

    Flax seeds seem to depress my immune system. I get tired and lethargic for 24 hours. Pumpkin seeds I do better on.

    • Larry G Maloney

      Shelly, perhaps unknowingly your sleeping with a very tiny pea under your mattress.

  • guest

    cyanide content in flax seeds?

  • Gar Zuzik

    Relation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and IGF-binding protein 3 concentrations with intakes of fruit, vegetables,
    and antioxidants is a rather confusing study inregards to cancer prevention and seems to paint a picture of cancer rate increase due to plant food ingestion.

    • Toxins

      Gar, what exactly are you talking about? Higher intakes of fruits and veggies is linked with decreased IGF-1.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/index.php?s=igf-1

      • Gar Zuzik

        Relation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and IGF-binding protein 3 concentrations with intakes of fruit, vegetables,
        and antioxidants 1,2,3

        • Gar Zuzik

          I was rather confused due to the fact that numerous other studies all seem to conclude a major benefit and causation of more plant food consumed and lower igf-1/2 and more binding of the IGf’s.

          • Gar Zuzik

            “Conclusion: Women with higher intakes of citrus fruit or dietary vitamin C tend to have higher plasma concentrations of IGF-I and lower
            plasma concentrations of IGFBP-3”

            By stating plasma, is that implying a benefit by not being intracellular? That doesn’t seem to be right.

          • Toxins

            The methodology of the study is not that strong in my opinion. I think the direct before and after interventional feeding studies are far more compelling. A large number of studies with a similar design as the study you shared would be more interesting and more compelling.

          • Gar Zuzik

            What would you state is unfavorable in the methodology section? (i am a sponge for stuff like this sorry).
            The doctor should take notice of this study due to the fact that he offered a challenge (and reward??) to proving negative impact of fruits/vegetables on health.

          • Toxins

            I have not read every detail of the study, but here are my impressions from moderate skimming (I am currently studying organic chemistry and do not have a lot of time to read the whole thing). The fact that it was merely a FFQ and it looked at strictly plant components without considerations for other components of the diet is a drawback. In addition, citrus fruits could indicate orange juice, not necessarily whole oranges. Also, vegetables showed no association with IGF-1. This again brings me back to questioning what the other dietary components are, we just can’t know from this. Interventional studies are considered higher quality for several reasons as noted above. Like I said, if there was a larger quantity of studies with the same methodology showing the same results than that would be more meaningful.

          • b00mer

            From their own paragraph detailing the weaknesses of their study:

            “In addition, intake of vitamin C from supplements accounts for a major proportion of the variance in total vitamin C intake (90%).”

          • Toxins

            Or I should say slightly altered methodology not the same

          • Gar Zuzik

            1542 subjects used,

            Diet was assessed with a validated self-administrated 161-item semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ; 97GP copyrighted at Harvard University, Boston, MA) (40),
            which included 28 vegetable and 16 fruit items.

            For each food item, a standard portion size was specified and the participants
            were asked how often,on average (ranging from“never” to “6 or more” times/d), they had consumed this item during the year preceding blood collection.

            “the FFQ has been shown to be valid and reliable”
            An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with reagent from Diagnostic Systems Laboratory (Webster, TX) was used to measureIGF-I and IGFBP-3

          • Gar Zuzik

            Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Alleviates High-Fat Diet–Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction
            states how IGF-1 is upregulated during periods of highfat/unfavorable dieting.

          • Gar Zuzik

            Heart Smart Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1

            Reduced IGF-1 levels are associated with obesity, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus, whereas elevated IGF-1 has been associated with longevity in humans.3

          • Gar Zuzik

            New insights into IGF-1 signaling in the heart

          • Toxins

            I read all that, and my points remain valid.

          • Gar Zuzik

            thank you for that insight. It is rather confusing when reading over studies sometimes, even when someone has done it for a long amount of time.

            In terms of specific constituents it appears that all the research right now is pointing to the benefits of veganism (downregulation I believe off the top of my head) and mTor. The Leucine, methionine and arachadonic acid connections to lessened health/predisposition to cancer/disease is still in its’ researched infancy, if you feel the same.

          • Larry G Maloney

            The game the meat and dairy industries plays is “were waiting on the research”. Anyone trying to discredit a plant based diet resorts to overtures about needing more research before reaching a conclusion. Meanwhile the sale of met and diary and it’s glutinous consumption continues to create the worst health crisis in our Nation’s history..
            Look at the matter from a biology perspective. Humans have especially long intestines evolved so slow digesting fibrous plants can be processed and nutrients extracted over time. Our long intestines cause meat to stay inside way too long and the harmful cholesterol from eating meat and dairy gets absorbed. We have color vision so can cognize a ripe apple or banana. Our teeth are not suitable for the tasks of being a carnivore.
            True carnivores have sharp piercing teeth and a powerful jaw. Generally they can out run their prey. Their intestines are relatively short allowing poisonous cholesterol to pass in little time. They lack our color vision because they don’t need to know whether an apple or banana is ripe.
            Long before mankind had the accumulated knowledge and sophisticated tools to examine the elements of nutrition on a molecular level, observing men of science recognized the harm of meat and dairy and the health and healing form plant consumption. Relying on microscopic science to make a judgment call is a poor practice because whatever you decide it’s at risk for being trumped by yet another study. Not knowing 100% the chemistry does not invalidate the observations of several hundred years. As our ability to delve deep into the mysteries of molecular science we continue to discover why apples are good for us. Finding a negative aspect of any plant food it appears is offset by some other discovery that puts the original study in balance and perspective. Society suffers while yet another study is studied.

          • Gar Zuzik

            I do agree with you Larry G about the anatomical indicators of our more/ possibly exclusive plant-based past, but I also believe that we have the ability as humans to connection non-connectible things.
            (The famous ice-cream consumption during summer assumed causation to increased rates of shark attacks, where we all know that more people are swimming during summer, thus more people in water to be attacked). A quick overview of the statistics would lead researchers down a completely wrong causative path.

            Simply stated, we assume and connect things and that is why more and larger/better studies are always needed to find a conclusion. Sadly, until the facts are several times more indicative of the negatives of less plants and more meat many people will not be influenced by the “largest studies ever” because these foods (along with processed) are convenient and instantly satisfactory.

            The mantis Shrimp has many more visual spectrum frequencies that it utilizes for hunting prey. Under the previous response by Larry it would be concluded that those shrimp are even more “vegan-designed” than us.

            I know how I would respond to my statement, and that would be,
            “it is the combination of plant-based anatomical indicators that shows we are plant-based and better suited for it” but if you added up a bunch of assumption my point still stands.

            That being said, I agree with you because the blood brain barrier breaching effect of hamain (sorry for spelling mistake) upon meat consumption appears at this time to be very detrimental for hours later.
            (the gut bacteria connection to meat vs. plant consumption is still in its’ infancy in my oppinion).

            The end message is that we are always discovering but obviously the research is not convincing enough due to the numerous of other 23yo’s that eat terribly, unlike myself.

            The anatomical findings are memorable and intriguing, but people will always be skeptical in my opinion due to the fall to “we will adapt” response. The better path I feel is to remind people of the short-term benefits of plant-based, and especially in a professional manner the sexual benefits.

          • Larry G Maloney

            “More and larger studies” is the excuse for keeping the public ignorant about the valid studies already helping those who access them. Additional studies is the manipulative tool use by America’s most prolific science, “Marketing” to keep Americans feeing at profitable meat and dairy troughs. Folks don’t prefer meat and dairy because enough studies haven’t been completed and they still question the science behind a plant based diet. Not at all, they eat meat and dairy because it’s what’s constantly marketed to them. You see, gar, it’s not abut science, it’s about marketing. Marketers claim we need more studies. Just like marketers almost weekly release a new study showing chocolate is healthy for us (sponsored by Mars, Inc., of course) How foolish it is to argue in academia about plant food vs animal food when science proved long ago the harm of animal food and he protection provided by a plant based diet. Marketing triumphs because money is behind it.

            How are you claiming the manta shrimp evolved to be a meat (or is it plant) eater? Even without knowing anything about this shrimp I’d conclude evolution is by definition on an on-going process. Therefore there are exceptions to the rule. And, an exception does not invalidate the rule.

            The fact that 23 year olds (in the USA) might not eat healthy is not evidence the science is not in. If that were the only issue then 23 year olds would not drink or do drugs or have unprotected sex or drive without fastening their seat belts. Human’s don’t learn from other’s mistakes, if so, we’d all be perfect by now.

            Being “skeptical’ about a plant based diet is more a function of marketing than lacking scientific proof. Bombard television nightly and dairy with positive information about a plant based diet…comparable to the message presently promoted about meat and dairy consumption and Americans will understand why they are sickly.

          • Larry G Maloney

            I built a Ferris wheel with my Gilbert 7 1/2 erector set once but I won’t detail it here.

          • Larry G Maloney

            Gar, I haven’t read the challenge but is he asking for ANY negativity, for example, arsenic in apple seeds? Or is his challenge to find an edible plant which has more negative aspects than benefits? Most often The totality of the plant deals with the one negative component or effect, therefore, overall, it’s a “good” food. You usually can’t win betting against someone at their own game. (It’s in the rules.)

          • Gar Zuzik

            I understand Larry about the “ANY”, although I think it is worth stating that there are conflicting studies about the negative impacts of IGF-1.
            Toxins is much more advanced in terms of understanding the biased nature/ completeness of studies though.

          • Larry G Maloney

            Gar, YOU brought up the study. YOU brought up the challenge. I’m simply asking YOU for clarification. Your admission Toxins understands “studies” more than you does not make him knowledgeable about THIS study. In fact he already stated he didn’t read every detail about this study.

  • Larry G Maloney

    ReluctantVegan, I don’t think anyone can delete another’s posts unless the “Other” is an alias and someone is posting under more than one name. If so that person might accidentally post as one alias thinking they are logged in on the other account. If so, that person unwittingly deleted their own alies post.

    To actually delete a post, if desired, the only “correction” I know is to “edit” the unwanted post by actually writing a different message and depleting the original part.

    As far as being logged in as a “guest”, I’d suggest closing out the web site and then open it again and log in your usual way as “reluctant vegan”. If that doesn’t work, the NF staff can guid you through any problems.

    My past posting transgressions are but a learning curve. If I’ve corrupted you in any way I do apologize.

  • Jacob Dijkstra, M.D.

    Considering that flaxseed has a similar protective effect as tamoxifen on breast cancer, what is known about a similar deleterious effect of flaxseed on endometrial cancer as is the case with tamoxifen?

  • Tara

    Hope someone can answer a question that’s been on my mind about flax for a while: is it ok to bake with it? Reason I ask is because I know using flax oil to cook with is a huge no no as it’s a very delicate oil and must be kept in the fridge and away from light. So this made me wonder; is it ok to heat the actual flax seeds (ie, when you cook with them)? Thanks in advance.

    • Thea

      Tara: While I am aware of plenty of sources that talk about how quickly flax oil can go rancid/bad, including with applied heat, I’m not aware of any sources saying that normal cooking/baking with ground flaxseed does anything to hurt the oils in the flax. I think the fiber that you retain protects the fat, even from some heat. I wouldn’t go to the bank with such an assertion, but it makes a lot of sense to me. I know that lots of very health and food safety conscious people make “flax eggs” to bake with. And I know that somehwere on this site, even Dr. Greger talks positively about flax eggs. I don’t think he would do that if there was a problem with it.

      While not a definitive answer, I hope it helps.

      • Tara

        Thank you so much Thea. I really appreciate your response. I’ll continue to bake with my flax and make my “flax eggs” for now! :)

        • Jean

          Grinding flaxseeds is important for allowing your body to absorb the omega-3 fats, called alpha-linolenic acid, it contains. Omega-3 fatty acids can greatly benefit your heart health. However, these polyunsaturated fats are more sensitive to oxygen, light and heat, making them more prone to rancidity. Fortunately, the omega-3 in ground flaxseeds have been shown to remain unaffected when exposed to temperatures of up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, as part of a muffin mix, for two hours. http://www.livestrong.com/article/394798-can-we-cook-ground-flaxseed/

          Found several web sites that say this same information but none of them sited who researched this.

          • Thea

            Jean: Thanks for sharing this info! I hadn’t known that it was (presumably) tested.

  • Violet

    If lignans are so protective and vegetarians and vegans consume so much more of them, why are there higher rates of breast cancer mortality within those populations – as Dr. Gregor himself acknowledges in his video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7KeRwdIH04 at minute 8? He brushes it off by saying, essentially, “Oh vegetarian woman tend to have less children – that explains it.” But I’m concerned that it does not. I think of Linda McCartney for example who was vegetarian for decades AND had four children yet died of breast cancer at age 56.

  • allen cohen

    Dear Dr Greger, I really need your advice on this one. I know and have listened to your wonderful videos on Flax seeds. Today I received an e-mail fro an other web site, named Health Edge, warning men about not to consume Flax Seeds, due to an increase in Estrogen levels possibly affecting a mans virility. Can you comment please on this subject, as I am now confused on the subject.

  • Jennifer

    I am looking for information on PTEN mutations and how diet might improve (or reduce) the risk factors for developing the cancers associated with the mutation. Breast, uterine, thyroid and Kidney. I am looking up all those cancers, but I would be interested in seeing information on diet and PTEN specifically in the future. Thanks for all you are doing! I am about 1-month in to my WFPB diet and I haven’t felt this good in years.

  • Anna Wolf

    I was wondering about the cyanide (? not sure about the translation here) content of flax seeds? I live in Sweden and here they recommend not to eat more than a tablespoon of flax seeds and never to eat ground flax seeds. I have search for info about this on the site and I have also read Dr Gregers book but I cant find any info about if he considers this a problem?

  • Carol Woodward

    Is it ok to substitute flaxseed oil supplement for the seeds or ground seeds

    • VegEater

      Flax oil is missing most of the nutrients that are contained in the seeds. Dr. Greger recommends ground flaxseed.

  • https://plus.google.com/104295493300179271969 Abishek Murthy

    Can you highlight on the role of lignans or Flaxseed on breast cancer for someone who has ER negative but Her2 positive? Does the flaxseed still have some effect?

  • http://www.fdnofflorida.com/ Anthony Llabres

    Hello,

    I am a follower or Dr Gregor and Dr Ray Peat. They diverge on oils for sure. Dr Peat says his studies clearly show PUFA are evil.
    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/unsaturated-oils.shtml

    Dr Gregor has an opposing view. I’m trying to make lifestyle decisions and would appreciate others thoughts

    • Thea

      Anthony Llabres: I don’t know much about Dr. Peat. I clicked on your link. I didn’t read the whole article, but I skimmed a bit of it. The gist seemed to be that vegetable oils are bad things. Dr. Greger does not recommend *any* oils. So, if you stayed away from all oils, it seems you would be doing great from both doctor’s perspectives? Unless Dr. Peat is a proponent of oils high in saturated fat, like coconut and palm oils. I think the evidence against all oils and especially oils high saturated fat is very clear. So, if that’s the sticking point, I would suggest checking out this information for starters: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/saturated-fat/

      • http://www.fdnofflorida.com/ Anthony Llabres

        Thanks for the reply. Dr Peat ciites many studies supporting Saturated fat like coconut oil and some MUFA. He doesn’t support nuts and seeds though.
        I prefer low fat and no soy personally, but I do need fat and I don’t want.it being an issue in insulin resistance. So I’m trying to make a sound decision. They both show studies that support their point. It’s a jungle of studies and opiniins.

        • Thea

          Anthony Llabres: I sympathize with your dilemma. Someone with more energy than I could likely dissect Dr. Peat’s work for you. I hope you find some way to help yourself make a decision.
          .
          I have three more thoughts for you though: Did you know that humans have only two essential fats? An essential fat is one that you need to get from your diet. The two essential fats are omega 3 and omega 6. Your body can make all other types of fat as needed, including saturated fat. Now all, natural fats have some combination of poly, mono and saturated fat. But to think that we need or even benefit from focusing on sources of fat high in saturated fat and low on the type of fat that we absolutely have to have in our diet makes no sense to me.
          .
          Second, you wrote, “…but I do need fat…” Agreed. As explained above, you need to consume small amounts of omega 3 and 6. If I remember correctly, the amount of omega 3 a person needs in a day is equivalent to about 1/4 teaspoon. Recommendations for omega 6 range from 1 to 4 times the omega 3 recommendation–ie, very little. So, here’s the deal: While you need fat in your diet, you definitely do not need to get that fat from extracted (ie: highly processed) oils. Subjecting yourself to the dangers of oils are unnecessary, because whole plant foods have enough fat in them to meet your fat needs. (Consider: corn oil comes from corn. Olive oil comes from olives, etc. Did you know that even veggies like broccoli have fat in it? If you followed Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen recommendations for eating, one person calculated that you might get about 20-25% fat in your diet. And that’s with no oils.
          .
          The final thought is to address your concern about insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the main issue with Type 2 Diabetes. Dr. Greger explains what causes T2 diabetes in the following video – and the answer is *too much* fat, especially saturated fat: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-diabetes/. Eating a diet like Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen or Dr. Barnard’s recommended diet for preventing or reversing diabetes is a great way to avoid T2 diabetes.
          .
          Dr. Barnard has published, clinical trials that showed how people eating a low fat whole plant food diet is 3 times more successful at beating T2 diabetes than people on the standard ADA diet. You can learn more about those experiments here if you are interested: https://www.amazon.com/Neal-Barnards-Program-Reversing-Diabetes/dp/1594868107/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466736548&sr=8-1&keywords=prevent+and+reverse+diabetes. If you want a free program for following Dr. Barnard’s diet (which is generally consistent with Dr. Greger’s recommendations), you can do the on-line 21 day Kickstart program, which includes meal plans and recipes, etc. Let me know if you would like a link to the Kickstart program.