Doctor's Note

For some of the most recent videos on alcohol and cancer risk, see:
Breast Cancer and Alcohol: How Much is Safe?
Breast Cancer Risk: Red Wine vs. White Wine

Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. And check out the other “HHH” videos (Harmful, Harmless, or Helpful?). Also, there are over a thousand subjects covered in the rest of my videos–please feel free to explore them as well!

For more context, check out my associated blog posts: Breast Cancer Survival and SoyEating To Extend Our LifespanBreast Cancer and DietHow to live longer in four easy steps, and Breast Cancer & Alcohol: How Much Is Safe?

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  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. And check out the other “HHH” videos (Harmful, Harmless, or Helpful?). Also, there are over a thousand subjects covered in the rest of my videos–please feel free to explore them as well!

  • Toxins

    I love the dry humor in this video!

  • maybush1

    But, what about the consideration (even with moderate alcohol consumption) of its effect on liver health and brain cells? I would think that liver and brain cell death in healthy people would be a bad thing.

    • Toxins

      I agree, that is why I dont drink alcohol at all

  • BPCveg

    This is a very interesting topic as so many people believe that alcoholic beverages are heart-healthy, despite known cellular toxicity of alcohol. Do we even know for a fact (through randomized trials) if the pure alcohol itself is providing the health benefits or whether the benefits exist for some other reason such as because of the antioxidants present in the plant components of the alcoholic beverages. There is evidence that alcoholic beverages such as wine and beer contain appreciable quantities of antioxidants. Furthermore, it has been argued that antioxidants are beneficial to the heart (see for example “The power of NO”). Of potential relevance is the question of whether alcohol or associated processing techniques (i.e. fermentation) enhance the bio-availability of the antioxidants present in alcoholic beverages? In other words, maybe the grape components in wine have more nutritional value than the equivalent amount of grape before processing.

    • Boxo

      One advantage of wine over grape juice is that it does not cause a sugar spike since fermentation removes most of the sugars. Of course, eating whole grapes would be better. However, the grapes used in wine are very different than those available in the grocery store. The wine grapes often have thick skins and, I believe, are not as enjoyable to eat. Further, the wine health benefit is better if it is organic and the natural pests force the vine to defend itself thereby producing some compounds in the grapes that provide health benefits.

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Please also check out my associated blog post, Breast Cancer Survival and Soy!

  • Crizzly A

    Great. And it shows that if you are taking care of your nutrition aka consider yourself a health freak – it is a big step ahead – as long as you enjoy what you eat and drink! That is my opinion. I eat healthy most of the time, exercise every day and love my glass of wine with my dinner and a non-grata food item once in a while. Thank – great short piece of information.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bruce.gray.710 Bruce Gray

    Of course, the unethical gotcha in this sneak of study is they’ve included a lot of unhealthy people in the health nut category….1 serve of veges? come on! The adverse effects of moderate alcohol intake will be masked by the group’s lower baseline health. If they chose real health nuts, with higher baseline health, then alcohol’s toxic effects would be more obvious.

  • tavit

    I didn’t know that I was health freak for most of my life

  • Ben

    One of the problems I saw in an article (a long time ago) was that the non-alcohol intake group in studies included not just T-total people who never drank but T-totalers who drank an awful lot before practicing abstinence.

    When these two types of non-drinkers were separated the article suggested that those practicing abstinence were worse off health wise than those who drank very little and that those who didn’t drink but didn’t have a history of drinking were better off than moderate drinkers.

    It’s ashame I don’t have the article to hand, or know where to find it and I don’t think it effects your analysis (especially for the study on us “health freaks”) but interesting non the less

  • Russell

    In another video, he links low levels of pesticides to Alzheimer’s. Many, if not most wines likely contain low levels of pesticides. So… maybe not as healthy as he thinks, unless you choose a biodynamic or organic wine.

  • MichaelanneCan

    I am looking for advice in the best diet for a recovering
    alcoholic. I have heard cravings for alchohol might be decreased by consuming
    less grains as they are metabolically the same as drinking most liquor and
    beer. Is this true?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I have never even thought about diet for recovery! Perhaps focusing on diet is just one healthy behavior among many that can help. One study found just that. Alcohol craving in rehabilitation: assessment of nutrition therapy “Patients who received nutrition therapy reported significantly fewer hypoglycemic symptoms, lower sugar intake, less alcohol craving as well as significantly greater nutrient intakes; a greater number abstained from alcohol. These findings indicate that nutrition therapy can aid in the recovery from alcoholism.” I think mindfulness, which of course means something different to us all, plays a large role in recovery or change. Being mindful of our choices, our health, families, relationships, and physical activity. This video discusses research on trans fats and aggression. The results from this study show that the more hydrogenated fats consumed the greater the risk of aggression, perhaps something a recovering alcoholic may want to avoid? Lastly, diet has been found to improve mood.

      Although I am not sure the best diet, choosing more whole foods and more of a plant-based diet could help. Whole grains are just fine and are nothing near similar to the calories from alcohol.

      Thanks again for reposting this great question!
      Joseph

  • MichaelanneCan

    I am looking for advice in the best diet for a recovering
    alcoholic. I have heard cravings for alcohol might be decreased by consuming
    less grains as they are metabolically the same as drinking most liquor and
    beer. Is this true?

  • John Tiffany

    Dr Greger—Your videos and articles
    are great. A question: How do our microbiota get into our gut in the
    first place? As babies do we ingest our mother’s poop? Is everyone’s
    hygeine so poor? Do the bacteria survive our upper digestive tract?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi John. Thanks for all the great questions did you ever get around to posting about the “anti-nutrients” ?

      Here is a study that described babies and gut health.

      I found this line particularly interesting “Thus, maternal dietary and microbial exposures are also crucial to the development of the microbiota early in life, as children may inherit genes with differing potential for predisposition for malnutrition or obesity, based on the diet of their mother.”

      Hope this helps!
      Joseph