Doctor's Note

Smoothies are one of the most requested topics, but for years there seemed to be little pertinent research. I was surprised when I reprised my search this year to find hundreds of studies, so it’s smoothie time! I rarely do such long contiguous video series anymore, but I had neglected the topic for so long I wanted to get them out. So this is the first of five videos I have coming out over the next two weeks. Stay tuned for:

Previous videos that touch on smoothies include:

Other tips on getting children to eat healthier can be found in Tricks to Get Kids to Eat Healthier at Home and Tricks to Get Adults to Eat Healthier.

I also have past videos on the effect of cooking on nutrient loss and absorption:

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  • Noe Marcial

    wow smoothies even better that chew properly! any way we still having to chew properly the other dishes..
    some times i do smithies but others i use a juicer so we can put more carrots more beetroot evermore spinach and celery apples ginger.. than in a normal smothy (with bananas berries and spinach)

    personally i put the fiber that went out two more times in the juicer to extract as much nutrients as possible..
    i know some of nutrients are lost in the fiber.. but is not much fiber left so i spouse some is filter into the juice
    to be honest very few times we use the fiber for something.. anyway its really feel as a boost of energy in the morning the juice.. any opinion about that?

    i wonder if it is any comparison between this large quantity of vegetables juice and a smoothie with less vegetables but with the whole fiber.
    i know about the glucose levels rice in juice , but when the juice is green?

    any way we still drinking booth but the juicing feels lighter like a tea some times and like a immediate boosting wile a smoothie some mornings feels a bit more like a whole meal

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Have you seen his video on juicing removing more than just fiber? If someone is meeting their fruit and vegi intake by eating whole sources then juicing isn’t a concern of mine. And yes some juicers (like twin-screw of something that yields less oxidation) may be better than others. Reusing the pulp is a good idea! Some folks have done crackers in a dehydrator and all kinds of cool things to utilize what they juice.

  • HemoDynamic, MD – NF Volunteer

    Reminds me of Whirled Peas–that’s what the world needs more of!
    Namaste

    • Karl Young

      Wasn’t there a song about that ?

      • John Lemon

        All we are saying is give peas a chance…

        • lilyroza

          What the world needs now is peas, just peas….

          • Rhombopterix

            I get an easy peas-full feeling…

          • Karl Young

            We need to hoist a green smoothie to lilyroza – she picked up on the fragment that was whirling around in my head and inserted John Lennon’s (er. Lemon’s that is) lyrics as well !

    • lilyroza

      Visualize Whirled Peas

    • lilyroza

      That bumper sticker, Visualize Whirled Peas has been around for quite a while. Now at the advent of a green smoothie revolution, we finally have proof that visualization works.

      • HemoDynamic, MD – NF Volunteer

        Lol

  • Scott Beavers

    I will wait to see the other 4 videos before passing judgement.

    • NCharles84

      Ha, Beavers!

  • walterbyrd

    I used to hate green smoothies – until I started using lime.

    Apples, bananas, etc. added sweetness, but the chlorophyll tastes was still there.

    Add lime, crushed ice, and stevia, and it works.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Lime is a great addition. I have a recipe for something similar that’s geared for kids using pineapple to mask the taste of greens. “Shrek” Smoothie works every time! In fact, research even suggests kids eat healthier when eating is fun and they are involved.

      • Thea

        Joseph: re: “I have a recipe for something similar that’s geared for kids using pineapple…” If it would easy, would you share with us? I’m interested! (Are non-kids allowed to drink it?)

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Heck yes they are! I’d make it for the world if I could. I never measure exactly but I use about:

          1 frozen banana
          1 cup non-dairy plant milk (unstained and homemade is best)
          2 cups of chopped kale (remove the stems)
          1 cup of frozen pineapple chunks
          1 ripe pear
          1 orange
          1 cup of green grapes
          1 Tablespoon ground flax (or equivalent amount of any nuts/seeds)

          *Add ice as needed to make cold, but usually if using frozen banana and pineapple it’s not needed. Oh and freezing the grapes before makes it even better I think.

          Truth be told I kind of stole it from the Physicians Committee but tweaked to include the most special ingredient in the world, pineapple! It is a serious game changer. Let me know if you like it?

          • Thea

            Thanks! Looks pretty good. I’m definitely going to try it. I’ll let you know what my inner child thinks.

            Do you have any opinions/experience with using store-bought frozen kale? I don’t usually buy fresh anymore (though I could). I wonder if the frozen would have a stronger green taste for a smoothy or ruin the texture or something???

            re: tweaking from PCRM. I’ve done similar in the past. I’m not a huge fan of smoothies myself, but there was one from PCRM some time ago for mango “lassi”. It was so good and won me some big smiles from family. It also got me hooked on the spice, cardamom. Now I put cardamom in anything I think will work, including my morning oatmeal sometimes.

            Thanks for sharing your recipe. I’m excited to try it.

          • Rhombopterix

            I think you’ve really hit upon a good idea for releasing nutrients….by pre-freezing. What better way to rupture virtually all of the cell walls than piercing them naturally with ice crystals?

          • HaltheVegan

            Thea: I, too, am hooked on cardamom (and black pepper :-) Ever since watching the video at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-natural-killer-cell-activity/ where Dr Greger describes how these spices boost the activity of Natural Killer cells, I use these spices quite often, especially with blueberries. And I also find that the fragrance and taste of cardamom is very pleasing :-)

          • Thea

            HaltheVegan: Thanks for commenting and for the reminder about that video. One of the sad realizations I have come to over the past few years volunteering for NutritionFacts is that I don’t have a good head for remembering this type of information. I’ve seen every video and read every blog on this site and I just can’t keep all of that information in my head. It’s really frustrating.

            I’m with you on cardamom’s fragrance. So exotic and nice. Most pleasing indeed.

          • HaltheVegan

            Thea: Not to worry about not remembering all the details. There is so much valuable information here it is kinda overwhelming. Sometimes I can remember a vague connection, but then have to do a search to find the video or article :-) Thanks for your volunteering and commenting. I learn quite a bit from reading the comments section everyday!

          • Kim Churchman

            Right – these readers are a generous bunch and they share some excellent tips.

          • Kim Churchman

            Old saying: You either know something of the top of your head, or you know where to look it up. Both kinds of knowledge very nice to have.

          • Thea

            Kim, thanks for your very nice thoughts. I get frustrated when I don’t know what I don’t know because I don’t remember. And then I don’t know I can look it up… :-0

          • Devin Wiesner

            Store bought frozen kale is usually blanched before freezing. This blanching destroys the myrosinase that is needed to form sulforphane. The same is true for store bought frozen broccoli and spinach. You can use frozen kale, just be sure to add some fresh cruciferous vegetables to your smoothie to get the myrosinase. I would recommend a leaf of fresh cabbage.

          • Thea

            Devin: Good point! I would still get lots of other nutrients, but why not maximize the benefits? I like the idea of including a fresh cabbage leaf better than the idea of adding some mustard powder. That stuff is strong and sharp tasting! Ick. And I like red cabbage. So, that’s a good idea. Thanks for your comment.

          • B

            Thank you for this and all your excellent feedback, clarifications and followup with NF! I’d been wondering where and when to bring this up…this seems like a place. I’ve been drinking matcha green tea and adding the poder to my smoothies for years now. I get a very high quality organic matcha from Japan. A friend recently sent me this link about green tea and toxic levels of flouride. Do you have any comments or recommendations on this? I love my green tea and always thought, per Dr. Greger’s info on NF, that it was a gift from the gods :) Now I have concerns about it!

          • B

            Oops! forgot to include the link on my Green tea question! http://preventdisease.com/news/10/080610_green_tea_fluoride.shtml

          • HaltheVegan

            B: There was a comment the other day by someone saying: “And avoid green and black tea, both high in aluminum, from what I’ve read.” I, too, am a big fan of green tea, so I would like to know if these toxins are, in fact, of any concern or is it still safe to drink tea. Five cups per day are recommended in this video:
            http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-healthiest-beverage/ entitled “The Healthiest Beverage”.

          • Kim Churchman

            Tea is grown in parts of the world where the naturally-occurring fluoride levels are an overdose for us, so not good to be putting away too much. I don’t know how much is too much. Maybe that’s what he had in mind? Goes for green or black, since both are harvested off the same bush.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Hey, B! Thanks for the link. Excess tea consumption early in life may lead to fluorosis and tea can have aluminum. From this video Dr. Greger mentions World Health Organization recommendations for aluminum. Let me know it this helps?

          • HaltheVegan

            Joseph: Thank you for the “aluminum” link. I had forgotten about that video. It certainly answers my question posed above.

          • B

            Thank you Joseph & HaltheVegan! I must have missed those videos (gasp) hahaha! I was more concerned about the aluminum than the flouride, but forgot to mention that! This greatly eases my mind as I love my green tea :)

            Per the issue of dental plaque in the video…I used to have 3 dental cleanings a year because my plaque buildup was so thick! The dentists all said that some folks just have it that way. After I went vegan 7 years ago, I noticed there was NO plaque buildup on my teeth! Due to money and insurance issues I’ve at times gone several years without a dental cleaning and still no plaque! I used to be able to chip it off in chunks with a paper clip between cleanings. This made me wonder if there was a relationship between plaque buildup on teeth and the plaque in our arteries, but when I asked several dentists, they said no way. However, at a health seminar I attended and telling my story to a young dental technician, she seemed to remember reading something about that relationship. In any event, I’m mighty pleased that since going plant-based my teeth are so much better!

          • Kim Churchman

            The hard stuff that has to be chipped or scraped off actually isn’t what dentists mean when they say ‘plaque’. The reason it’s cleaned off is that under a microscope it’s porous so it serves as a big apartment building for bacteria. I’ve noticed the same nice benefit, although I still get it under my gums. So I like going for cleanings, bc if it’s been too long, then there’s a smell on my dental floss and I can suck it out of my gums – yeccchh.

          • lilyroza

            I drank a lot of green tea and coffee daily from a very young age (4 or 5), my family encouraged it because it was the only way they could get me to drink a little milk. People often remark how white my teeth are, though my skin is on the paler side also. I find it hard to believe tea and coffee cause this in kids. I mean I drank Lipton’s tea constantly.

          • Kim Churchman

            The fluorosis risk is because it comes from some of the parts of the world where naturally-occurring fluoride content is way too high. TX and Mexico, up to 8ppm, Northern Africa in the 30s, Himalayas and eastern China over 60. Artificial water fluoridation: one ppm. Just in case you wondered.

          • Kim Churchman

            Had to smile – poder is ‘to have power, to be able’ in Spanish.

          • Charzie

            Sounds awesome! This is kind of silly, but the other day when I ran out of soy and almond milk and was making a smoothie, it FINALLY occurred to me (despite the fact that I regularly make plant milks myself), that throwing a few almonds and oats into the blender would do as well, with even more fiber! I’ve kinda gotten used to a slightly more textured smoothie adding carrots and other more firm veggies to my mixes, so not a big deal for me to have a bit more. I like to “chew” my smoothies anyway, to mix in the digestive components in saliva, so a good incentive to boot! I actually got off of a SAD diet using smoothies while I learned the ropes of WFPB so I’ve always known they were a game changer despite the ambiguity from various sources.
            I have to make a plug for fermentation too, another serious game changer! Forget the expensive and often ineffective probiotic capsules and powders, it’s so easy and fun to make real food the way it’s been done for centuries! I need to say that “pickling” and fermenting raw food are two ENTIRELY different things, and are too often considered as one and the same! Here is something I just read today to share… http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/amazing-healing-properties-fermented-foods.
            Also, listen to Donna talk about her amazing journey with ferments “My Story” on this page…
            http://www.culturedfoodlife.com/
            The pro though is “Sandorkraut”, ( http://www.wildfermentation.com/who-is-sandorkraut/ ) Sandor Ellix Katz, the author of several awesome books on the topic! Enjoy!

          • Wegan

            Some videos on this site show an increased cancer risk for people who eat a lot of fermented food but maybe it’s the salt. If you add probiotics maybe you don’t need the salt?

          • Charzie

            I know, and I am also very curious why, because my body definitely tells me otherwise! I don’t really use a lot of salt in my ferments, just enough to flavor them and keep the lacto-fermentation moving along, but include lots of herbs, seeds, spices, etc,, as recommended if you limit the salt. I too would LOVE to know the variables involved because I feel so much better using them, and if I stop I will know about it. I’ve battled IBS for too many years, especially since they removed my gallbladder, plus plenty of other issues, that have been almost totally resolved by eating a WFPB diet, but the ferments have completed the job. I have become pretty passionate about it because it has helped so much. I hate seeing foods traditionally fermented being pasteurized or pickled with distilled vinegar being confused with the real stuff because there is just no comparison. There is way more to it than meets the eye! Like I said, we’ve been using this natural spontaneous method of preserving and enhancing our raw food for a long time, but because we have “advanced” to modern practices and shelf stable products, there is very little modern research that is illuminating on the specifics. I hope with all the new info about the importance of our microbiome that someone will investigate, but since it is so easy to do oneself, and there aren’t any patents involved, I doubt there will be much incentive anyway!

          • Devin Wiesner

            If you would like your almond/oat milk to be a bit smoother, soak them the night before in water. I sometimes add a bit of fresh ginger and oddly enough it seems to compliment the taste of the almonds.

          • B

            Charzie, Thanks for this great idea! I too recently got turned on to Sandor and have been making red cabbage fermented ‘Sandorkraut’. It’s so easy and absolutely delicious! Also did an okra ferment and plan on experimenting more. Will be adding some of the kraut (and beets) to my red/purple berry smoothies, which also have hibiscus, cayenne and purple kale…it’s a red thang ;)

          • Charzie

            Awesome! Sounds great! I love beets in smoothies! Fermented of course! :)

          • B

            I do keep the ferments an occasional pleasure my blood pressure is quite sensitive to salt…and as you do, keep the salt to the lowest possible amount that still ferments well! I like roasting a batch of beets, then keep them on hand for various recipes that week. The beet greens are also delicious and nutricious :)

          • Kim Churchman

            The digestive components in saliva are just to begin to turn starches into sugar. Virtually no delay if you just swallow it. I’m ready to upgrade the pulverizing power by getting a better blender, my cheepie’s about shot.

          • LKSkinner

            This sounds extremely yummy!
            My husband will love this, he’s a _BIG_ pineapple fan.
            Question: can you substitute other greens for the kale, like silverbeet (mangold) greens?
            I haven’t had much luck finding kale but silverbeet greens are available.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Absolutely! Sub away!

          • eri

            Gonna try it. I wish there was a kitchen tool specifically for de-stemming kale quickly. Yeah I know a knife or the hand will do it, but I bet there is a quicker way waiting to be made into a tool.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            You may try to grab it by the stem with one hand and with the other hand lightly grip around base of the kale, as you pull through to the tip it should all fall right off :-)

          • Psych MD

            Why no stems? My sister-in-law gave me a huge bag of kale and I’ve just been shoving the whole thing into the blender.

          • Veganrunner

            Me too. Stems grind right up.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Just my personal preference you can totally use the stem!

          • Veganrunner

            Joseph when you got this job did you know you would be dealing with such hard core “nutritarians?” Throw the stem away! With all those nutrients!

          • Jim Felder

            Grab the end of the stem with one hand and make a loose circle around the stem with the other hand and pull. The leaf zips right off. The stem will eventually break when it is weaker than the leaf portion, but this usually happens at the point where the stem is tender enough to eat, so no biggie. I do this before I wash the kale so I don’t spray water all over the kitchen. then I wash it and then chop. If you are going to steam or use it in a smoothie, not need to dry. If you are going to use it in salad as “angry lettuce”, then just spin it in a salad spinner.

            This, BTW, this comes courtesy of Anne Esselstyn and she is a hoot when she demonstrates it.

          • Kim Churchman

            Ditto that, she’s a kick.

          • Thea

            eri: Glad you got some good answers to your question. I thought I would also mention that one of the reasons I love using frozen veggies is that the prep work is already done. Even though you got some good answers, I personally like just opening a bag and throwing in without having to do any de-stemming at all. So, maybe that’s an option for you if de-stemming seems like too big of a pain?

          • Kim Churchman

            I buy my kale at the farmer’s market, and I go through it carefully because too often there are a few or more aphids in it. Or spiders enjoying the aphids.

          • Isaac Matthew White

            What of food combining? Some say that it is bad to mix citrus fruit with vegetables. Some say it upsets your stomach because our body can’t digest citrus fruit with vegetables. Also while I’m at it there is this book by Kimberly Snyder that talks a lot about food combining and adverse effects. It seems like pseudo-science to me, but I keep getting people in the vegan community recommending it to me. Any advice?

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            “Food combining” is lacking research, but if folks who feel like they do better eating some foods alone there is no major concern. I just feel like so many individuals lack the recommended amount of fruit and veggies that any possible way to have them eat more is a good thing! There’s been other conversations about this if you bug me I’ll find the links and you can see what other’s are saying. Thanks, Isaac.

          • UDownWithTPP

            Thanks for stressing homemade nut mylk. That stuff in the carton is GARBAGE! It tastes nasty and is fully of fillers, inorganic minerals, and very little nuts.

          • baggman744

            Thank you! Some of my family are getting into soy/nut milks, etc. I’ve yet to try it. No desire to make it, and every time I pick up a carton and read the ingredients, I put it back on the shelf. There’s just too much “stuff” in there I don’t want/need.

          • UDownWithTPP

            It’s really easy to make almond mylk. 5 cups of filtered water, 1 cup almonds, a pinch of Celtic or other raw salt, maybe a few dates and blend. Use a paint strainer bag to strain out the pulp and you’re done!

          • Thea

            cliff note feedback: Yumm!

            The details if interested: I gave it an honest try, even to the point of buying raw kale and de-stemming. There’s so much food, I started to worry that it wouldn’t all fit in the blender, but after blending half the ingredients, the rest fit and blended just fine.

            And oh boy, I guess they don’t call them green smoothies for nothing. It came out a pretty bright green and I was skeptical that I was going to like it. And sure enough, I wasn’t all that excited about it on my first sip. But I kept at it and by about the 4th or 5th sip, I was hooked. I drank the whole thing (I’m not much of a sharer) by the end of the day. One thing that I really liked about it was the consistency. It seemed to have a nice smooth, thick consistency rather than gritty/fiber separation that I have experienced with other smoothies in the past.

            Thanks for that nice recipe! It’s not going to turn me into an avid smoothie fan-girl, but I really like having a tested tried and true recipe that I know I will like in my back pocket. Seems like it would be especially nice to make for guests.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            A powerful blender makes all the difference! If there is too much kale take it back a notch. Thanks so much for trying! It makes a ton, huh? I like it cold, too. Makes it easier for me to drink (personal preference).

          • Susie

            Sounds lovely – do you peel the orange?

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Yes. I totally peel the orange. However, orange zest offers a lot of protection! Citrus peel protection.

    • Toledo RDN

      Add fresh ginger – that works, too!

  • Daniel

    What about the heat and oxygen introduced into the contents of the blender? Wouldn’t that cause for a loss of nutrients? And with cold pressed juicing it preserves more of the nutrients while extracting all of them

    • mjs_28s

      “What about the heat and oxygen introduced into the contents of the blender?”

      That has always been a strange and kind of poor argument that anti-vegetarians like to counter with when others talk about eating cleaner.

      Plants are filled with anti-oxidants which helps to protect the oxygen sensitive nutrients for some time. This is why you typically hear about trying to consume your smoothies withing 30 minutes for maximum bang for the buck. In short, only make what you will drink right then and there for maximum bang for the buck.

      Even if you let it sit in the fridge all day you may lose some nutrients due to oxidation but with all the other untouched nutrients I wouldn’t sweat it. You still get a great nutrition blast.

      That said, some greens don’t taste well if they sit around too long. I think that it is the chlorophyll breaking down over time. If you make a green smoothie, drink it all in one go. If you are using fruits only, best promptly but you can nurse a container all day for the most part.

      As far as heat – how long are you blending?!? Even before I add ice to my smoothies so they are nice and frosty they aren’t even room temperature. I use cold water to get the mixing going, frozen berries, and then ice.

      “And with cold pressed juicing it preserves more of the nutrients while extracting all of them”

      Oh yes, I love my slow juicer! Often I make a sweet veggy juice in that then use it as the liquid in a smoothie with greens and banana. So tasty. Carrot, orange, apple, and beet for the juice.

    • Israel Navas Duran

      Most nutrients are still nutrients even when oxidised (e.g., particularly antioxidants such as ascorbic acid/ascorbate). Heating food is a different story, but the heat generated by a blender won’t raise the temperature of the blend nearly as much as if you boil the food, and short boiling food still preserves much of most of its nutrients (provided that you also consume the water).

      • baggman744

        I think we’re deep in the weeds here, not that there’s anything wrong with that. Of course you don’t want to over cook veggies, but steaming, boiling, even sautéing, is still exponentially better than a burger, fries, and a coke. And didn’t I read a brown oxidized apple still maintains most of the its nutritio?

  • Will

    What about adding vegan protein powder? Good or bad?

    • mjs_28s

      I think that has been covered but I don’t know in which video.

      the problem is, if I remember correctly, is that you are isolating the protein while removing the good stuff and then artificially adding some of it right back.

      I used to use powders but I stopped cold turkey and I have not had any issues (muscle loss) and I work out the same as ever. I used cronometer:

      https://cronometer.com/#

      to calculate my smoothies and even without protein powder, the stuff I put in there pushes the smoothies to 17 grams of protein so I don’t worry about protein at all anymore. Especially since my intake is about 1/2 what it used to be and I have had zero negative impact on muscle building, endurance, and strength.

      • Will

        thx for the feedback

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I feel it depends. It’s always best to obtain protein from whole food sources. Adding a few nuts or seeds could give you a boost. If you do use a protein powder I’d recommend avoiding soy and whey and going with a pea, rice, chia, or potato protein (or blend). I only tend to recommend this route for folks who definitely are not meeting protein requirements, which in healthy populations is hard to find.

      • VegGuy

        What about hemp protein powder? According to Nutiva, when they cold press the whole hemp seeds into oil, the leftover is hemp protein powder.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Forgot about hemp! Yes, a better choice than soy and whey concentrates.

          • ron

            I occasionaly use a plant based protein powder, only a tablespoon of less, since I have a problem knowing if I really need it. I do like the flavor it adds to a smoothie, preferably vanilla or the new coffee flavor. But since I’m 81 and not very active, I thought it might delay some muscle loss. I don’t eat much meat anymore and very little fish.

          • Charzie

            Ron, no pro here, but I read somewhere (reliable) that we might need more protein and less fat as we age. I would still avoid the powders though, and get it from real food.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Sounds good, Ron. Seems like you’re on the right track! The low end of protein recommendations are between 0.8-0.9g/kg for adults. After 65 years old, based on this study I would suggests bumping up these recommendations.

      • Will

        thx for the response, appreciated.

    • MikeOnRaw

      Bite Sized Vegan (Emily) did an interview recently with Derek Tresize, a vegan body builder, who shared his high protein smoothie recipe. See the comments of the video for the link. No need for protein powders if you are body building as the plants have plenty of it. And if you are not body building it is unlikely you need anymore protein than you get just from eating whole plant foods.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEUTMZ1JTw8

      • Will

        Thanks Mike

      • LKSkinner

        Thanks so much for this link!
        Derek Tresize is pretty amazing, proof that you don’t have to eat animal products to be seriously buff.

      • Thea

        MikeOnRaw: Thanks so much for this link! I had not heard of Bite Sized Vegan before and used this as an opportunity to watch some of her videos. What a great resource!

  • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

    A real planteater without a Vitamix is like a meateater without arteriosclerosis

    • Ann

      Funny! And True!

    • largelytrue

      Are you implying that ‘real’ plant-eaters need a $300+ brand-name blender to be ‘real’ enough in their plant eating?

      • Laloofah

        We’ve been vegan (mostly WF) for 15 years quite happily and successfully without a high speed blender. Didn’t realize that makes us “unreal” plant eaters. ;-)

  • greensmoothieparty

    The oldest green smoothie recipe that I have found so far is at this website:
    http://www.greensmoothieparty.com/waring-go-round.html
    It was developed not long after the introduction of the household blender.

    Cheers!

    • mjs_28s

      Wow. I looked at those smoothies and I don’t think that I could drink a single one of them. Maybe the cucumber one with the pineapple in it, but that would be it.

      I think they thought anything that was sweet = bad!

      Seriously, grapefruit juice (2 cups) and 2 cups of spinach!?! People would look like they were blowing everyone around them a kiss from the perma-pucker.

      • B

        Thank you! I love grapefruit juice and hadn’t even considered such a wonderful combination :))

        • mjs_28s

          you are definitely a stronger person that I am. I cannot come close to handling that much tang / sour!

  • FruitedDragon

    Bananas, strawberries, blackberries, kale, spinach, carrot and broccoli. Right now.

  • janet

    I heard from ‘hippocrates institute’ that they did a scientific study and that the high speed of the blender deludes or dumbs down or disappears (or whatever you call taking away) the nutrients when using blending. They are highly recommending juicing extent. I found this Soooo disappointing because i don’t like cleaning the juicer and blender is so much quicker. Can you confirm or dispute these findings? Thanks a million for all your great work and research!!

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I am not familiar with their research, as far as I am concerned it’s very shoddy science. If you find their study post it we’ll discuss! Thanks.

  • Blanster

    OK now I’m officially confused. I know Dr. Esselstyn says not to “drink” your food, which is contrary to this video. Here’s a quote from his FAQs: “Avoid smoothies. When the fiber is pureed, it is not chewed and does not have the opportunity to mix with the facultative anaerobic bacteria which reside in the crypts and grooves or our tongue. These bacteria are capable of reducing the nitrates in green leafy vegetables to nitrates in the mouth. When the nitrites are swallowed, they are further reduced by gastric acid to nitric oxide which may now enter the nitric oxide pool. Furthermore, when chewing fruit the fructose is bound to fiber and absorption is safe and slow On the other hand, when fruit is blenderized, the fructose is separated from the fiber and the absorption is very rapid through the stomach. This rapid absorption tends to injure the liver, glycates protein and injures the endothelial cells.” Here’s the website: http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/faq/

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I knew we’d see this :-) As much as I respect and value the dedication of Dr. Esselstyn and his work I am not sure this topic has been highly researched? To me, it doesn’t make sense that blending removes the fiber since you still drink whatever went in there. How could it lead to less absorption? Happy to look into more research as it comes out. Anyone here is free to discuss, but let’s try to look at the studies.

      • jj

        “when fruit is blenderized, the fructose is separated from the fiber and the absorption is very rapid through the stomach.” That doesn’t say it removes the fiber just separates the fructose and fiber so that absorption is rapid.

        Smoothies make me feel hungry again too soon so it makes sense to me. I like the satisfaction of chewing food.

        • Thea

          To everyone asking about Dr. Esselstyn’s stance on smoothies: I *highly* respect Esselstyn. But no one is right about everything. I think that Esselstyn has only partially addressed the smoothie question, and (if memory serves) that the upcoming videos in this smoothie series from NutritionFacts does a good job of addressing the issue raised by Esselstyn (and nicely repeated for us by jj).

          Recommendation: I suggest hanging in there for a few more NutritionFacts videos/cliffhangers (argh!). Then, see if you feel that Dr. Esselstyn’s point hasn’t been adequately addressed. If not, I would be very interested in hearing people’s thoughts/debates.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            YES!!! Couldn’t have said it better.

          • Kelly Caiazzo

            I love Dr. Esselstyn, and have a huge respect for the work he has done. That said I’m glad to see some open discussion about the smoothie issue, because it’s been the easiest way for me to increase the dark leafy green consumption for my kids. They love cacao kale smoothies, or collard greens with pineapple. It’s a great way to get them the calcium they need along with all the other nutrients in greens. I’ve realized that most likely, even if it’d be better for them to chew their greens, smoothies are better than trying to get them to eat sautéed greens and failing (or having them eat a few bites vs. drink an entire green smoothie). Pleased that Dr. Greger isn’t concerned about smoothies.

          • Thea

            Kelly: You are making perfect sense. Anyway, I strongly believe that if you expose kids to the tastes when they are younger, in whatever form, they are more likely to grow up liking the stuff later when they can tolerate the foods in more “adult form.”

            re: concern about smoothies. I think there are a few gotchas. I don’t know if I would worry about those gotchas for kids, but you might want to keep watching this series on smoothies to get the whole story.

            And, “cacao kale smoothies”! Lucky kids! I wish I had a mom who fed me chocolate kale smoothies when I was growing up…

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Thanks for correcting me. I’ve also asked Dr. Greger to weigh-in so I’ll say more about this. Do you have a reference to back up that claim? Even if it does the point is drinking a smoothie is convenient and doable for so many folks who suffer meeting the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables. Certainly anyone here is free chew their food and avoid smoothies, no quarrel there. However, my position is since Americans barely even scratch the surface of meeting proper fruit and vegetable intake, as a dietitian I have very little worry about someone drinking a smoothie!

          • jj

            My comment was repeating what Dr. E. said and interpreting it differently than others seemed to and making a personal comment. I have no problem with people drinking green smoothies or anything they want to.

          • Johanna

            Why is it that when I drink a green smoothie, (and I use LOTS of greens,) I feel like I’ve had a shot of caffeine maybe 15 minutes later? I feel *really* good…. Some other folks I work with have noticed the same thing.

    • Andrew F.

      I am inclined to favour the majority of advice from Dr Esselstyn including his stance on smoothies. So far I haven’t found him to make unsubstantiated or lightweight claims. I used to drink smoothies and juices, but I don’t actually require such volumes, especially of fruit. Less is more sometimes. Of course Dr Esselstyn has chosen to focus on what is good for people with coronary artery disease and Dr Gregor has a more generalist pro-vegan interest. So I take advice from both, but as a person with CAD I will likely fall on the side of Dr Esselstyn until such time the latter is disproven. I appreciate the contributions of both Doctors, but I think I sometimes see an unhelpful loyalty to Dr Gregor here which clouds peoples judgement and ability to let others have a differing opinion or god forbid, contradict Dr Greger current viewpoint.

    • brec

      Disclaimer: I follow Dr. Esselstyn’s diet advice.

      I believe, though, that he is incorrect in saying that the “facultative anaerobic bacteria [reduce] the nitrates in
      green leafy vegetables to [nitrites]” and hence incorrect on the importance of chewing, i.e., of mixing the greens with saliva, with respect to generating nitrites. (To add to the confusion Esselstyn’s FAQ mistypes “to nitrates” for “to nitrites”, which is why I have the square brackets in the quote fragment.) Rather, my reading of the research is that nitrates from greens are digested after swallowing and then concentrate in saliva, and then bacteria in the mouth convert the nitrates in the saliva to nitrites. After swallowing those nitrites, they are converted to nitric oxide gas which is beneficial to the arteries.

      Here’s some of the research I’m referring to:

      The nitrate–nitrite–nitric oxide pathway in physiology and therapeutics; Jon O. Lundberg, Eddie Weitzberg and Mark T. Gladwin; Nature Reviews | Drug Discovery Volume 7 | February 2008, 156-167

      Acute Blood Pressure Lowering, Vasoprotective, and Antiplatelet Properties of Dietary Nitrate via Bioconversion to Nitrite; Andrew J. Webb, et al; Hypertension. 2008;51:784-790; online: http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/51/3/784

      Dietary nitrate in man: friend or foe? G. M. McKnight, et al; British Journal of Nutrition (1999), 81, 349–358

      • largelytrue

        It appears that the quote is technically correct, by your admission. Salivary excretion is admittedly a roundabout path by which the nitrate in greens can be transformed by oral bacteria, but it does seem quite plausible that the nitrate in greens can be better released into the mouth by chewing, adding to the reducible pool for at least a little while.

        This older study also looks interesting because it reports that stimulating salivation increased total nitrate in saliva. This may make chewing in general more favorable for nitrite production.

        The allure of the nitrate cycling idea as support for plant-based diets on evolutionary grounds, the timbre of Esselstyn’s public discourse, his age, his precise qualifications and the nature of some of his publications, all have tended to make me doubt his views on nitrate-mouth as a bit on the speculative side — though I admit that for his kind of patient I’d probably want to advocate anything that might be good and which coincides with pretty healthy behavior anyway. Of course I also haven’t investigated deeply because I am not at the brink of a heart attack and my blood pressure is about where I want it to be and my lipids seem to be okay too. I’m not the kind of patient which is featured in Esselstyn’s interventions.

        • brec

          The exact nature of the NO3->NO2->NO cycle is not important to the general “eat greens” message, but it does have some bearing on the question at hand: to smoothie or not to smoothie.

          • Veganrunner

            After listening/watching/reading Dr Esselstyn for many years (as we all have) my general take away has much to do with his patient population. His patients tend to be obese and very sick. For people that are overweight smoothies are probably not a great idea because they do not fill people up for a long time. A similar issue/topic is nuts and fatty whole foods in general. We can get all caught up in to nut or not nut but someone who is 300 pounds overweight and sick should probably deal with that before they eat such calorie dense foods. I suppose if they could stick to just a few. But who can do that!

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            Good point. Esselstyn’s patients was very sick with severe narrowing of the coronary arteries. The cardiologists had nothing to offer – not coronary bypass surgery, not even a tiny stent! One more cholesterol particle in the artery wall and they would have been dead!!

          • Andrew F.

            I have not read anything where Dr Esselstyn’s patients tend to be obese. I attend a specialist lipids clinic for those with a suspected genetic cause of high cholesterol. The first time I went I expected to see a lot of fat people (as I was). I was surprised that in fact the people in the waiting room were trimmer than the average population. The nurses however were often seriously overweight. Common sense says that being overweight is not healthy especially regarding diabetes, but it is a misconception that people who suffer from coronary artery disease are visible by their obesity or even lipid profile. Most are walking around within the normal parameters of weight and lipid profile and the first indication they will get that they have atherosclerosis will be angina or their first (and maybe last) heart attack. I do not eat juices for two reasons. One I don’t want the potential sugar spike, but secondly, even if I did not have CAD I don’t need to chug vast amounts of nutrients and I am not convinced it is healthy to do so.

          • Veganrunner

            Hi Andrew
            You need to watch Forks Over Knives. His patients were overweight. (You can also pull up his research and that give you the info) Can you please post the article that says people with “coronary artery disease are visible by their obesity” is a misconception. I don’t have the time or interest to search but here is a quote from the American Heart Assosciation.

            “Diet and physical activity contribute to overall blood cholesterol levels as well as the cholesterol that is made naturally by the body. But other factors also contribute to your cholesterol. Being overweight or obese tends to increase bad and total cholesterol and lower good cholesterol. Getting older also causes LDL cholesterol to rise. For some, heredity may play a role because high cholesterol can run in families. However, a heart-healthy diet and regular physical activity are important to everyone for maintaining cardiovascular health”

            I will agree that it is possible to be thin and have atherosclerosis. But it would be more unusual to be overweight or obese and have normal cholesterol. Genetic cause is a different story. But….that being said I would guess once you lost your weight and gave up animal product your cholesterol levels dropped. And yes there are exceptions to the rule. But my experience with patients, family and friends is that weight and cholesterol are linked. Lose weight and cholesterol will decrease.

          • Andrew F.

            Veganrunner – I think you are more interested in being right than learning something.

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            You got veganrunner completely wrong – if you want to learn something, then listen to veganrunner.

          • Andrew F.

            I have read Dr Esselstyns book about his experience with his first subjects and I’ve read many times what he says elsewhere. That I recall, he does not make an issue of or state that his patients were obese. Perhaps they were, but he does not make an issue or talk about it. He doesn’t even require his patients to exercise.

            I watched one of Dr Gregers videos “40yr old vegan dies of heart attack”. And he goes on to say how the lipid profiles and heart events are similar for vegetarians and meat eaters. There is much of this tye of evidence on the net. Veganrunner states they have no interest or time to look it up. In the same token, I have no interest in spending hours hammering a point home.

            Of course you are not doing yourself any favours by being fat, but there is lots of common sense evidence out there that demonstrates you cannot tell if someone has coronary artery disease by how obese they are…and Dr Esselstyn doesn’t seem to mention obesity, let alone make an issue of it. Dr Esselstyn is interested in what food a person puts into their mouth and in not damaging the endothelium. Weight loss is a side effect of eating better.

            Veganrunner – I’ll be sure to let both my senior cardiologist and lipids professor know of your advice that I probably do not have a genetic cause of my high cholesterol. I am sure you are well qualified to make that statement. Even after I had lost weight and reduced my lipid profile and had good blood pressure readings they said that they could tell very little by these gauges and the later calcium score on a ct cardio scan did put me in the top 10% of those most likely to have a heart attack and to have so much plaque in my 50s shows aggressive life-long plaque growth. Incidentally, when I left school I weighed 53kg and was skinny most of my life. I was fat comparatively briefly. I ate badly most of my life though. The people in the waiting room at my lipids clinic – skinny, my two friends who had heart bypasses – skinny (but smoked and ate badly).

            My objection is the assumption that Dr Esselstyns patients were obese. In an age of greater obesity now, some probably will but. But it is not a good way to differentiate between those with CAD and those without.

            I must go and unsubscribe from this site now because life really is too short for this and to keep replying would feed the problems here. And Dr Greger – I really didn’t care whether you had a beard or not.

          • Veganrunner

            I think he might be a bit sensitive. That’s ok.

            No word from Vitamix yet. I’ll give them a call after the holiday weekend. (Your email box is full)

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            OK – thanks. I will delete some mails!

          • Veganrunner

            Good morning Andrew,
            Have you watched Forks Over Knives? If you haven’t you would really enjoy it.

          • largelytrue

            I think we both agree on that.

  • Mery Daae

    I would take this with caution, my experience with green smoothies is every time I try to have one, I throw up in the following hour or two. No nausea, nothing, just a bodily reflect (despite being that kind of people who normally can’t throw up even if necessary). Having leaky gut/IBS/gut flora imbalances I have oxalate intolerance and putting too much greens concentrated like that affects me greatly. Actually, I can’t take spinach at all. There’s a considerably big amount of people like this as I’ve found out through a yahoo group and apparently following a low oxalate diet has helped many with intestinal problems and even other syndromes like fybromialgia, autism… As a plant based eater, I’m not following that approach too closely or I’d be left with nothing to eat, but avoiding very high oxalate containing food does help, and green smoothies are a no no for me (for now, I guess if I healed my gut if would be another story?).

    • Thea

      Mery: re: “…for now, I guess if I healed my gut if would be another story?” I love this last line of your post. It’s so positive and open minded. I bet you will heal your gut! I’m rooting for you!

  • janet

    I’m 100% into the vegan thing and so glad that your science is finding this. Re – Hippocrates – I can’t find the cite where he talks about what he says about smoothies, but others are responding to his ‘supposed research’ and saying that it is not scientific etc. so – i’m finding same answers. Smoothies are good – drink them to get your veg and go for it. Thanks!!

    • Psych MD

      Here is a video from a few years back with Brian Clement, Director the The Hippocrates Institute and self-proclaimed health expert. Among the highlights, he says: “90% of nutrients are gone within the first minute and a half of blending,” (whether that is true or not, 90 seconds is much too long, anyway), “never, EVER combine fruits and vegetables,” one “cannot digest blended foods” and they thus go on to “ferment” in your gut. In other presentations he alludes to a study showing that whipping oxygen into the food with a blender causes an oxidative reaction, destroying the nutrition, yet offers no published reference. I side with Dr. Greger, although Clement does have much better hair.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SCFFZSlm2o

      • Charzie

        Um, I hate to be too rational, but I hardly think our prehistoric ancestors evolved separating their food choices, this just makes no sense to me. What would be the the point while foraging for whatever is available for survival, to only eat one or the other? I’m not surprised this guy has no science to back him up, it’s just silly.

        Fermenting in the gut? That’s what we have a microbiome for, and it knows what to do. Unless of course it’s a SAD diet replete with rotting meat in our herbivorous intestines! Even there, some may be more or less tolerant, but I’m certainly not…animal products rot!

        As for the blending of anything, I don’t have good teeth, so eating hard crunchy foods would be very poorly macerated if I never blended, and I am sure all the antioxidants in the mix will counter any “reaction”, as unlikely as that seems. I know from personal experience that it certainly works for me on many levels, so I have a hard time “swallowing” some of these rationales. Even if they were true, I still think it is better to get the good stuff into us than to forgo it… whatever works!

      • Israel Navas Duran

        That explanation sounds like pseudo-science.

        • Psych MD

          You may be giving him too much credit.

  • Janine

    I’m also officially confused, I have been following Dr Esselstyn’s advise http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/faq/ SMOOTHIES

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      My comment, below.

  • Psych MD

    Here is an interesting comment from the latest McDougall Newsletter. Dr. McDougall appears to at best have a neutral attitude toward greens, asserting that they are too “nutrient dense”, are contaminated with heavy metals, and supply excessive amounts of protein. This is certainly the first time I have heard anyone discourage their consumption:

    “Starches, like beans, corn, potatoes, and rice are high-yield, inexpensive to produce, and can be stored for decades for later use. Thus, these conventional foods, not greens, are the bulk of the natural human diet. Dieters should not forgo bread and potatoes for platefuls of kale, nor should they force down Brussels sprouts rather than enjoy rice and beans. Make micronutrient-dense “green vegetables” side dishes rather than main dishes, as they provide color and flavor, and their various repugnant chemicals boost our defenses against common diseases.”

    • Lawrence

      Thank you for bringing Dr. McDougall’s latest newsletter to our attention, which may be read in its entirety here:
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2015nl/aug/superfoods.htm

      My impression of Dr. McDougall’s longstanding dietary advice is that it stems (pardon the pun) from a bit of controversy between the ‘Nutritarian’ (Fuhrrman) vs. ‘Starchivore’ (McDougall) approach to a plant-based lifestyle, an example of which may be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdxVfi632Xw

      I find Dr. McDougall’s advice to be sound, seasoned and science-based. My mental image is one of a deep keel (starchivore) on a small boat (nutritarian) in choppy seas. Both are necessary, but the deeper the keel the smoother the ride.

    • JosephOlstad

      “force down Brussels sprouts”!?…I need to make Dr. M a plate of my Brussels Sprouts and he won’t need to force anything down.

      • Laloofah

        I highly doubt Dr. McD “forces down” Brussels sprouts, but that he’s speaking to – and about – the majority of his readers who are likely to have that attitude. I used to, till I was convinced I just needed to learn how to cook them properly (they aren’t my mother’s overcooked Brussels sprouts!)

  • viennagirl

    Bottom line – smoothies are calorie dense while the feeling of satiety is short lived. For weight control, smoothies are a bad idea. However, if gaining weight isn’t a problem – even a desired result as in the elderly or children, smoothies are a great idea! So for example, in our home, my husband gets a smoothie, but I don’t – well, maybe just a taste!

    • greensmoothieparty

      I notice that some fat added to a green smoothie (1/4 avocado or some walnuts) increases the satiety factor. The other benefits of adding a bit of fat may include improved absorption of the fat soluble vitamins and generally slower digestion. I also use Dr. Greger’s tweak of including some frozen amla slices to reduce the glycemic response. Sometimes, however, it can be nice to keep it small and simple like using an orange, romaine, a couple of ice cubes and some almond milk. Cheers!

      • Charzie

        For me it’s a meal replacement and I almost always add a small amount of oats, beans, or nuts for satiety.

    • MikeOnRaw

      I feel like people who don’t feel full on a smoothie are not getting in enough calories with their smoothies. I get in 800 to 1200 calories in with my breakfast smoothie primarily of whole fruits and I’ll tell you, I’m pretty full and that feeling lasts well through to lunch.

  • Okay, I have one other question to weigh into the mix…. I’m a big fan of smoothies, but have always wondered about potential reactions of mixing several organic acids together. For example, I add amla, cloves, berries, leafy greens, almond milk (each of which contains ample phytonutrients), but do phytonutrients ever affect one another? If so, they certainly would in a high speed blender.

    Might be a hard question to ask, but I’d love to see if there’s any examples out there. What do others think?
    Maybe this produces bad resulting reactions? Maybe good? I’ve really been curious.

    • Psych MD

      I suspect the nutritional effects would be additive. In some cases, as mentioned above, there is synergy, such as fat and fat soluble vitamins or green tea plus lemon. I follow Dr. Greger’s lead and include as many different foods as I can fit into my Nutribullet and sweeten it up, if need be, with erythritol (actually Truvia which is erythritol plus 1% stevia). I had been frequently adding cocoa until I read about the heavy metal contamination. I have put my coca consumption on hold until hearing further from this site.

      • Uh-oh. Can you send me the heavy metal contamination information? Cocoa is a daily one for me.

        • Psych MD

          The info is from Consumerlabs.com which is a subscription service. I’ll see if I can reproduce some of the findings.

          • Psych MD

            I tried to cut and paste but the info is copyrighted. Consumerlabs is a valuable source and I don’t want them banning me. Suffice to say that their findings gave me pause. Of particular concern were levels of cadmium and lead found in a large percentage of products tested, including several brands I have used, including Trader Joe’s, Hershey, and Ghirardelli. More recently I had been buying bulk cocoa from WinCo at a fraction of the price. However, since the name brands were questionable I figured generic powder was unlikely to be less tainted. Hopefully Dr. Greger will put this issue into perspective.

      • Fred
        • Psych MD

          Great links. Thanks.

  • Panchito
    • Veganrunner

      Panchito thanks for the reminder. I rinse mine right after using so no need for scrubbing. If it needs more I put a lemon rind in some water and blend away. I have gotten rid of all my plastic containers years ago. I too wish it was glass but when I inquired they said with the speed of the blades it was a safety concern. It truely is an amazing machine. And I don’t normally get passionate about an appliance.

      However I do share your concern. Hopefully they can/will address this issue as well. Fingers crossed.

  • MikeOnRaw

    Glad to see some research behind the blending and looking forward to the other videos. Smoothies are what really were able to get me to see the possibility of changing to this lifestyle. I don’t have a lot of time, and a smoothie allows me to get enough calories in at a meal, without having to spend 2 hours eating.

  • Suzanne

    I’m not much of a smoothie person because I would rather eat than drink my calories. I think it’s more satisfying to eat than drink. But I tried the recipe that was in the video and it was really good and I am full! I used fresh mint from the garden and that really made it.

  • Thank you for another great video! Here’s a yummy whole food green smoothie recipe. xo https://cleanfooddirtygirl.com/easy-tips-to-make-heathy-eating-stick/

  • Israel Navas Duran

    I can easily figure a few draw backs of blending most of your food (particularly fruit and vegetables): higher glycemic index meals causing higher insulin peaks, partial atrophy of chewing muscles, greater risk of tooth cavities, lack of room for the permanent teeth (e.g. wisdom teeth) in the case of children, higher predisposition to carotenosis/carotenemia/xanthoemia/carotenodermia, even higher risk of constipation.

    • 2tsaybow

      The atrophy takes place in children’s mouths is because they don’t nurse and bottle feeding doesn’t take as much physical work. When children nurse their lower jaw and entire mouth works harder and they are less likely to have an overbite and there is greater development of the palate so there is room for the permanent teeth. This happens as the head and mouth develop in infancy and early childhood. It’s the nursing they need. By the time the child is old enough to drink a smoothie, it would be a bit late.

      Also, there is not going to be a problem with insulin peaks in smoothies because all that fiber is present in the food. Watch Dr. Greger’s video on apple juice vs sugar water and you will see the problem that happens when fiber is not present: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/apple-juice-may-be-worse-than-sugar-water/ Smoothies will not cause cavities because sugar added to food causes cavities, not whole plant foods without added sugar.
      As for the idea that smoothies will make you constipated, this is not true because, as always, it is the fiber in the fruits and vegetables that keep you from having many problems with elimination. Fiber is particularly good and resolving any problems with constipation.

  • Elizabeth

    Had your daily dose of teflon today? Oh, the web that is Vitamix… I was on the verge of purchasing one, when I read that the Vitamix was (is) leaking small particles of teflon into peoples food! I checked into it, and sure enough, Vitamix is aware of the issue, but claims that it is something like “FDA food grade teflon” and totally safe for your daily intake (????!!!!) and that it does not affect every blender (as if that made it ok that it affects random blenders).

    It has taken them some years from what I understand to finally address the issue, and they plan to have it fixed with new blenders at some point, but how disturbing that the company knew, tried to hide it, and took so long to fix it. When I tried to comment on an affiliate site and ask more in depth questions about the issue, my comment was deleted. How on earth is teflon safe for anyone? Worst of all, why did they hide the information?

    • Veganrunner

      Good to know Elizabeth.

    • jj

      Interesting. I have an old Vitamix with the stainless steel container. It is not as versatile as the newer ones but does everything necessary. When buying an Oster got one with a glass container. No plastic for me. Never bought a food processor as they are all plastic. Besides I like whole food simply prepared.

    • Veganrunner

      I just emailed them regarding these issues. I’ll let you know what they say.

    • Veganrunner

      Hi Elizabeth,
      I contacted Vitamix and they have come up with a fix for the black specks. They started having them available about 3 weeks ago. As far as the glass pitchers in the future I was told the blades go too fast and that would be a safety concern. Thanks for the heads up. I have a new one coming!

      • Thea

        Veganrunner: Thanks for this tip! Do you have to see black specks to get a replacement or is it available to everyone with a Vitamix???

        re: the glass pitcher answer. I have never bought this answer. It makes no sense to me. The blades never get anywhere near the pitcher and the force of swirling liquid just can’t be that much, not with the heavy-duty glass that we can make today, like with say pyrex that can go from freezer to microwave. Does Vitamix’s answer make sense to you? What am I missing?

        • Veganrunner

          I am not sure about the black specks answer. I tested it and had black specks so they are replacing it. You are right about the glass answer. They supposedly came up with a new pitcher because enough people complained. Hopefully we will get a glass one eventually.

          • Thea

            Veganrunner: Thanks for the reply. I’ll just have to call them and see what their test is.

            re: glass. The problem is that while there are some other blenders out there with glass pitchers, none that I have seen come close to the performance that we get from the Vitamix. For example, I researched the one that someone on this discussion linked to. It says right there on their product page that blending fully frozen food will shorten the life of the product. You are suppose to partially thaw food before blending. Can you imagine? In my book, that type of warning makes it clear that that particular blender is nowhere near the class that Vitamix is.

            Of course, not everyone can afford a Vitamix or simply do not want one or care a lot about the plastic issue. I totally respect other people’s priorities. One of the things I really admire about David Gabe (cookbook author and cooking class instructor) is that he tests every single one of his recipes in a $30 blender just to make sure the recipes work (and even though I think he has a Vitamix). He wants to make sure that all of his food is accessible to people of just about any income bracket. I really respect that.

            Have a good day!

  • Bill_der_Berg

    We know that that frozen vegetables can be more nutritious than other store-bought veggies, It would be interesting to know if the freezing process does anything to weaken the cell walls.

  • eri

    Looking forward to the follow up. I hope Dr Greger can bring broccoli into the mix, so to speak. In previous videos Greger showed that broccoli that was bought frozen can be heated and then cut and mixed with mustard power and let sit for a while to improve nutritional absorption when eating it. How about when using broccoli in smoothies? Is it a good idea to first heat/thaw the broccoli and then blend it with mustard power and some water, let sit for a while and only thereafter add the other ingredients and blend the smoothie? Or would it be as effective to heat/thaw broccoli and add mustard powder and everything else in one go and let the blended mix sit for a while before drinking? Sorry for the detailed questions but I’d really like to know.

  • vegank

    Thanks for this video, looking forward to the next one as well.
    I confess to resorting to taking my child to a fast-food restaurant several years ago, to get him to drink from a straw, before we finally got to the healthy smoothie stage. It paid off and he accepts green smoothies now. Having a sensory disorder , without smoothies he’d never try anything that does not feel or smell right so it was worth trying ! I must try the recipe with the pineapple as well.

  • Wade Patton

    I used to live on green smoothies. But grew weary of eating so many pounds of fruit. I’m finding WFPB much easier and better balanced.

    Reminded myself just this week of that “problem”. I made a banana-chocolate smoothie and froze it for dessert one evening. I forgot to eat it that night and took it to work the next morning to eat on the way to the job (as passenger). I ate it and it was delicious, BUT it made me hungry for the rest of the day. Gnawing hunger that went right through my two potatoes (baked) as well as the fruit and nut mix that I always carry for lunch and snacks.

    Starting the day fruit-smoothied just cranks my metabolism into overdrive. Be aware of this. Have WF snacks ready to fill-in.

    I’ll be more careful next time (extra potatoes). Hunger like that can cause one to look at less-desirable “food” choices when he is away from home.

    • charles grashow

      Banana-chocolate smoothie -it was probably extremely low fat. My breakfast smoothie contains fat which increases satiety.
      Avocado, full fat kefir,walnuts, egg yolk plus fruit a. 1–% dark chocolate

      • largelytrue

        Does it increase the satiating efficiency on a per-calorie basis? Fat is well-established as the least satiating by this measure if you look at the literature, from what I see. I examined some of the references on this topic in an earlier comment on a different video, but my impression is that it’s generally common knowledge.

        • charles grashow

          All I know is that my smoothie keeps me feeling full for 5 hours or so. Around 600-700 calories or so.

    • Lawrence

      Hey Wade, check this out. Be sure to read the August 2014 newsletter:
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2015nl/may/getout.htm
      Regarding endoscopic examination, I think my ‘NO’ meter just got pegged:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intracolonic_explosion

      • largelytrue

        Regarding endoscopic examination, I think my ‘NO’ meter just got pegged:

        Just because of a brief description of a nasty thing on Wikipedia? Without any clue about frequency or preventive measures? What about the effect of preparing the bowel? Heck, what if you decided to fast for a day or two just to address this risk? Would it disrupt your life severely? More than the change in the risk of cancer might?

  • A propos of the question of letting smoothies sit in the fridge: Is it true that a well-closed jar of a green smoothies is significantly less healthful when consumed 12, 24, or 48 hours after its creation? We find it so very convenient to make a double portion one morning and drink the second part the next day. Hooray for Dr. Greger’s Smoothies Series. Can’t wait!

  • Veggie Eric

    Hi NF team, I was looking for a video specifically about cavity re-mineralization and what foods specifically help heal cavities. I read about peppermint oil and alove vera but nothing on specific foods to help keep teeth strong and healthy. Maybe a good topic for a future video? Please and thank you!

    • Thea

      Veggie Eric: I’m greatly interested in this topic too! Hopefully there is some good science out there that Dr. Greger could report on.

      Dr. Greger has reported on food that can weaken the enamel. So, one thing we can do to help is stay away from those foods or better, brushing immediately after eating those foods. But that’s not the same as finding out which foods (if any) can specifically build up the enamel. Thanks for your question.

  • Darth Drummond

    What about saliva? I thought I read that unless you “chew” your smoothie, you do not produce enough saliva which is an important process in getting all the nutrients. I now add chi seed and sunflower seed to my smoothie after I blend it so I have to chew it.

  • Ketan Pandya

    In impression that masticating juicers are going to be better in terms of reducing the oxidation that is caused due to centrifugal juicer and blenders, also killing some of the enzymes at the temperature generated due to high RPMs can be avoided. Is that true? Is it better to let go some of the fibers in the form of pulp (with the thick strainer, I still get to see a lot of pulp that I have to literally eat the juice) while using this slow squeezing masticating juicer. If someone can tell me which one (blender or slow squeezing masticating juicer) is better, it will be useful to me in the future the way I consume my raw vegetables/fruits. Thank you.

  • Anthony Dissen, MA, RD

    I know that some like Dr. Esselstyn are not the biggest fans of smoothies and blended foods due to concerns that consuming these blended foods may damage the endothelial cells in our digestive tract. But my assumption is that if the food is “chewed” in the mouth and mixed with saliva, it would be more kind to the digestive tract than if it is gulped down. Any insight or thoughts on this matter? Thank you!

    • deborahrabbit

      So, a year later, and I was hoping that by now this was addressed. I see other relative info, but I was very interested in the question of Esseltyn’s ideas, as you asked.

      • deborahrabbit

        Well then. Apparently my laptop didn’t load many comments before I wrote first reply, and now see way more comments from last year addressing this… so in the words of emily litella, nevermind.

  • Dr. Gregor, thank you again for producing these films. I have a question I would love your help on. You mentioned that putting healthy fats and berries help to improve nutrient absorption and prevent a blood sugar spike, if I recall well. Can you pls give us some guidance on how much it is necessary to have per serving, in order to get these effects? Thanks so much! Judy

  • baggman744

    I wish to convey my personal warnings again about raw veggies, especially to the young, elderly, and those with immune weaknesses: samonella and E. coli are real and dangerous risks. The E. Coli from Costco chicken recently in the news has caused more than just discomfort, in fact renal failure for some. A freind’s kids recently were sickened with one of these two, don’t recall which. The parents had some diarrhea, not much more. The CDC investigated, and could not find the source. This time I yelled at them, you drink your smoothies, cook the damn spinach for the kids, at least until they get older. Parents are old enough to assume the risks, the kids (under 8) are not.

  • Yoshimi_nz

    Very nice information!!

  • Susie

    Any more recipes, people?

  • Gary Franklin Dunn

    Must admit I’m not at all convinced from what Dr. Greger has said about
    the benefits of smoothies (except as an occasional variant or treat)! Other WFPB doctors (McDougall, Esselstyn) also appear to be nonsupportive. It
    seems to me that serious questions remain about liquifying in terms of
    the fiber content & the rate of absorption of sugars &
    nutrients & the positive role of the mouth in digestion. Most healthy old people in the Blue Zones don’t drink
    smoothies! In addition, I think an argument against regular smoothies is that to be a long term vegetarian you need to learn to seek out & enjoy many, many vegetables in their nearly unprocessed state. Besides, in doing so you save money not buying all those specialty blenders.