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Deep Frying Toxins

Volatile toxins created by deep frying may pose a respiratory risk.

September 14, 2010 |
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Acknowledgements

Image thanks to Kristin.

Transcript

Frying is not just bad because it destroys more nutrition and oil is such a waste of calories. We should never deep-fry foods because of the toxic volatile carcinogens that are produced. In fact we shouldn’t even let anyone deep-fry in our house. Like second-hand smoke, they may be putting your whole household at risk because of the air pollution created by deep frying. If they insist, though, we definitely want to open the windows, keep the kitchen ventilated.
And some oils, are worse than others. What’s the worst oil to deep-fry with? Canola, coconut, safflower, or extra virgin olive? The worst is coconut. The worst is coconut oil, which should not be used, period.
What’s the least harmful?…, Canola was the oil generating the least amount of potentially toxic chemicals.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

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Dr. Michael Greger

Doctor's Note

Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. And check out the other videos on cooking methods. Also, there are 1,686 other subjects covered in the rest of my videos--please feel free to explore them as well!

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  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/editor-d/ editor d

    So how do you feel about a little olive oil in a stainless steel pan for cooking up say a stir fry? Something in the area of a couple tablespoons. If that’s no good then what do you recommend? BTW I love this site.

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/toxins/ Toxins

      Try cooking with water. I do and the vegetables turn out the same consistency

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michelle-Luna/501170754 Michelle Luna

    This video is titled “deep frying” but does this also apply to normal frying? I love coconut oil for all its topical uses, and my roommate recently started using it in the frying pan, in place of butter/nonstick spray. A few friends of mine told me that this is dangerous as it becomes carcinogenic (they said it especially happens with cold-pressed oils). Are they right? Thanks.

    • Toxins

      Coconut oil is covered by Dr. Greger. It is indeed an unhealthy food to use, as are all oils.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-coconut-oil-good-for-you/

      Coconut oil manufacturers constantly point a finger to the medium chain saturated fatty acids being used for energy expenditure and therefore not being disposed of as fat in adipose tissue. Coconut oil does indeed contain medium chain fatty acids and this may be metabolized differently but there are very few studies to make the conclusion that coconut oil is “ok” or that medium chain saturated fats are negligible. A tablespoon of coconut oil has about 12 grams of total saturated fat. about 8 grams of this is medium chain saturated fat and about 3.7 grams of this is long chain saturated fat. We have an abundance of evidence concluding that long chain saturated fats are harmful so we cannot consider this oil a healthy option based on that alone.

      As far as minerals and vitamins go, there is not one significant vitamin or mineral in coconut oil. The only vitamin present in a tablespoon of coconut oil is .1 micrograms of vitamin k which does not even register as a percentage of daily value. Its also absent of any omega 3 fats. Just looking at coconut oils nutritional profile we see that it is clearly a junk food. Junk food is by definition empty calories.

      http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fats-and-oils/508/2

  • Frances Morey

    What about peanut oil? It was suggested to me because of the smoking point being the highest of the oils.

    • Toxins

      Peanut oil is extremely rich on omega 6, with a ratio close to 4400:1 of omega 6:3. An adequate ratio is 4:1 so this far exceeds what we should strive for. This is important because if the ratio is off, then omega 3 ALA cannot be converted to DHA and EPA.

      • Liz

        0_0 IM afraid to sak about Canola oil, but I may learn something

  • Patricia Dula Bartee

    I work in a restarant that changes there deep fryer grease 1 time every 2 weeks. I have asthma and before the 1st week is out I’m using my rescue inhaler. This has been going on for years now. Is this dangerous to my health?

    • Tamzin

      NO SH*T, SHERLOCK. quit!!!

  • Luc

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24344977 This study including the use test with coconutoil, finds less acrylamid after fying with saturated fats. Coconutoil should do rather well then, right?

  • Kayla

    Canola oil is extracted from rape seeds, high in omega 3 which at high temperatures turns into trans fats. Worse than saturated fat for cholesterol levels. Canola oil should only be used unrefined, cold pressed, and for salads as all omega 3 oils denature at 325F or 160C. As advised by Dr. Greger avoid deep frying.