Doctor's Note

To watch more videos on arthritis, you can check out:
Turmeric Curcumin and Rheumatoid Arthritis
The Cilantro Gene
The Inflammatory Meat Molecule Neu5Gc
Potassium and Autoimmune Disease
Turmeric Curcumin and Osteoarthritis

Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. For more information on the role that diet can play, please see Diet and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Also, there are 1,686 other subjects covered in the rest of my videos--please feel free to explore them as well!

For some context, please also check out my associated blog posts: The Science of Acai Berries and Hibiscus Tea: The Best Beverage?

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  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. For more information on the role that diet can play, please see Diet and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Also, there are 1,449 other subjects covered in the rest of my videos–please feel free to explore them as well!

  • working at it

    Question about how to consume the rose hips: Bought a pound of dried whole organic rose hips ($9.30). These are too hard and crunchy to just eat., and they contain hard seeds. Am trying to soften some in hot water, but doubt the seeds will soften enough. Could easily grind them, which is what the researchers used…..powdered rose hips. And what? put the powder in soups or tea? Suggestions appreciated!
    Mary

    • marthala

      I just searched (via Yahoo; usually google) on rose hips use recipes; this one looks like a good start:

      How To Use Rose Hips

    • jj

      Powdered Rose Hips are really easy to use. http://www.mountainroseherbs.com

  • slwernet

    I see you didn’t get any answers here. I am reading about this for the first time and am wondering if you found how to eat them on your own? I have osteo arthritis in multiple joints and 2 joint replacements! Thanks.

    • Laurie K.

      Rose hips have a mild sweetness to them, and as another viewer commented, they are also hard and crunchy…which makes them a great alternative to croutons for your salad. Another way to enjoy them is in oatmeal or oat bran. Typically, I soak the rose hips in the cereal overnight in water and then put a seed or nut milk on them in the morning and they are wonderful. I also soak them alone in water and just eat them with a spoon, drinking the remaining liquid. Besides B12, l don’t like to supplement, and rose hips (depending on their preparation) contain a good source of vitamin C. Other flowers also contain vitamin C, including hibiscus, which can be purchased in tea form or dried like fruit (though delicious this way, be careful to avoid those that have sulfites and sweeteners added). These flowers also contain nutrients that can help protect us from disease, see for example: http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/is-hibiscus-tea-good-for-you/. I hope you experience a good response with rose hips, and remember to consult with your prescriber for his/her recommendations on dosing, etc.

  • working at it

    Have not found out yet…..just noticed the bag of rose hips still sitting in the cupboard too. Remain interested though.

  • slwernet

    http://homecooking.about.com/od/jellyrecipes/r/blfruit15.htm I found this link that tells how to strain the seeds out through a sieve. I don’t have a sieve…..Are they the size of cherries? I am wondering if they could be cooked to soften and then eaten plain and just spit out the seed. I could maybe eat them this way just for the health benefits.

  • working at it

    The seeds are about the size of a grain of quinoa……too numerous in each hip to spit out. Sieve could work…. The recipes are not helpful to me, having a bag of dried hips with seeds inside. Am thinking to try “blending them”, seeds and all. Will be looking for a better way next time…

  • Laurie K.

    Rose hips have a mild sweetness to them, and as another viewer commented, they are also hard and crunchy…which makes them a great alternative to croutons for your salad. Another way to enjoy them is in oatmeal or oat bran. Typically, I soak the rose hips in the cereal overnight in water and then put a seed or nut milk on them in the morning and they are wonderful. I also soak them alone in water and just eat them with a spoon, drinking the remaining liquid. Besides B12, I don’t like to supplement, and rose hips (depending on their preparation) contain a good source of vitamin C. Other flowers also contain vitamin C, including hibiscus, which can be purchased in tea form or dried like fruit (though delicious this way, be careful to avoid those that have sulfites and sweeteners added). These flowers also contain nutrients that can help protect us from disease, see for example: http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/is-hibiscus-tea-good-for-you/. I hope you experience pain reduction with rose hips, but don’t forget to consult with your prescriber for his/her recommendations.

  • sarah

    Hi,

    I am wondering if there are any herbs that I should stay away from with autoimmune disease (Rheumatoid Arthritis). I am currently taking turmeric, and drinking holy basil and licorice tea as they are anti-inflammatory, but I was cautioned that I want to make sure I’m not overdoing it with herbs and I don’t know if any have counter productive reactions…Any and all info is appreciated

    • guest

      I’d go to the Johns Hopkins lupus center website….they suggest garlic should be avoided by all people with lupus (and other autoimmune issues, i think). They actually list a few “natural” foods to avoid.

  • Changeisgood

    HELP….I see the last question was 2 years ago. I didn’t see any great responses about how to make the rose hips more palatable. It’s doubtful that many will just eat these extremely hard, ill tasting rose hips just dried. Eating them as is, is pretty harsh. What about
    just grinding them up into a powder and adding to foods this way? What about making tea with the suggested 10 berries per day dose?

    • Karen

      I just bought a pound of organic dried seedless rose hips from Starwest Botanicals online. The person who suggested using in place of croutons on salad must have never tried to eat them. They have sort of a plastic texture and are not easily chewed. I plan to put them in VitaMix smoothies. Of course I’ll never know if I feel less pain if it was the rise hips or the turmeric/black pepper almond milk I’ve started to drink daily. Pain and swelling relief takes precedence over a personal well controlled trial

  • Annette

    I would like to know if Osteoarthritis is included in the realm where chicken and eggs are to be avoided for Rheumatoid arthritis sufferers’…….also, is turkey and duck included (all being fowl)? I would gladly give up chicken and eggs for a significant decrease in Osteoarthritis pain.

    • Toxins

      It would not hurt you to test the theory out and abandon all poultry based products for at least a week or 2 to see if you have nay benefit.

  • Ted Crystal

    A good way to enjoy rose hips is by making rose hips tea (infusion). Grind the rose hips (about 8) in a spice grinder and place in cold water in a covered pot. slowly bring to boil. Turn off heat and steep for 5 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a mug and enjoy.

  • Karen Harris

    In answer to all these questions about how to add rosehips to diet….
    I buy a one lb bag of organic rosehips from Mountain Rose Herbs via Amazon, all split into a few pieces with some seeds and a few small twigs mixed in, and some seeds still attached to some of the pieces.
    I sort through them by hand to remove twigs and seeds, and then I soak them in a jar in water in the fridge
    They soften up and increase in volume.
    I add about a tablespoon or so of the softened rosehips to oatmeal or smoothies with all the other ingredients.
    They add a little tartness, which is pleasant with the other fruit in your mix.
    They are too hard to eat “as croutons on salad” as one comment suggested.
    I don’t see how anyone could sift the loose seeds out, especially since some are still attached to the pieces of hip, but will easily pull or rub off by hand. Some of the pieces of hip are as small as the seeds, and you would have to find a strainer with holes the exact right size that would strain out the loose seeds without too many of the small pieces of hip.
    I used to put dry hips in a VitaMix with smoothie ingredients, but there was always a grittiness from the very finely ground, but still very hard rosehips.
    Hope this helps.

    • Karen Harris

      Oops, correction…. they’re from Starwest Botanicals, not Mountain Rose Herbs… $13 from Amazon Prime, or $11 Amazon Subscribe&Save.
      It’s getting as hard to remember where I buy different things as it is to find space for, and remember where I stored, all the different ingredients in my freezer, fridge, and pantry since switching to a whole-food, plant-based diet (-: