Avoiding Other Banned Pesticides

Avoiding Other Banned Pesticides
5 (100%) 3 votes

Industrial pollutants in the food supply may help explain the link between dairy consumption and Parkinson’s disease.

Comenta
Comparte

Anyway, DDT was banned in 1972, and replaced by the insecticide dieldrin, subsequently found to be so toxic it was outlawed in 1974. But it’s still around, and appears to be why every single prospective study on dairy consumption and Parkinson’s disease shows more milk means more Parkinson’s. “Though dieldrin has been banned, humans continue to be exposed to the pesticide through contaminated dairy products and meats due to the persistent accumulation of the pesticide in the environment.”

What else can these persistent pollutants do? Just from the research published over the last year: linked to endometriosis, fibrosis, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease mortality, and even gum disease.

When pregnant women eat lots of animal products, because of these pollutants in animal fats, they risk having babies with smaller brains, lower intelligence, poorer attention span, other cognitive impairments, and more pediatric respiratory infections. The more of the DDT metabolite DDE women are exposed to, the fatter their daughters may become when they grow up. “Prenatal exposure…may contribute to the obesity epidemic in women.”

Toxic waste exposure in the diet may even result in fewer men in the world. Pregnant women exposed to the most PCBs were 33% less likely to have a boy, and we’re not sure if that’s because the PCBs damage male sperm or male embryos. But if having a baby girl is more important than your health, bulking up on PCBs may do it for you, and fish and other aquatic animals provide about three-quarters of human PCB dietary exposure. And the same with dioxins. Fish are the main culprit. 

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

Image thanks to C. G. P. Grey via Flickr.

Anyway, DDT was banned in 1972, and replaced by the insecticide dieldrin, subsequently found to be so toxic it was outlawed in 1974. But it’s still around, and appears to be why every single prospective study on dairy consumption and Parkinson’s disease shows more milk means more Parkinson’s. “Though dieldrin has been banned, humans continue to be exposed to the pesticide through contaminated dairy products and meats due to the persistent accumulation of the pesticide in the environment.”

What else can these persistent pollutants do? Just from the research published over the last year: linked to endometriosis, fibrosis, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease mortality, and even gum disease.

When pregnant women eat lots of animal products, because of these pollutants in animal fats, they risk having babies with smaller brains, lower intelligence, poorer attention span, other cognitive impairments, and more pediatric respiratory infections. The more of the DDT metabolite DDE women are exposed to, the fatter their daughters may become when they grow up. “Prenatal exposure…may contribute to the obesity epidemic in women.”

Toxic waste exposure in the diet may even result in fewer men in the world. Pregnant women exposed to the most PCBs were 33% less likely to have a boy, and we’re not sure if that’s because the PCBs damage male sperm or male embryos. But if having a baby girl is more important than your health, bulking up on PCBs may do it for you, and fish and other aquatic animals provide about three-quarters of human PCB dietary exposure. And the same with dioxins. Fish are the main culprit. 

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

Image thanks to C. G. P. Grey via Flickr.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This