Does Eating Obesity Cause Obesity?

Does Eating Obesity Cause Obesity?
5 (100%) 10 votes

The implications of chicken now having ten times more fat and calories.

Comenta
Comparte

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One reason poultry intake has been associated with weight gain may be that chickens, these days, are mostly fat—up to three times more fat than protein. See, now we confine animals, genetically manipulate them, pump them full of growth promoters, deny them exercise.

How fat have our chickens got? According to the USDA, a hundred years ago, a serving of chicken may have had only 2 grams of fat per serving. Now, there may be over 20 grams of animal fat per serving—twice the amount of fat that’s in ice cream. Chicken now has ten times more fat; so that could help explain why chicken has been tied to human abdominal girth; no viral explanation necessary.

In fact, the chickens themselves may be technically obese, raising the concern: does eating obesity cause obesity in the consumer? A chicken carcass now contains two to three times the energy coming from fat, compared to protein. “Parents may think they’re…feeding their children a low-fat product, as it was [when they were kids], but [instead] are unknowingly feeding their children on a high-fat product. The cocktail of gene selection for fast weight gain, lack of exercise and high-energy food available 24 hours a day, is a simple and well-understood recipe for obesity [in these birds].” 

Farm animals used to make DHA, the long chain omega-3 fatty acid important for the brain, but fast-growing animals fail to fully synthesize it in their muscle. This reversal in fatty acid status in intensively reared chickens is described as a most unusual new phenomenon. It is likely to be the result of this genetic selection for fast growth outstripping the biosynthetic process.

To obtain the same amount of DHA from intensively reared chickens today as would have been obtained in the 1970s, one would be required to eat six whole chickens—like 9,000 calories. These researchers, at the Institute for Brain Chemistry, go so far as to suggest that this may be, in part, why we’ve seen skyrocketing human mental illness.

Although the intensification of chickens alone cannot be responsible for this rise in human brain disorders, they consider it part of the package of changes in our food system that has ignored human nutrition.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Erik Viggh via Flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

One reason poultry intake has been associated with weight gain may be that chickens, these days, are mostly fat—up to three times more fat than protein. See, now we confine animals, genetically manipulate them, pump them full of growth promoters, deny them exercise.

How fat have our chickens got? According to the USDA, a hundred years ago, a serving of chicken may have had only 2 grams of fat per serving. Now, there may be over 20 grams of animal fat per serving—twice the amount of fat that’s in ice cream. Chicken now has ten times more fat; so that could help explain why chicken has been tied to human abdominal girth; no viral explanation necessary.

In fact, the chickens themselves may be technically obese, raising the concern: does eating obesity cause obesity in the consumer? A chicken carcass now contains two to three times the energy coming from fat, compared to protein. “Parents may think they’re…feeding their children a low-fat product, as it was [when they were kids], but [instead] are unknowingly feeding their children on a high-fat product. The cocktail of gene selection for fast weight gain, lack of exercise and high-energy food available 24 hours a day, is a simple and well-understood recipe for obesity [in these birds].” 

Farm animals used to make DHA, the long chain omega-3 fatty acid important for the brain, but fast-growing animals fail to fully synthesize it in their muscle. This reversal in fatty acid status in intensively reared chickens is described as a most unusual new phenomenon. It is likely to be the result of this genetic selection for fast growth outstripping the biosynthetic process.

To obtain the same amount of DHA from intensively reared chickens today as would have been obtained in the 1970s, one would be required to eat six whole chickens—like 9,000 calories. These researchers, at the Institute for Brain Chemistry, go so far as to suggest that this may be, in part, why we’ve seen skyrocketing human mental illness.

Although the intensification of chickens alone cannot be responsible for this rise in human brain disorders, they consider it part of the package of changes in our food system that has ignored human nutrition.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Erik Viggh via Flickr

Nota del Doctor

Check out these videos for more on other genetically modified foods:
Are GMOs Safe? The Case of Bt Corn
Are GMOs Safe? The Case of Roundup Ready Soy
Is Monsanto’s Roundup Pesticide Glyphosate Safe?
GMO Soy & Breast Cancer

And check out my other videos on obesity

For further context, also see my associated blog posts: Poultry Paunch: Meat & Weight Gain and Diet & Cellulite.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This