Hot Dogs & Leukemia

Hot Dogs & Leukemia
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How much cancer risk can be avoided through lifestyle change?

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We do have to put this risk into context, though. Our children are seven times more likely to develop a brain tumor eating just a single hot dog a week than using a cell phone. In fact, if our children insist on wanting to be Oscar Mayer wieners, they are multiplying their odds of getting childhood leukemia by 950%.

Diet is the #1 cause of cancer. Cancer is, therefore, a preventable disease, but it does require major lifestyle changes. Only 5-10% of cancer is in our genes, our family history. The other 90 to 95% of cancer risk is caused by what we expose our bodies to.

Of the 90-95%, tobacco contributes about a quarter of the risk in the United States. There are some infectious causes—particularly in people with AIDS—but diet, if you include obesity and alcohol, makes up about 50% of our cancer risk. And cell phones, air pollution, X-rays, everything else, all just fits into that last 10-15%.

Anything about our diet in particular? From a massive new study in Canada last year, total meat consumption was directly related to the risk of not only stomach cancer, but colon cancer, and rectal cancer, and pancreatic cancer, and lung cancer, and breast cancer, and prostate cancer, and testicular cancer, and kidney cancer, bladder cancer, and more leukemia as well.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to stu_spivack via Flickr.

We do have to put this risk into context, though. Our children are seven times more likely to develop a brain tumor eating just a single hot dog a week than using a cell phone. In fact, if our children insist on wanting to be Oscar Mayer wieners, they are multiplying their odds of getting childhood leukemia by 950%.

Diet is the #1 cause of cancer. Cancer is, therefore, a preventable disease, but it does require major lifestyle changes. Only 5-10% of cancer is in our genes, our family history. The other 90 to 95% of cancer risk is caused by what we expose our bodies to.

Of the 90-95%, tobacco contributes about a quarter of the risk in the United States. There are some infectious causes—particularly in people with AIDS—but diet, if you include obesity and alcohol, makes up about 50% of our cancer risk. And cell phones, air pollution, X-rays, everything else, all just fits into that last 10-15%.

Anything about our diet in particular? From a massive new study in Canada last year, total meat consumption was directly related to the risk of not only stomach cancer, but colon cancer, and rectal cancer, and pancreatic cancer, and lung cancer, and breast cancer, and prostate cancer, and testicular cancer, and kidney cancer, bladder cancer, and more leukemia as well.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to stu_spivack via Flickr.

Nota del Doctor

Check out these videos for more on the link between meat consumption and cancer:
Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death
Caloric Restriction vs. Plant-Based Diets
Carnitine, Choline, Cancer, and Cholesterol: The TMAO Connection

And check out the prequel Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

Also, be sure to see my associated blog posts: Breast Cancer and Diet and Adding FDA-Approved Viruses to Meat.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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