Industrial Carcinogens in Animal Fat

Industrial Carcinogens in Animal Fat
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The buildup of industrial toxins in the meat and dairy supply may, in part, account for the relationship between animal fat consumption and disease.

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Let’s start with two Harvard studies rolled into one. After studying more than 100,000 people, they found that bacon and chicken consumption may double our risk of bladder cancer. Same with pancreatic cancer—a horrific disease. Long Island women who ate lots of barbeque have up to 47% greater odds of getting breast cancer.

It appeared to be the grilling, the frying, that really seemed to kind of cancer up the meat. But this other study, published a few months earlier, found that for endometrial cancer, at least, it didn’t matter how the meat was cooked. And it didn’t matter if it was red or white meat. In fact, those eating poultry and fish had the highest risk for cancer. Seems the only healthy fish may be some fanciful creature made out of dark green leafy veggies.

Another 35,000 women were studied. They concluded that women, both pre- and postmenopausal, who ate the most meat had the highest risk of breast cancer. Interestingly, the acknowledgements for the study show that an earlier analysis was funded by the Meat and Livestock Commission. Evidently, when they found out the results, they weren’t quite as enthusiastic in their support.

The Harvard Nurses Study.  Eat lots of dairy, and double our risk of a heart attack. Or, feed our kids lots of dairy, and triple their risk of colorectal cancer 65 years later. More dairy, more prostate cancer. More testicular cancer. More Parkinson’s disease—all, again, published within about a 12-month period. And this is no fluke. Every single forward-looking study in history on Parkinson’s and dairy found that the more dairy products people consume, the higher their risk of getting Parkinson’s. My father has Parkinson’s; it’s a terrible disease.

But why? Why more cancer? Why more disease? What is in animal products that may be so toxic it can cause enough brain damage to trigger Parkinson’s? Well, we can start with the industrial carcinogens that tend to build up in animal fat. Just how are dioxin levels affected by a so-called “vegetarian regime”? Vegetarians had significantly lower levels in their blood.

In fact, that’s how scientists study the dangers of living near something like a trash incinerator; they studied vegetarians, because the omnivores buy dioxins at the grocery store. So, to know how much toxic waste a community is exposed to, you study the vegetarians, who aren’t bringing dioxins in from outside, and swallowing them at home.

What about PCBs? Scientists looked at the diets and feces of vegans versus omnivores, and, not surprisingly, meat-eaters were found to flush much more of this serious carcinogen through their systems.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to theirhistory via Flickr.

Let’s start with two Harvard studies rolled into one. After studying more than 100,000 people, they found that bacon and chicken consumption may double our risk of bladder cancer. Same with pancreatic cancer—a horrific disease. Long Island women who ate lots of barbeque have up to 47% greater odds of getting breast cancer.

It appeared to be the grilling, the frying, that really seemed to kind of cancer up the meat. But this other study, published a few months earlier, found that for endometrial cancer, at least, it didn’t matter how the meat was cooked. And it didn’t matter if it was red or white meat. In fact, those eating poultry and fish had the highest risk for cancer. Seems the only healthy fish may be some fanciful creature made out of dark green leafy veggies.

Another 35,000 women were studied. They concluded that women, both pre- and postmenopausal, who ate the most meat had the highest risk of breast cancer. Interestingly, the acknowledgements for the study show that an earlier analysis was funded by the Meat and Livestock Commission. Evidently, when they found out the results, they weren’t quite as enthusiastic in their support.

The Harvard Nurses Study.  Eat lots of dairy, and double our risk of a heart attack. Or, feed our kids lots of dairy, and triple their risk of colorectal cancer 65 years later. More dairy, more prostate cancer. More testicular cancer. More Parkinson’s disease—all, again, published within about a 12-month period. And this is no fluke. Every single forward-looking study in history on Parkinson’s and dairy found that the more dairy products people consume, the higher their risk of getting Parkinson’s. My father has Parkinson’s; it’s a terrible disease.

But why? Why more cancer? Why more disease? What is in animal products that may be so toxic it can cause enough brain damage to trigger Parkinson’s? Well, we can start with the industrial carcinogens that tend to build up in animal fat. Just how are dioxin levels affected by a so-called “vegetarian regime”? Vegetarians had significantly lower levels in their blood.

In fact, that’s how scientists study the dangers of living near something like a trash incinerator; they studied vegetarians, because the omnivores buy dioxins at the grocery store. So, to know how much toxic waste a community is exposed to, you study the vegetarians, who aren’t bringing dioxins in from outside, and swallowing them at home.

What about PCBs? Scientists looked at the diets and feces of vegans versus omnivores, and, not surprisingly, meat-eaters were found to flush much more of this serious carcinogen through their systems.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to theirhistory via Flickr.

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