Lycopene Benefits: Raw vs. Cooked Tomatoes

Lycopene Benefits: Raw vs. Cooked Tomatoes
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We should prepare vegetables in whichever manner entices us to eat the greatest quantity.

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Other studies just out show the same phenomenon. Roasted almonds healthier than raw. The cholesterol-lowering effect of all sorts of good veggies improved by cooking. This new study found that long-term raw foodists had low levels of the phytonutrient lycopene, compared to the general population. Lycopene is the wonderful cancer-fighting red pigment in tomatoes. Well, cooked tomatoes provide four times more lycopene than raw tomatoes.

And, cancer prevention is just the beginning. Tomato juice can lower our bad cholesterol 13%. Can successfully treat seasonal allergies, and may even help treat asthma. Treating asthma with tomato sauce. But, when we eat tomatoes raw, we’re losing 75% down the drain.

Raw foods are not necessarily healthier. My recommendation is to prepare vegetables in whichever way will get you to eat the most of them.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Garry Knight via Flickr.

Other studies just out show the same phenomenon. Roasted almonds healthier than raw. The cholesterol-lowering effect of all sorts of good veggies improved by cooking. This new study found that long-term raw foodists had low levels of the phytonutrient lycopene, compared to the general population. Lycopene is the wonderful cancer-fighting red pigment in tomatoes. Well, cooked tomatoes provide four times more lycopene than raw tomatoes.

And, cancer prevention is just the beginning. Tomato juice can lower our bad cholesterol 13%. Can successfully treat seasonal allergies, and may even help treat asthma. Treating asthma with tomato sauce. But, when we eat tomatoes raw, we’re losing 75% down the drain.

Raw foods are not necessarily healthier. My recommendation is to prepare vegetables in whichever way will get you to eat the most of them.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Garry Knight via Flickr.

Nota del Doctor

For more on phytonutrient absorption in raw and cooked foods:
Raw Veggies Versus Cooked for Heart Disease
Kale and the Immune System
Second Strategy to Cooking Broccoli

And for more on the benefits of the phytonutrient lycopene:
Treating Asthma With Fruits and Vegetables
Why Might Vegetarians Have Less HPV?
The Fruit Whose Juice Is Healthier

Also, check out Raw Food Diet Myths.

For more context, check out my associated blog post, Stool Size and Breast Cancer Risk.

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