Reversing Cognitive Decline

Reversing Cognitive Decline
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Exercise shown to reverse mild cognitive impairment.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

If you or anyone you know is currently starting to suffer from cognitive decline—starting to forget things, starting to repeat things—there is some exciting new research published this year. They took folks with mild cognitive impairment, and had them exercise 30 minutes a day for six months, versus a control group that just stretched for half an hour every day, instead of exercised.

Here’s the data. They did a test of cognitive performance at the beginning, and then repeated it at the end of six months. As you can see, in that six-month period, those not exercising—just stretching—continued to decline. At the end of six months, both men and women got fewer correct answers than they did when they started.

Now, what they were hoping for is that by adding exercise, they could slow down this decline. So, if instead of just stretching every day, if they were doing aerobic exercise instead, getting some blood to their brain, maybe they’d only decline half as much—or ideally, not at all—stay the same, have zero fewer correct answers.

But this is what they found, instead. The cognitive decline reversed—they actually did better at the end of six months than when they started. Drugs can’t do that; exercise can.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

If you or anyone you know is currently starting to suffer from cognitive decline—starting to forget things, starting to repeat things—there is some exciting new research published this year. They took folks with mild cognitive impairment, and had them exercise 30 minutes a day for six months, versus a control group that just stretched for half an hour every day, instead of exercised.

Here’s the data. They did a test of cognitive performance at the beginning, and then repeated it at the end of six months. As you can see, in that six-month period, those not exercising—just stretching—continued to decline. At the end of six months, both men and women got fewer correct answers than they did when they started.

Now, what they were hoping for is that by adding exercise, they could slow down this decline. So, if instead of just stretching every day, if they were doing aerobic exercise instead, getting some blood to their brain, maybe they’d only decline half as much—or ideally, not at all—stay the same, have zero fewer correct answers.

But this is what they found, instead. The cognitive decline reversed—they actually did better at the end of six months than when they started. Drugs can’t do that; exercise can.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Nota del Doctor

For more on the benefits of exercise, check out these videos:
Exercise vs. Drugs for Depression
Is It the Diet, the Exercise, or Both?
Preventing Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress With Watercress
Longer Life Within Walking Distance

And check out my other videos on cognition

For more context, also see my associated blog posts: Alzheimer’s Disease: Up to half of cases potentially preventableNatural Alzheimer’s Treatment; and Treadmill Desks: Stand Up For Health.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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