Toxins in Cooked Potatoes?

Toxins in Cooked Potatoes?
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Natural glycoalkaloid toxins concentrate in the skins of potatoes.

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Any other natural toxins to consider? Well, potatoes produce these natural insecticide compounds called glycoalkaloids to keep potato beetles from nibbling on them—they’re not stupid. So, bad for beetles though—but what about us?

Well, a number of dietary risk assessments have been published lately, and although these glycoalkaloids are thought to be the most highly consumed natural toxin in North America, people have been growing potatoes for 7,000 years—currently the fourth largest food crop in the world.

Major review just published; what do you think? Now, this is for a baked potato—not fried, no butter, no cheese, no sour cream, no salt. Just a plain baked potato. Bad? Neither? Or good?

Well, we already know they’re not good, from before. But true safety, or false sense of security? Asking the question of “vital importance,” are potato glycoalkaloids dangerous to humans? This discussion suggests they are indeed toxic, and this problem should no longer be ignored. Okay, then.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Any other natural toxins to consider? Well, potatoes produce these natural insecticide compounds called glycoalkaloids to keep potato beetles from nibbling on them—they’re not stupid. So, bad for beetles though—but what about us?

Well, a number of dietary risk assessments have been published lately, and although these glycoalkaloids are thought to be the most highly consumed natural toxin in North America, people have been growing potatoes for 7,000 years—currently the fourth largest food crop in the world.

Major review just published; what do you think? Now, this is for a baked potato—not fried, no butter, no cheese, no sour cream, no salt. Just a plain baked potato. Bad? Neither? Or good?

Well, we already know they’re not good, from before. But true safety, or false sense of security? Asking the question of “vital importance,” are potato glycoalkaloids dangerous to humans? This discussion suggests they are indeed toxic, and this problem should no longer be ignored. Okay, then.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

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