Arsenic in Rice

Arsenic in Rice
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Ways to decrease one’s arsenic intake from rice.

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What about white rice? Came free with the broccoli in garlic sauce you just ordered. Better than nothing? And the answer is no. Put some brown rice in your rice cooker, and it will be done by the time the delivery person arrives.

If brown rice is so good for you, and white rice is pretty much a waste of calories, why not just eat rice bran, which is part of what is taken away from brown rice to make white rice? Bad idea? Doesn’t matter either way? Or, great idea—you get all the good stuff concentrated together?

Unfortunately, you also get the bad stuff concentrated together as well. Plants grown in waterlogged soil can absorb arsenic found naturally in the environment, and it concentrates in the bran.

Does that mean we shouldn’t eat brown rice? No. But if you eat a lot of rice, I would encourage you to buy U.S.-grown rice, as it tends to have lower arsenic levels than Asian- or European-grown rice.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Calgary Reviews via Flickr.

What about white rice? Came free with the broccoli in garlic sauce you just ordered. Better than nothing? And the answer is no. Put some brown rice in your rice cooker, and it will be done by the time the delivery person arrives.

If brown rice is so good for you, and white rice is pretty much a waste of calories, why not just eat rice bran, which is part of what is taken away from brown rice to make white rice? Bad idea? Doesn’t matter either way? Or, great idea—you get all the good stuff concentrated together?

Unfortunately, you also get the bad stuff concentrated together as well. Plants grown in waterlogged soil can absorb arsenic found naturally in the environment, and it concentrates in the bran.

Does that mean we shouldn’t eat brown rice? No. But if you eat a lot of rice, I would encourage you to buy U.S.-grown rice, as it tends to have lower arsenic levels than Asian- or European-grown rice.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Calgary Reviews via Flickr.

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