Body Odor & Diet

Body Odor & Diet
5 (100%) 5 votes

A study of the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness.

Discuss
Republish

And finally, getting to the gold: the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness. Not just body odor, but body odor attractiveness. Seventeen male odor donors were on a meat or non-meat diet for two weeks, wearing axillary pads to collect body odor. They taped pads into their armpits all day, all night. And then the researchers made them wear an extra layer of clothes to get them even riper. Then after two weeks, they took 30 young women and had them sniff the pads all fresh and drippy. Fresh odor samples were assessed for their pleasantness, attractiveness, masculinity, and intensity by 30 women. Then they repeated the study. Same guys, but just switched their diets around; same poor women. And just to digress here before I unmask the results, to keep up the suspense, the guys were paid cash—2,000 Czechoslovakian koruna for the inconvenience of having to eat a non-meat diet for two weeks. But the women who had to sniff all those pit pads—they were not paid for their participation. All they got was a chocolate bar.

Anyways, back to the results. Who had the most pleasant, the most attractive body odor? The meat-eaters or the non-meat-eaters? The results showed that the odor of donors when on the non-meat diet was judged as significantly more attractive, more pleasant, and less intense. This suggests that meat consumption has a negative impact on perceived body odor hedonicity—pleasure. Vegetarians smell significantly more pleasurable. I’m saying masculinity, by the way, but less smelly, more pleasant, and significantly judged as more attractive.

The one-liner takeaway from this study could be that meat is the pits. This may actually help explain the findings of University of Canterbury researchers this year. This study became an international media sensation: “Vegans say sex with meat-eaters stinks.” My favorite take was probably this tagline in a Canadian paper: “You eat meat? No sex for you.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

And finally, getting to the gold: the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness. Not just body odor, but body odor attractiveness. Seventeen male odor donors were on a meat or non-meat diet for two weeks, wearing axillary pads to collect body odor. They taped pads into their armpits all day, all night. And then the researchers made them wear an extra layer of clothes to get them even riper. Then after two weeks, they took 30 young women and had them sniff the pads all fresh and drippy. Fresh odor samples were assessed for their pleasantness, attractiveness, masculinity, and intensity by 30 women. Then they repeated the study. Same guys, but just switched their diets around; same poor women. And just to digress here before I unmask the results, to keep up the suspense, the guys were paid cash—2,000 Czechoslovakian koruna for the inconvenience of having to eat a non-meat diet for two weeks. But the women who had to sniff all those pit pads—they were not paid for their participation. All they got was a chocolate bar.

Anyways, back to the results. Who had the most pleasant, the most attractive body odor? The meat-eaters or the non-meat-eaters? The results showed that the odor of donors when on the non-meat diet was judged as significantly more attractive, more pleasant, and less intense. This suggests that meat consumption has a negative impact on perceived body odor hedonicity—pleasure. Vegetarians smell significantly more pleasurable. I’m saying masculinity, by the way, but less smelly, more pleasant, and significantly judged as more attractive.

The one-liner takeaway from this study could be that meat is the pits. This may actually help explain the findings of University of Canterbury researchers this year. This study became an international media sensation: “Vegans say sex with meat-eaters stinks.” My favorite take was probably this tagline in a Canadian paper: “You eat meat? No sex for you.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Can our lunch contribute to our fragrance? For more on body odor and diet, see: Eggs and Choline: Something Fishy.

Then check out Asparagus Pee for another funky odor video.

For additional context, check out my associated blog post: Increasing Muscle Strength with Fenugreek.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

 

16 responses to “Body Odor & Diet

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. You point out the sexism in the study compensation, but what struck me is why they didn’t simply have men and women producing the samples (could have even asked already committed vegetarians), and to have both men and women smelling the samples. And why just focus on body odor attractiveness, instead of body odor offensiveness to determine what is least-offensive all round? What a bizarre study. Maybe what is more important is the seasonings? Tumeric and garlic smell, coffee or cigarette breath is brutal.  I can often tell that people have eaten curry the night before, and its not so pleasant a smell when it isn’t coming hot out of the oven.




    0



    0
  2. I understand that men generally have a stronger body odor, and women, generally have a better sense of smell, so that made sense to me. I have to add that since going vegan, and especially since adopting a mostly whole food, and 30-50% raw diet, my sweat smells significantly sweeter, and less pungent/ unpleasant. Michael Greger, you are one funny guy, and I always enjoy your “Nutrition Facts”. Thank you.




    0



    0
    1. More than just smell. My husband began to colour the bed sheets yellow and his pillowcases had to be soaked in Napisan to get them white again. Yes, the bedroom smelled too. We started sleeping in separate rooms.
      Once we went vegan this stopped. He smells normal again. Have you heard of this before? He is quite embarrassed by it and wont let me tell people!
      Liz




      2



      0
  3. CZK are Czech crowns, not Czechoslovakian crowns. The Czech Republic and Slovakia separated 20 years ago and Slovaks now use euros whereas Czechs have stayed with crowns. Just to be a little informative, unrelated to diet though :)




    1



    0
  4. hello sir
    my name is yogesh from India
    actually my power lifting strength is very low i want to lift heavy and heavy weight.
    please suggest me what food i need most or what to take in supplements thats increase my lifting power




    1



    0
    1. yogesh: I’m not a body builder, so I don’t have specific suggestions for you. However, I think you will want to check out the following site:

      http://www.plantbuilt.com/

      If you look in the profiles (at least the one that I looked in), the very successful vegan body builder athletes share which supplements they use.

      Why do I think they are successful? Here’s a quote from an article about that team:

      “The Plant Built (PlantBuilt.com) team rolled into this
      year’s drug-free, steroid-free Naturally Fit Super Show competition in Austin, TX, and walked away with more trophies than even they could carry. The Plant Built team of 15 vegan bodybuilders competed in seven divisions, taking first place in all but two. They also took several 2nd and 3rd place wins.”

      Hope that helps.




      0



      0
  5. My husband and I were surprised to discover after dancing half the day in the hot sun wearing closed toed shoes, our feet had no odor. Literally zero odor… as if we had just gotten out of the shower. -Came to this website, typed in “body odor” to search and voila. Like many other happy surprises attributable to having been vegan for a year now and vegetarian prior to that.




    0



    0
  6. I found this most interesting only because I know two Vegan’s who do not use Deodorant of any kind and they have the strongest odor I have ever smelled. It’s un bearable and of course they are in it so they don’t smell it. Makes me wonder if they are not eating the proper Vegan foods.




    0



    0
  7. I’ve been vegan for two years and recently I’ve gotten really bad b.o for quite a few months now. Not much has changed in my diet besides the fact that I drink a lot more water and am healthier.




    0



    0
    1. Body odor can be a sign of zinc deficiency. Zinc tends to be more difficult to obtain in vegan diets and is lost in sweat so if you exercise a lot you may be losing more than you are consuming. It is one of the few supplements take.




      2



      0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This