Body Odor & Diet

Body Odor & Diet
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A study of the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness.

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And finally, getting to the gold: the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness. Not just body odor, but body odor attractiveness. Seventeen male odor donors were on a meat or non-meat diet for two weeks, wearing axillary pads to collect body odor. They taped pads into their armpits all day, all night. And then the researchers made them wear an extra layer of clothes to get them even riper. Then after two weeks, they took 30 young women and had them sniff the pads all fresh and drippy. Fresh odor samples were assessed for their pleasantness, attractiveness, masculinity, and intensity by 30 women. Then they repeated the study. Same guys, but just switched their diets around; same poor women. And just to digress here before I unmask the results, to keep up the suspense, the guys were paid cash—2,000 Czechoslovakian koruna for the inconvenience of having to eat a non-meat diet for two weeks. But the women who had to sniff all those pit pads—they were not paid for their participation. All they got was a chocolate bar.

Anyways, back to the results. Who had the most pleasant, the most attractive body odor? The meat-eaters or the non-meat-eaters? The results showed that the odor of donors when on the non-meat diet was judged as significantly more attractive, more pleasant, and less intense. This suggests that meat consumption has a negative impact on perceived body odor hedonicity—pleasure. Vegetarians smell significantly more pleasurable. I’m saying masculinity, by the way, but less smelly, more pleasant, and significantly judged as more attractive.

The one-liner takeaway from this study could be that meat is the pits. This may actually help explain the findings of University of Canterbury researchers this year. This study became an international media sensation: “Vegans say sex with meat-eaters stinks.” My favorite take was probably this tagline in a Canadian paper: “You eat meat? No sex for you.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

And finally, getting to the gold: the effect of meat consumption on body odor attractiveness. Not just body odor, but body odor attractiveness. Seventeen male odor donors were on a meat or non-meat diet for two weeks, wearing axillary pads to collect body odor. They taped pads into their armpits all day, all night. And then the researchers made them wear an extra layer of clothes to get them even riper. Then after two weeks, they took 30 young women and had them sniff the pads all fresh and drippy. Fresh odor samples were assessed for their pleasantness, attractiveness, masculinity, and intensity by 30 women. Then they repeated the study. Same guys, but just switched their diets around; same poor women. And just to digress here before I unmask the results, to keep up the suspense, the guys were paid cash—2,000 Czechoslovakian koruna for the inconvenience of having to eat a non-meat diet for two weeks. But the women who had to sniff all those pit pads—they were not paid for their participation. All they got was a chocolate bar.

Anyways, back to the results. Who had the most pleasant, the most attractive body odor? The meat-eaters or the non-meat-eaters? The results showed that the odor of donors when on the non-meat diet was judged as significantly more attractive, more pleasant, and less intense. This suggests that meat consumption has a negative impact on perceived body odor hedonicity—pleasure. Vegetarians smell significantly more pleasurable. I’m saying masculinity, by the way, but less smelly, more pleasant, and significantly judged as more attractive.

The one-liner takeaway from this study could be that meat is the pits. This may actually help explain the findings of University of Canterbury researchers this year. This study became an international media sensation: “Vegans say sex with meat-eaters stinks.” My favorite take was probably this tagline in a Canadian paper: “You eat meat? No sex for you.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Can our lunch contribute to our fragrance? For more on body odor and diet, see: Eggs and Choline: Something Fishy.

Then check out Asparagus Pee for another funky odor video.

For additional context, check out my associated blog post: Increasing Muscle Strength with Fenugreek.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

 

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