Carcinogens in Roasted Coffee?

Carcinogens in Roasted Coffee?
4.13 (82.5%) 16 votes

If there are carcinogens created when you roast chicken, what about roasted coffee beans?

Discuss
Republish

In the U.S., though, children have the highest levels of these carcinogens in their bodies. And these chemicals may play a role in our childhood asthma epidemic as well.

Two things seem to do it: meat intake, and the presence of smokers in the home. So, parents need to be educated to take certain precautions: no indoor smoking, and reducing their children’s intake of grilled and smoked meat, so as to decrease their exposure to these carcinogens.

Now, warnings about meat in general are kind of vague, though. Where are these carcinogens found most? Flame-broiled burger, or fried? Pan-fried chicken? Lamb chop, pork chop, or grilled salmon?

Salmon is bad, but for the first time, it seems, chicken beats out fish for carcinogenic contamination.

Chickens aren’t the only things roasted, though. What about coffee beans? Measured for the first time this year, but, they don’t have any muscles, so they only contributed “very insignificant quantities.”

And an earlier study found zero mutagenicity from frying veggie burgers; again, they’re not “muscle meat.” The carcinogen is created from the muscle itself—in fact, it’s been detected in roasted human muscle too, though I don’t know why they even did that study.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to lgkiii via Flickr.

In the U.S., though, children have the highest levels of these carcinogens in their bodies. And these chemicals may play a role in our childhood asthma epidemic as well.

Two things seem to do it: meat intake, and the presence of smokers in the home. So, parents need to be educated to take certain precautions: no indoor smoking, and reducing their children’s intake of grilled and smoked meat, so as to decrease their exposure to these carcinogens.

Now, warnings about meat in general are kind of vague, though. Where are these carcinogens found most? Flame-broiled burger, or fried? Pan-fried chicken? Lamb chop, pork chop, or grilled salmon?

Salmon is bad, but for the first time, it seems, chicken beats out fish for carcinogenic contamination.

Chickens aren’t the only things roasted, though. What about coffee beans? Measured for the first time this year, but, they don’t have any muscles, so they only contributed “very insignificant quantities.”

And an earlier study found zero mutagenicity from frying veggie burgers; again, they’re not “muscle meat.” The carcinogen is created from the muscle itself—in fact, it’s been detected in roasted human muscle too, though I don’t know why they even did that study.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to lgkiii via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

For more on carcinogens in meat:
Estrogenic Cooked Meat Carcinogens
Carcinogens in the Smell of Frying Bacon
Meat Fumes: Dietary Secondhand Smoke
Heterocyclic Amines in Eggs, Cheese, and Creatine?
When Nitrites Go Bad

And check out my other videos on cooking methods

For more context, check out my associated blog post: Avoid Cooked Meat Carcinogens.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This