Carrots vs. Baby Carrots

Carrots vs. Baby Carrots
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Choosing the most antioxidant-packed carrots, onions, and lettuce.

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Carrots? Or the same weight in baby carrots? Does the “smaller is better” rule for grapes work for carrots as well? Who thinks regular carrots are healthier? Baby carrots? Nope, smaller is better, but regular carrots are actually the ones that are smaller. So called “baby” carrots are just mechanically whittled from these monster carrots.

Let’s try a three-way. Which is healthier—iceberg lettuce, Boston lettuce (also known as green leaf lettuce), or red leaf lettuce? How many dare say iceberg? Green leaf? Red leaf? It’s the red leaf lettuce. 

Red, white, or yellow onions? Who thinks red onions are healthier? White? What about yellow?  Look at this! We should never buy white onions ever again. If you have a choice, always buy red—off the charts in terms of phytonutrient flavonol content.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Carrots? Or the same weight in baby carrots? Does the “smaller is better” rule for grapes work for carrots as well? Who thinks regular carrots are healthier? Baby carrots? Nope, smaller is better, but regular carrots are actually the ones that are smaller. So called “baby” carrots are just mechanically whittled from these monster carrots.

Let’s try a three-way. Which is healthier—iceberg lettuce, Boston lettuce (also known as green leaf lettuce), or red leaf lettuce? How many dare say iceberg? Green leaf? Red leaf? It’s the red leaf lettuce. 

Red, white, or yellow onions? Who thinks red onions are healthier? White? What about yellow?  Look at this! We should never buy white onions ever again. If you have a choice, always buy red—off the charts in terms of phytonutrient flavonol content.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

11 responses to “Carrots vs. Baby Carrots

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  1. Today I learned that RED leaf lettuce has the most antioxidants, IdaRED apples have the most amongst apples, and RED onions are the best amongst onions.  Is there a connection?  Are red bell peppers better than green/orange/yellow? cayenne?




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  2. We now know red onions have more antioxidants than yellow or white onions. Yet some red onions are mild and have fewer antioxidants compared to the “hot” red onions. The mild onions can be recognized by their wide and flat shape. The red onions highest in antioxidants are those which are round or oblong. These so-called hot varieties are the ones that bring tears to your eyes. You can tell you’ve made a nutritionally sound decision when you are struggling to see through a veil of tears.

    Farewell, Squash Your Tears Soup

    – 6 cups water/homemade vegetable broth
    – 1 large butternut squash, cubed
    – 1 cup uncooked lentils
    – 3 cloves garlic, minced
    – 1 yellow onion, chopped
    – 1 red onion, chopped
    – 2-3 tbsp fresh basil, chopped
    – ¼ tsp white pepper
    – Sea salt

    Mince garlic and set aside. Place all ingredients except salt, garlic, and basil in large soup pot. Bring to a boil. Turn off heat and leave covered on hot burner until lentils and squash tender, about 1 hour. Stir in garlic and basil and let sit for another 15 minutes. Season to taste with sea salt and black pepper.

    For more simple tips to maximize nutrients check out: Eating on the Wild Side http://www.amazon.com/Eating-Wild-Side-Missing-Optimum/dp/0316227943/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383059518&sr=8-1&keywords=eating+on+the+wild+side




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  3. It’s so arrogant to say, “Never buy white onions again.” How can he know there isn’t some valuable compound in white onions that we haven’t discovered yet? I thought he was above such a short-sighted reductionist viewpoint.




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