Coffee vs. Tea

Coffee vs. Tea
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White tea may be the healthiest beverage to drink.

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Which is healthier, though? Black coffee, or black tea?

Do you think the latest research has found that coffee’s healthier?  Tea? Tea is much healthier.

But are some teas better for you than others? Black versus green? Who says black tea is healthier? Green tea?

Green tea is better than black. And the best form of green tea may be what’s called white tea. So, white tea may be the best of the best.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Which is healthier, though? Black coffee, or black tea?

Do you think the latest research has found that coffee’s healthier?  Tea? Tea is much healthier.

But are some teas better for you than others? Black versus green? Who says black tea is healthier? Green tea?

Green tea is better than black. And the best form of green tea may be what’s called white tea. So, white tea may be the best of the best.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

More on tea’s healthful properties:
Antimutagenic Activity of Green Versus White Tea
Better Than Green Tea?
Is Caffeinated Tea Dehydrating?
Childhood Tea Drinking May Increase Fluorosis Risk

Also check out my other videos on beverages

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

8 responses to “Coffee vs. Tea

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  1. Hi Dr. Greger,
       Have there been any studies showing the health consequences of drinking decaf tea vs regular tea?  Thanks for your time and keep up the enlightening work!

  2. What about roasted grain beverages (like Teechino, Inka, and Genmaicha)? Do these coffee alternatives offer any health benefits or risks?

    Inka lists two ingredients: roasted barley and rye. Teechino French Roast consists of: organic carob, organic barley, organic chicory, organic ramon nuts, and natural coffee flavor (whatever that is). Genmaicha is green tea with roasted brown rice.

    Do you think acrylamide found in dark-colored baked, roasted and fried high-carbohydrate foods (like coffee, bbq meats, roasted nuts, and these roasted grain beverages) is something to be concerned about?

  3. I heard recently on one of your posts that high acid foods such as meat do not cause bones to erode. I think the word used was dissolve. I’ve been reading for a few years now that meat and dairy products deplete the bones of calcium so as to neutralize the acid content of these food. So could you give a clarification of the effect that animal products have on our bones

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