Healthiest Airplane Beverage

Healthiest Airplane Beverage
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Which should you choose the next time you fly?

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Next scenario: you’re on a plane, and the flight attendant asks what you want to drink, and you think to yourself, which is healthiest? You’re offered a variety of soft drinks, water, cranberry juice cocktail, hot tea, orange juice from concentrate, tomato juice from concentrate, hot coffee, and apple juice from concentrate. Which is the healthiest? Is it the ginger ale, because ginger is so amazing? Is it water—doesn’t everyone say water is the best thing to drink? The berry juice? The vegetable juice? Any of these others? Another tough one. Ready to vote?

Who thinks the healthiest thing up there is the ginger ale? The water? The cranberry juice? The tea? Orange juice? Tomato juice? Coffee? And who thinks the healthiest drink during your flight is apple juice? The answer is, the tea.

Even without the sugar and the soda in cranberry juice; even without all the sodium in the tomato juice, tea has all the water of water, but also has, as a bonus, more antioxidants than anything else on that drink menu. And make sure to ask for a lemon wedge. Of course, you’re lucky if you even get drinks on planes these days.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Next scenario: you’re on a plane, and the flight attendant asks what you want to drink, and you think to yourself, which is healthiest? You’re offered a variety of soft drinks, water, cranberry juice cocktail, hot tea, orange juice from concentrate, tomato juice from concentrate, hot coffee, and apple juice from concentrate. Which is the healthiest? Is it the ginger ale, because ginger is so amazing? Is it water—doesn’t everyone say water is the best thing to drink? The berry juice? The vegetable juice? Any of these others? Another tough one. Ready to vote?

Who thinks the healthiest thing up there is the ginger ale? The water? The cranberry juice? The tea? Orange juice? Tomato juice? Coffee? And who thinks the healthiest drink during your flight is apple juice? The answer is, the tea.

Even without the sugar and the soda in cranberry juice; even without all the sodium in the tomato juice, tea has all the water of water, but also has, as a bonus, more antioxidants than anything else on that drink menu. And make sure to ask for a lemon wedge. Of course, you’re lucky if you even get drinks on planes these days.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

7 responses to “Healthiest Airplane Beverage

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    1. Does food that is brought onto airplanes absorb radiation or harmful properties as result of passing through x-ray scanners and security scanners at airports? How about possible damage to vitamin supplements? Beverages? How about food at the high elevations that airplanes reach, as high altitudes of planes have been known to cause radiation issues in human tissue, no? Would not the same issue possibly apply to food brought on board? Vitamins?

  1. Lemon wedges have the tendency to have a significant amount of bacteria on them, especially those that you find in restaurants etc.   I always refuse a lemon wedge when offered unless it is prepared at home.

  2. Soooo… When they tested white tea and found it was healthier with a lemon wedge, did they account for stomach acid properly?

  3. Taken from https://www.inc.com/peter-economy/the-surprising-thing-flight-attendants-say-you-should-never-do-on-an-airplane-though-youve-probably-done-it-many-times-before.html

    But, according to flight attendants there’s one thing you might want to think twice about consuming on your next flight. That one thing? A hot cup of coffee or any other drink that uses water from the airplane’s onboard water system.

    A flight attendant for a major airline, who was quoted anonymously to protect her job, explained in an interview for Vice:

    Don’t drink the coffee on airplanes. It’s the same potable water that goes through the bathroom system. We recently had a test for E. coli in our water and it didn’t pass, and then maintenance came on and hit a couple buttons and it passed. So, avoid any hot water or tea. Bottled and ice is fine, of course.

    Another flight attendant told Business Insider,

    Flight attendants will not drink hot water on the plane. They will not drink plain coffee, and they will not drink plain tea.

    You’d think that an airplane’s water storage and plumbing systems would be designed in a way that would prevent any possibility of contamination from occurring, and according to the airlines, that is the case. However, some flight attendants claim that these systems are not cleaned on a regular basis. According to a flight attendant interviewed by Travel + Leisure magazine, airplane water tanks “are probably only cleaned out every six months to a year.”

    Indeed, when the EPA tested water from a variety of commercial airlines in 2012, the agency found that 12 percent of aircraft in the U.S. had at least one positive for coliform bacteria, which are found in the waste of humans and animals and are an indicator of the presence of pathogens, such as E. coli, that can cause illness and even death.

    Surprisingly, this is about the same figure as eight years earlier, when the EPA tested the drinking water from 158 randomly selected domestic and international passenger airplanes and found that 12.6 percent did not meet EPA drinking water quality standards.

    An investigation by Dallas-based television news station NBC 5 found that some airlines do better than others. In 2012, 13 percent of American Airlines planes were found to have coliform bacteria in their onboard water supplies (with fewer than half of 1 percent testing positive for E. coli), while only 3 percent of Southwest Airlines planes tested positive for coliform (with no tests positive for E. coli).

    So, the next time you’re thinking of asking for a hot cup of coffee or tea on a commercial airline flight, think again.

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