Is Carob Good For You?

Is Carob Good For You?
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Preliminary research on this chocolate substitute.

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We know cocoa is good for us. What about carob? Harmful? Just harmless? Or, helpful?

Wonderful stuff. There’s not a big carob lobby, so there hasn’t been much research. But this year, we did learn that, in the very least, carob can protect human colon cells from DNA damage.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Arpingstone via Wikimedia Commons.

We know cocoa is good for us. What about carob? Harmful? Just harmless? Or, helpful?

Wonderful stuff. There’s not a big carob lobby, so there hasn’t been much research. But this year, we did learn that, in the very least, carob can protect human colon cells from DNA damage.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Arpingstone via Wikimedia Commons.

Doctor's Note

Check out this video for more on carob:
Juicing Removes More Than Just Fiber

And check out the prequel about chocolate and cocoa

For more context, see my associated blog post: Soy milk: shake it up!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

14 responses to “Is Carob Good For You?

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    1. It’s from a bean and is similar in taste (I’ve heard, I haven’t tried it yet) to cacao/cocoa. I have only seen it in powdered form. You could add it to smoothies or other recipes in the same way you might use cocoa/cacao powder. A lot of people use it in place of cacao/cocoa.

  1. It seems like carob chips are made with hydrolyzed safflower oil. Should this concern us? Maybe the amount is so small that it’s not an issue… No?

  2. Wow, good to know. I noticed upon reading the label on Sunfood’s carob powder that it’s really high in calcium. Seems like an easy and beneficial way to add extra calcium to the diet. I wonder what the overall antioxidants are and how they compare to cacao.

  3. Please ask Dr. Greger if roasted or toasted organic carob powder contains acrylamide, and if he has a preference between roasted and toasted carob, and if roasted or toasted carob powder is safe to eat.

    As I understand it, the roasting process creates acrylamide in cocoa beans and nuts, so I wonder if roasting or even toasting organic carob powder creates acrylamide in this powder or if acrylamide is naturally present in carob prior to roasting or toasting.

    Thank you!

  4. G.

    The reality is that both the roasting or toasting process will indeed cause commercial or organic cocoa beans and carob to chemically produce acrylamide. The key appears to be in the amount and with what other constituents are present regarding the end products toxicity.

    As your undoubtedly aware this is the reason that coffee has a Prop 65 warning. I would not be at all surprised if you see a host of other processed products (those above the 248 degrees Fahrenheit level) as part of the expanding Prop 65 carcinogen list. You will find some interesting comments at the ConsumerLab site: https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/what-is-acrylamide-is-it-true-that-coffee-and-cocoa-contain-this-toxin/acrylamide-coffee-cocoa/ and for an expanded take on the California EPA’s position see; https://oehha.ca.gov/proposition-65/general-info/acrylamide.

    Their take: “Plant-based foods that are rich in carbohydrates can form acrylamide when baked, fried or roasted – whether they are cooked at home, in restaurants or by commercial food processors and manufacturers. French fries, potato chips, other fried and baked snack foods, coffee, roasted grain-based coffee substitutes, roasted asparagus, canned sweet potatoes and pumpkin, canned black olives, roasted nuts, prune juice, breakfast cereals, crackers, cookies, breads, and toast all may contain varying amounts of acrylamide. Foods that have been boiled or steamed do not contain acrylamide.”

    To understand the chemistry behind the reaction and some of the impacts of pH/moisture and storage see: https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/acrylamide-in-food-products-a-review-2157-7110.1000344.php?aid=30227&view=mobile

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

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