Is Tulsi Tea Good For You?

Is Tulsi Tea Good For You?
5 (100%) 5 votes

Holy basil tea may live up to its name.

Discuss
Republish

If you prefer herbal teas, in my talks in recent years, we’ve learned that some herbal teas are good for us, and some herbal teas are bad for us. Let’s run through a few more that have been recently studied.

Tulsi tea, also known as holy basil. With such a pious name, it’s got to be good, right? Harmful, harmless, or helpful?

Wonderful stuff.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Miansari66 via Wikimedia Commons.

If you prefer herbal teas, in my talks in recent years, we’ve learned that some herbal teas are good for us, and some herbal teas are bad for us. Let’s run through a few more that have been recently studied.

Tulsi tea, also known as holy basil. With such a pious name, it’s got to be good, right? Harmful, harmless, or helpful?

Wonderful stuff.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Miansari66 via Wikimedia Commons.

Doctor's Note

For more videos on herbal tea, check out:
How Much Hibiscus Tea is Too Much?
Hibiscus Tea vs. Plant-Based Diets for Hypertension
Herbal Tea Update: Rooibos & Nettle

And check out my other “HHH” videos (Harmful, Harmless, or Helpful?) – listed below the post. 

For more context, see my associated blog post: Soy milk: shake it up!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

21 responses to “Is Tulsi Tea Good For You?

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

    1. I was hoping to hear how much to use. I bought some powdered Holy Basil, (Tulsi) and just add it to what ever I eat or drink. Didn’t think about making a tea of it. I got it because it talked about being good for adrenal fatigue. I do have a propensity to the overuse of edrenalin. Seems, as hard as I try, I still go to the ‘flight or fight’ reaction to most things. I’m working on it. Tulsi and Ashwaganda are two of my go to supplement powders right now to try to use some sort of natural intervention instead of taking a medical route for anxiety etc. Any other suggestions? Thanks for your great posts!

      1. Lynn, you probably won’t read this and I’m not sure you would even be interested anymore because it’s such an old post, but I would suggest incorporating green tea throughout the day so as to put your brain in an alpha wave state which you can see in Dr. Greger’s video “Dietary Brain Wave alteration” here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dietary-brain-wave-alteration/ You might also find using lavender essential oil for aromatherapy useful, there’s a video with that information here somewhere. I also take ashwagandha and drink tulsi tea.

        1. Oh, I also find half a serving of valerian root useful for anxiety when I’ve really needed the extra help in the past. But it MIGHT make you sleepy. Two capsules (which is the serving for the Solaray veg caps I take) puts me to sleep.

  1. Is Tulsi Three Tea good to take for fighting candida? Does it have any sugars including natural sugars such as fructose. Otherwise, are there any other teas or treatments that you’d recommend? Thanks

  2. oh man this brings back memories. all houses in india esp. the south have a tulsi plant in the backyard n its holy n we were only allowed to eat a leaf or two but i was addicted to it. it tastes unlike anything ive ever tried n as a kid i would wait for everyone to take their afternoon nap n go eat as many as i could ha!

    1. sv, LOL!! That is hilarious and adorable and from my experience, I don’t blame you! I LOVE tulsi tea. I get Organic India tulsi tea. It really does taste unlike anything I’ve had and has a sweetness along with a powerful flavor… somewhat similar to black to but definitely not like black tea. I love it with desserts, too! I have no idea how this compares to the taste of fresh tulsi leaves, but I wish I could try some!

  3. Hi Michael Greger, I bought some organic powdered tulsi leaves. On the back, they suggest consuming one teaspoon a day with a large glass of water. Is this amount too much? I feel a little worried consuming something so powerful. I would like to know what is the appropriate dose

  4. I have a question? What if you have already very low blood pressure? Can you still take Tulsi tea, since it is an adaptogen, I’m wondering if it will lower my already low blood pressure? I took Panax ginsing before and it lowered it so much that I didn’t want to move. Dangerously low.
    Thank You.

    1. Thanks for your great question. I would proceed with caution if you already run a low blood pressure, but with low blood pressure, how you feel is much more important than the numbers. If the numbers are low but you feel fine, you are getting adequate circulation. But if you begin to feel dizzy, especially when you first stand or sit up, that can be a sign of your blood pressure being too low. The best thing to bring it up is to increase your fluid intake.

  5. I blog often and I genuinely appreciate your information. Your
    article has really peaked my interest. I will take
    a note of your site and keep checking for new details about once a week.
    I subscribed to your Feed as well.

  6. Sipping on it right now, never saw this video before… Dr. Greger, don’t scare me like that!! Lol. Great to see the green light and hear it’s great stuff, but I would love more elaboration on this and other adaptogen herbs such as ashwagandha.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This