Mad Fish Disease

Mad Fish Disease
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Researchers raise concerns about the feeding of cow brains to farmed fish.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Antibiotics aren’t the only dangerous thing agribusiness feeds to farm animals. We used to feed cow brains to pigs and chickens until last year, when Obama’s FDA banned the feeding of cow brains to most other farm animals. Though it should have been a “no-brainer,” it took 12 years to take that step, and still doesn’t go as far as Europe, which bans the feeding of all cow parts to all farmed animals, including fish.

Last summer, a group of neurologists raised the concern that by feeding cow brains to farmed fish, the consumption of farmed fish may provide a means of transmission of infectious prions from mad cows to humans.

That was in June. It was all just theoretical, though, until July. Researchers in Greece fed infected mad cow brains to fish to see what would happen. And although the fish appeared fine, you could see the disease building up in their systems. The neurodegeneration and abnormal deposition in the brains of fish challenged with prion, especially BSE—mad cow disease—raises concerns about the potential risk to public health. The prospect of farmed fish being contaminated with infectious prions, or developing their own prion disease, is alarming.

This is just for farmed fish, though. Wild fish don’t tend to eat cows.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Antibiotics aren’t the only dangerous thing agribusiness feeds to farm animals. We used to feed cow brains to pigs and chickens until last year, when Obama’s FDA banned the feeding of cow brains to most other farm animals. Though it should have been a “no-brainer,” it took 12 years to take that step, and still doesn’t go as far as Europe, which bans the feeding of all cow parts to all farmed animals, including fish.

Last summer, a group of neurologists raised the concern that by feeding cow brains to farmed fish, the consumption of farmed fish may provide a means of transmission of infectious prions from mad cows to humans.

That was in June. It was all just theoretical, though, until July. Researchers in Greece fed infected mad cow brains to fish to see what would happen. And although the fish appeared fine, you could see the disease building up in their systems. The neurodegeneration and abnormal deposition in the brains of fish challenged with prion, especially BSE—mad cow disease—raises concerns about the potential risk to public health. The prospect of farmed fish being contaminated with infectious prions, or developing their own prion disease, is alarming.

This is just for farmed fish, though. Wild fish don’t tend to eat cows.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Check out these videos on fish as a potential dietary source of pollutants:
Food Sources of Flame-Retardant Chemicals
Food Sources of Perfluorochemicals
Fish & Diabetes
Diabetes & Dioxins
Pollutants in Salmon & Our Own Fat
Dioxins in U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish
Dietary Pollutants May Affect Testosterone Levels

And check out my other videos on fish

For more context, also see my blog post: When a Scraped Knee May Once Again Kill.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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