Meat & Multiple Myeloma

Meat & Multiple Myeloma
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Meat consumption may increase one’s risk of a variety of blood cancers.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The NIH-AARP study also looked at diet, lifestyle, and acute myeloid leukemia. Two things seemed to do it: smoking and total meat intake—which included all beef, chicken, fish, pork, bacon, etc.

Since they measured the effect of both smoking and meat intake, we have a rare opportunity to actually compare the two in terms of cancer risk. So, in terms of our risk of getting this rare—but deadly—blood cancer, this much meat—two boneless chicken breasts’ worth—may increase our leukemia risk as much smoking ten cigarettes.

So, what if we don’t eat any meat? The most comprehensive study of cancer rates in vegetarians was published last year. No surprise that vegetarians had significantly less cancer than meat-eaters.

Perhaps the most striking finding was how low the risk was for lymphoma and leukemia among vegetarians. Just a quarter of the risk of multiple myeloma in vegetarians compared to meat-eaters; an aggressive incurable cancer of the bone marrow. Potential mechanisms include the mutagenic compounds in meat, and the viruses.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The NIH-AARP study also looked at diet, lifestyle, and acute myeloid leukemia. Two things seemed to do it: smoking and total meat intake—which included all beef, chicken, fish, pork, bacon, etc.

Since they measured the effect of both smoking and meat intake, we have a rare opportunity to actually compare the two in terms of cancer risk. So, in terms of our risk of getting this rare—but deadly—blood cancer, this much meat—two boneless chicken breasts’ worth—may increase our leukemia risk as much smoking ten cigarettes.

So, what if we don’t eat any meat? The most comprehensive study of cancer rates in vegetarians was published last year. No surprise that vegetarians had significantly less cancer than meat-eaters.

Perhaps the most striking finding was how low the risk was for lymphoma and leukemia among vegetarians. Just a quarter of the risk of multiple myeloma in vegetarians compared to meat-eaters; an aggressive incurable cancer of the bone marrow. Potential mechanisms include the mutagenic compounds in meat, and the viruses.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Check out these other videos on blood cancers:
Hot Dogs & Leukemia
EPIC Findings on Lymphoma

And check out my other videos on meat

For more context, also see my associated blog posts: Poultry Paunch: Meat & Weight Gain; and Harvard’s Meat & Mortality Studies.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

9 responses to “Meat & Multiple Myeloma

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  1. my mother in law got diagnosed with multiple myeloma 2 years ago, she has been vegan for over 2 decades and  her cancer markers in her blood are still going up. she reads a lot of information about cancer everywhere but it is mostly information about the more common cancers like breastcancer. since myeloma is quite rare its hard to find specific information about it. 
    I was wondering where i could gather some more reliable information about this cancer and maybe its possible treatment




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  2. I have just recently found out that my mom is going in for chemo because the doctors think she has this kind of pretty much to them “rare” dis-ease. But I´m a planteater myself and found this highly valuable supporting my own values. Do you think that it is possible to save her without getting through chemo, and putting her on strict diet and lifestyle?




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  3. I am a CML patient for about 11 yrs and soon will undergo transplant. Can you suggest food that I should be eating more of. I have been a vegan for the last 1 year and always regret why I haven’t consider going vegan earlier. Your website have been very helpful for over the years. Thank you for all your videos and discussions.




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    1. Shaila, I’m not a doctor and don’t have specific recommendations for you. However, I thought I would note that a whole plant food based diet seems to be very good for making a healthy immune system. Surely that would be a good idea for someone facing a transplant.

      I just wanted to wish you good luck with your procedure. And to say that I am totally with you on your thought about, why didn’t I go vegan earlier!? I sure wish I had.

      Best of luck to you.




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  4. I have MGUS. I’ve gone on a plant based low fat high starch diet and feel great but its always like the sword of Damocles with the possibility of Multiple Myeloma hanging over me. I read some studies out of Australia that showed some promise of preventing or delaying Multiple Myeloma using Tumeric and black pepper combination and started taking that. Any other suggestions?




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    1. Here is a few things for you to try:
      http://www.cancerforums.net/forums/17-Multiple-Myeloma-Forum?s=a68d10a7a5543861a68f3bbe48646c5f
      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/cancercured/search/messages?query=Multiple+Myloma&submit=Search&charset=ISO-8859-1
      http://www.cancercenter.com/multiple-myeloma/survivors.cfm
      http://www.cancercenter.com/multiple-myeloma/nutritional-therapy.cfm
      The Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) is an inexpensive drug with no side effects that has worked for some people. http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lowdosenaltrexone/
      http://www.ldndatabase.com/
      http://forum.ldnresearchtrust.org/index.php?/forum/55-cancer-ldn-experiences/
      http://curetogether.com/blog/2010/09/13/new-study-low-dose-naltrexone/

      I have a few reports that I can email to you, if you five me your email address
      Important things that you need to do
      Change your diet !!!!!!!!!!!
      Take wheatgrass everyday & a green drink every day
      Know & believe this is a temporary problem and it will go away.




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