New Corpse Smell

New Corpse Smell
5 (100%) 6 votes

Compounds released from the putrefaction of flesh can cause a common form of seafood poisoning.

Discuss
Republish

Then there are all sorts of really rare fish toxins that can cause our muscles to break down. Guy ate some salmon, went to bed, and when he woke up, he could hardly stand or hold a cup of coffee. Not being able to walk is one thing, but no coffee? The key point? There are lots of toxins in fish, and they’re not affected by cooking.

Nobody in their right mind would eat poisonous puffer fish, but what if it’s mislabeled as monkfish—causing these two recent cases of tetrodotoxin poisoning in Chicago.

Then there’s scombroid poisoning. Woman eats some mackerel at a restaurant, and just collapses. When fish starts spoiling, toxins can be released—even when the fish still tastes and smells fine—and can cause what may actually be the most common cause of food poisoning from fish.

See, when flesh decomposes, it releases chemicals that can have a toxic effect—like putrescine, and cadaverine, which is the “new corpse smell” that they use to train cadaver-sniffing dogs.

But it’s not just fish. When all carcasses rot, you get these decaying flesh compounds, including spermine, actually, which is what gives semen its characteristic odor. But it really depends just what kind of bacteria are involved in the putrefaction process.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to naotakem via Flickr.

Then there are all sorts of really rare fish toxins that can cause our muscles to break down. Guy ate some salmon, went to bed, and when he woke up, he could hardly stand or hold a cup of coffee. Not being able to walk is one thing, but no coffee? The key point? There are lots of toxins in fish, and they’re not affected by cooking.

Nobody in their right mind would eat poisonous puffer fish, but what if it’s mislabeled as monkfish—causing these two recent cases of tetrodotoxin poisoning in Chicago.

Then there’s scombroid poisoning. Woman eats some mackerel at a restaurant, and just collapses. When fish starts spoiling, toxins can be released—even when the fish still tastes and smells fine—and can cause what may actually be the most common cause of food poisoning from fish.

See, when flesh decomposes, it releases chemicals that can have a toxic effect—like putrescine, and cadaverine, which is the “new corpse smell” that they use to train cadaver-sniffing dogs.

But it’s not just fish. When all carcasses rot, you get these decaying flesh compounds, including spermine, actually, which is what gives semen its characteristic odor. But it really depends just what kind of bacteria are involved in the putrefaction process.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to naotakem via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

For more on this topic, check out:
Ciguatera Poisoning & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

And check out my other videos on fish

For more context, see my associated blog post: Diet and Cellulite.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

2 responses to “New Corpse Smell

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Is there any benefit to consuming wild Alaskan Salmon or should I just remain a vegan and get my protein from Lentils, beans, and other plant sources?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This