Peanuts in Pregnancy

Peanuts in Pregnancy
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Should pregnant women avoid peanuts to decrease their child’s risk of peanut allergy?

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Are there any other circumstances when otherwise healthy foods might be harmful?

Fact or fiction: pregnant women should avoid peanuts to decrease their child’s risk of peanut allergy. Fact or fiction? Where did anyone even get such an idea in the first place?

From the American Academy of Pediatrics—but, they’re wrong. Says who?  Says the American Academy of Pediatrics—who just reversed their position last year.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to random_alias via Flickr.

Are there any other circumstances when otherwise healthy foods might be harmful?

Fact or fiction: pregnant women should avoid peanuts to decrease their child’s risk of peanut allergy. Fact or fiction? Where did anyone even get such an idea in the first place?

From the American Academy of Pediatrics—but, they’re wrong. Says who?  Says the American Academy of Pediatrics—who just reversed their position last year.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to random_alias via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

For more on peanuts:
Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention?
Which Nut Fights Cancer Better?
Fat Burning Via Arginine

And check out my other videos on peanuts

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

10 responses to “Peanuts in Pregnancy

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  1. Hello. I am writing this in hopes to clear my conscious. I have an 11 month old who I am still breast feeding a couple times a day. I was not concerned of allergies, because I eat pretty healthy. Before I go any further, I did look into this topic when I was pregnant, because I have eaten the natural peanut butter at least once a day for the past 5 years. Yes I know I am somewhat of a fiend, but I am at a healthy weight, eat a variety of other foods, and exercise moderate to intensely every day. My heart has been broken lately though after giving my son a lick of my PB2 spoon. He immediately wiped his mouth, coughed and within 5 minutes, developed hives around his mouth. My husband is a physician and wanted to see for himself weeks later, so he gave him a lick of regular peanut butter. He still coughed, then became disinterested in eating and developed a red spot on his cheek. This occurrence was no where nearly as dramatic as with the PB2. A couple weeks later, he decided to try for the last time again with the PB2. Once again our son reacted just like the first introduction. Needless to say, I am heartbroken knowing my son will not get to enjoy a Pb sandwich, thai food, or peanuts at a baseball game. What did I do wrong? I was in transition to vegan during pregnancy, maybe ate meat 2 times a week. I have never been a fan of milk. I read somewhere recently that the peanut allergy was linked to breast feeding mothers who consumed peanuts. I believe the study was from Australia. The baby apparently is introduced to a protein in the peanut transmitted through the breast milk. So in connection with this video, should peanuts be avoided during breastfeeding? Is there anything at all I can do to desensitize my son? If I stop eating peanut butter, will it change anything?

    1. Did you get him vaccinated. A lot of people link vaccines to food allergies. Google taking probiotics with food allergy foods; and Google bioresonance to possibly cure him. Good luck.

  2. My son has pretty severe peanut allergy. What is the difference between allergies to plant foods, like peanuts, and allergies to animal foods, like cow’s milk?

  3. Hi dr Greger! I am a vegan for now 2 months and I have multible food allergies; peanut, all nuts, all legumes, soy, sesame seed and I react with sunflower seed butter, but this one is not diagnost! You can guess that is realy tough for me to eat vegan! And i’m realy curious about the corelation with meat consomtion and food allergy! Pease show that the science community search about that!!

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