Preventing Arthritis

Preventing Arthritis
5 (100%) 1 vote

Even flexitarians might be at increased risk for developing arthritis.

Discuss
Republish

It may even help with arthritis: “Fish, seal, and flaxseed oils lessened joint pain.” So, it looks like we have another choice! we can kill and grind up her…[photo of a seal]; we can kill and grind up him…[photo of a fish] Or, we can kill and grind up this [illustration of a plant].

On the other hand, eating meat—even a tiny amount—may dramatically increase our risk of developing degenerative arthritis. Even eating meat less than once a week may trigger arthritis. My patients will say things to me like, they only smoke x number of cigarettes, and my response is always that any amount of smoking is too much.

Well, this kind of data suggests the same thing for meat. So, let’s compare burgers. Same serving size, but the downer burger has 25% more calories, 300% more fat, 500% more saturated fat, and infinitely more cholesterol—of course, in addition to its arthritis-inducing potential.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

It may even help with arthritis: “Fish, seal, and flaxseed oils lessened joint pain.” So, it looks like we have another choice! we can kill and grind up her…[photo of a seal]; we can kill and grind up him…[photo of a fish] Or, we can kill and grind up this [illustration of a plant].

On the other hand, eating meat—even a tiny amount—may dramatically increase our risk of developing degenerative arthritis. Even eating meat less than once a week may trigger arthritis. My patients will say things to me like, they only smoke x number of cigarettes, and my response is always that any amount of smoking is too much.

Well, this kind of data suggests the same thing for meat. So, let’s compare burgers. Same serving size, but the downer burger has 25% more calories, 300% more fat, 500% more saturated fat, and infinitely more cholesterol—of course, in addition to its arthritis-inducing potential.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

More on the health benefits of flax seeds:
Can Flax Seeds Help Prevent Breast Cancer?
Lifestyle Medicine Is the Standard of Care for Prediabetes
Prostate vs. Plants

And check out my other videos on arthritis

For further context, see my blog posts: Preventing and Treating Kidney Failure With DietPlant-Based Diets for Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Plant-Based Diets for Psoriasis.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

 

13 responses to “Preventing Arthritis

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. This video seems to be a little messed up. The audio doesn’t kick in at the very beginning, so I missed hearing the first part.
    PS I LOVE THIS WEBSITE!!! Great job. Thank you!




    0



    0
    1. I’m so glad you’ve found the site useful Leslie. The audio weirdness of which you speak is an artifact of the fact that all the older videos were originally part of my Latest in Nutrition DVDs (http://www.drgreger.org/DVDs), and so got chopped up into topical segments for the website and you experience these kinds of continuity issues. Unfortunately there’s no “previous” video button where you can go back and see the “prequel” to the current video so you don’t come in in the middle (yet! We’re working on NutritionFacts.org version 2.0 to incorporate all sorts of new features). For this video, you can see the one immediately preceding it here: http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/algae-based-dha-vs-flax-2/




      0



      0
    1. This is a common myth perpetuated by misinformation. Soy does not effect hormones, in fact, phytoestrogens are basically neutral to your estrogen receptors. Xenoestrogens on the other hand, which are animal based estrogens from dairy, really change your hormonal balance. Hence why acne is typically a result of dairy consumption.

      Dr. Greger clears up this issue in many of his videos.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/breast-cancer-survival-and-soy/
      http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/soy-breast-cancer-3/
      http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/soy-breast-cancer-survival/
      http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/dairy-sexual-precocity/




      0



      0
  2. Dr. Greger, I love this.  Love the videos and the content in them and your presentation and delivery.  I am 38 yrs old and have recently adopted a vegan diet about 3 months ago and now slowly attempting a vegan lifestyle as well ( leather, etc..)  Could you reccomend any books, videos, websites ( other than yours) or any tips that i should consider.  Thank you again for the great work you do!  Eranga




    0



    0
  3. I first want to say thank you VERY much for all of your effort and daily contributions towards informing people of the truth behind so many aspects of healthty nutrition! I would love your input on a question I have though. I’ve had 4 knee surgeries now – all due to playing american football. I’ve been told by several Dr.s that my knee is like a case study b/c there’s so many things wrong with it, and I’m “too young” for a knee replacement at this time. I have arthritis “in all 3 parts of the knee”. Well, thanks to your information and videos, I now eat far less meat and I eat ground flax seeds on a daily basis. However, given recent pains in my knees, I was also considering taking Fish Oil pills and Glucosameen sulfate pills. What are your thoughts on those? And are there specific brands that are proven to be more reliable by actually containing the ingredients they advertise on their bottle? Thanks and keep up the great work!




    0



    0
    1. “I now eat far less meat…”

      I point your attention back to this video’s comment: “On the other hand, eating meat, even a tiny amount, may dramatically increase our risk of developing degenerative arthritis. Even eating meat less than once a week may trigger arthritis.”
      I expect you saw it, but hope you are taking this to heart, particularly if your knees are so bad. [And I expect the same is true of all dairy products and arthritis, as they are animal protein, too.]
      It does take some doing to switch from the diet to which we’ve been accustomed for many years.




      0



      0
      1. yes, I recall that video, but unfortunately for me it’s still a work in progress:) I haven’t consumed eggs or milk in several months – only unsweetened soy now. Do you have any input on “effectiveness” Glocosameen sulfate? Thanks




        0



        0
        1. There have been clinical studies showing improvement in some patients with arthritis. I have seen more patients benefit from a WFPB diet. Initial responses are probably due to the clearing of Neu5gc from the body see… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-inflammatory-meat-molecule-neu5gc/. For some arthritis I have seen patients who after improving greatly from going on a WFPB diet still have some flares that they were able to ultimately relate to specific plant triggers. These triggers can vary from patient to patient.




          0



          0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This