Red Tea, Honeybush, & Chamomile

Red Tea, Honeybush, & Chamomile
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Studies on the growth of human cancer cells in a petri dish suggest herbal tea benefits.

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So, not all herbal tea is good for us. You’ve heard about white, green, and black tea. What about red tea? Who thinks it’s harmful? Harmless? Helpful? Drink up.

Honeybush—another African herbal tea. What do you think? Harmful? Harmless? Helpful? Wonderful stuff. 

Now, honeybush is not as good as red tea, which is not as good as green. And green tea has more than just antioxidants. It’s got theanine, which we just found out enhances gamma delta T lymphocyte function—which means green tea may not only help decrease our risk of getting cancer, but also perhaps the common cold, as well.

Even chamomile, which isn’t even a dark green leafy at all. This little flower was pitted in a battle royale against various human cancer cells. Here’s chamomile slowing down prostate cancer, cervical cancer, fibrosarcoma, colon cancer, and breast cancer cells. As you can see, the more chamomile they added, the more the human cancer growth rates dropped. 

So, don’t just stop and smell the flowers. Drink them, too.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

So, not all herbal tea is good for us. You’ve heard about white, green, and black tea. What about red tea? Who thinks it’s harmful? Harmless? Helpful? Drink up.

Honeybush—another African herbal tea. What do you think? Harmful? Harmless? Helpful? Wonderful stuff. 

Now, honeybush is not as good as red tea, which is not as good as green. And green tea has more than just antioxidants. It’s got theanine, which we just found out enhances gamma delta T lymphocyte function—which means green tea may not only help decrease our risk of getting cancer, but also perhaps the common cold, as well.

Even chamomile, which isn’t even a dark green leafy at all. This little flower was pitted in a battle royale against various human cancer cells. Here’s chamomile slowing down prostate cancer, cervical cancer, fibrosarcoma, colon cancer, and breast cancer cells. As you can see, the more chamomile they added, the more the human cancer growth rates dropped. 

So, don’t just stop and smell the flowers. Drink them, too.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

Doctor's Note

More on herbal tea:

And check out my other “HHH” videos (Harmful, Harmless, or Helpful?) – listed below the post.

Also see my associated blog posts: Breast Cancer and DietHibiscus tea: flower powerSoy milk: shake it up!Treating PMS with Saffron; and Hibiscus Tea: The Best Beverage?.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

13 responses to “Red Tea, Honeybush, & Chamomile

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    1. Hi Dr Greger

      Please can you help me by clearing up the facts on
      Green Rooibos. I’ve seen outrageous claims this can contain 100x more antioxidants than regular Rooibos. Does Green Rooibos contain the same benefits as regular green tea? I prefer the taste of Rooibos!




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  1. Hi Doctor Greger
    I am having trouble digesting my teas – really tends to irritate my bowels – is there something going on chemically? Is there something that I can eat with the tea to help with the digestion?
    thanks




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  2. Do you think there is a big difference in the quality of teas – so that if I am buying my tea from a dollar store as opposed to a Teapoia store found in our local Mall- would there be a big difference?
    thanks




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    1. question was posted 7 years ago, but I can’t refrain from responding! Tea quality definitely varies. The best thing you can do is contact the company and learn about them. Where the tea is grown, how it’s grown (organic vs. conventional), what type of tea bags, how well are their products tested, and things like that. But just because tea is sold in a special store dedicated to tea, does not mean it’s better. There’s some really expensive teas that do not meet my standards in the least whereas some very affordable teas that do.




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  3. Hi Dr. Greger, thank you for for all your work at keeping up to date with the latest facts about, started drinking chamomile tea during over night shift at work, it seems to keep me on my toes and it taste yummy. thanks again




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  4. Hi Dr. Greger, thank you for giving valuable information, just start drinking the chamomile tea during over night shift at work and find it keeps me on my toes and taste good too . Will continue to visit NutritionFacts.org




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  5. Hello, my question is regarding Chamomile tea,I am a chamomile fan , if you could say , that means i drink almost every day a cup in the morning (max300ml). I drank during pregnancy also without knowing it can be harmful. If the baby was born healthy, should i expect long term complications ? He is breastfed (10 months) I drank tea during this 10 months. Thank you!




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