Soy Milk Suppression?

Soy Milk Suppression?
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Does soy milk have the same tea phytonutrient-blocking effects as cow’s milk?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 2007, we learned that milk blocks the absorption of the phytonutrients in chocolate. In 2008, we learned that milk may completely block the beneficial effects of the phytonutrients in tea. Might as well just be drinking water. In 2009, soy milk was tested.

The reason cow’s milk blocks the benefits of tea, we think, is because of the milk protein, casein, binding up all the phytonutrients. Since soy milk doesn’t have casein, though, one would assume that adding soy milk to tea is fine; but, you never know until you run the experiment.

What do you think? Soy milk blocks the benefits of tea: fact or fiction? Let’s look at the data. This is measuring the beneficial effects on arterial cells in a Petri dish. Here’s the control, plain water. Then comes the plain black tea, no creamer, and you can see the spike in beneficial effects that appear to be completely blocked by milk. Then they tried three types of soy milk: sweetened, calcium-enriched, and unsweetened. All of which had the same effect as milk! Fact: vascular effects of tea are suppressed by soy milk.

Now this was in vitro, in a Petri dish. We don’t know if this translates into actual people, but until we do know more, I encourage folks to drink their tea straight. And, as I’ve noted in previous volumes, green tea is healthier than black.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Jennifer Donley via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 2007, we learned that milk blocks the absorption of the phytonutrients in chocolate. In 2008, we learned that milk may completely block the beneficial effects of the phytonutrients in tea. Might as well just be drinking water. In 2009, soy milk was tested.

The reason cow’s milk blocks the benefits of tea, we think, is because of the milk protein, casein, binding up all the phytonutrients. Since soy milk doesn’t have casein, though, one would assume that adding soy milk to tea is fine; but, you never know until you run the experiment.

What do you think? Soy milk blocks the benefits of tea: fact or fiction? Let’s look at the data. This is measuring the beneficial effects on arterial cells in a Petri dish. Here’s the control, plain water. Then comes the plain black tea, no creamer, and you can see the spike in beneficial effects that appear to be completely blocked by milk. Then they tried three types of soy milk: sweetened, calcium-enriched, and unsweetened. All of which had the same effect as milk! Fact: vascular effects of tea are suppressed by soy milk.

Now this was in vitro, in a Petri dish. We don’t know if this translates into actual people, but until we do know more, I encourage folks to drink their tea straight. And, as I’ve noted in previous volumes, green tea is healthier than black.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Jennifer Donley via flickr

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