Update on Gluten

Update on Gluten
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Pros and cons of a gluten-free diet.

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What about gluten? For the vast majority of people, wheat protein, just like quinoa protein, or any other grain, has been considered good for us; health-promoting. But only for about 99% of people.

The rare 1% or so have celiac disease, and they have to stick to a gluten-free diet. But what about people who don’t have celiac, but may be otherwise gluten-sensitive? Last year, the possibility was raised that some cases of irritable bowel syndrome, for example, may improve on a gluten-free diet. So, if you do suffer from symptoms like chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain, your doctor may want you to give a gluten-free diet a try.

But, if we don’t have those symptoms, gluten is good for us. In fact, there was a study last year suggesting a gluten-free diet was bad for our good bacteria, so we shouldn’t go gluten-free unless there’s a good medical reason.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Benediktv via Flickr

What about gluten? For the vast majority of people, wheat protein, just like quinoa protein, or any other grain, has been considered good for us; health-promoting. But only for about 99% of people.

The rare 1% or so have celiac disease, and they have to stick to a gluten-free diet. But what about people who don’t have celiac, but may be otherwise gluten-sensitive? Last year, the possibility was raised that some cases of irritable bowel syndrome, for example, may improve on a gluten-free diet. So, if you do suffer from symptoms like chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain, your doctor may want you to give a gluten-free diet a try.

But, if we don’t have those symptoms, gluten is good for us. In fact, there was a study last year suggesting a gluten-free diet was bad for our good bacteria, so we shouldn’t go gluten-free unless there’s a good medical reason.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Benediktv via Flickr

Doctor's Note

Check out my recent series on gluten:
Gluten-Free Diets: Separating the Wheat from the Chat
Is Gluten Sensitivity Real?
How to Diagnose Gluten Intolerance

And check out my other videos on gluten, and plant protein

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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