USDA Parasite Game

USDA Parasite Game
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What percentage of retail beef samples are infested with Sarcocystis parasites?

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Okay, that’s kind of gross, so let’s move on…to the USDA parasite game. Every year or so, the U.S. Department of Agriculture tests retail meat to see how infested the flesh of farmed animals are. It’s up to you to guess just how infested. Greater than 50%, or less than 50%?

First up, the detection of Sarcocystis parasites in retail U.S. beef. This is what they look like in the meat, and sliced through under a microscope. So, what do you think? Greater than 50% of U.S. retail meat samples infested with this parasite? Or less than 50%?

Well, they fed beef to dogs, and the bad news is that parasites were “excreted by nearly every dog fed beef samples originating in the United States, suggesting near-universal bovine infection.” So, they assumed the prevalence in the U.S. beef supply was around 95%—so, definitely greater than 50%. The good news is that the particular strain they found seems to infect only dogs.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Okay, that’s kind of gross, so let’s move on…to the USDA parasite game. Every year or so, the U.S. Department of Agriculture tests retail meat to see how infested the flesh of farmed animals are. It’s up to you to guess just how infested. Greater than 50%, or less than 50%?

First up, the detection of Sarcocystis parasites in retail U.S. beef. This is what they look like in the meat, and sliced through under a microscope. So, what do you think? Greater than 50% of U.S. retail meat samples infested with this parasite? Or less than 50%?

Well, they fed beef to dogs, and the bad news is that parasites were “excreted by nearly every dog fed beef samples originating in the United States, suggesting near-universal bovine infection.” So, they assumed the prevalence in the U.S. beef supply was around 95%—so, definitely greater than 50%. The good news is that the particular strain they found seems to infect only dogs.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Here are some more videos on parasites and meat:
Chronic Headaches and Pork Tapeworms
Not So Delusional Parasitosis
Tongue Worm in Human Eye

And check out my other videos on parasites

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

4 responses to “USDA Parasite Game

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  1. Any studies on papaya seeds to rid parasites? seems like most OTC
    para-exterminators are WFPB with one exception… Food Grade
    Diatomaceous Earth aka D.E. aka dirt, aka clay, aka silica….. ancient
    microscopic freshwater plants called diatoms????? plant based after
    all.




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  2. Hi Robertzmys! My name is Dr Renae Thomas and I am one of the medical moderators.

    Potentially yes, depending on the type, but most people don’t accurately use meat thermometers or prepare the meat correctly to kill parasites. For example, read the cooking requirements of pork here-
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/chronic-headaches-and-pork-tapeworms/
    Many people like their meat cooked rare, causing issues discussed here-
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/brain-parasites-in-meat/

    Some can survive cooking too, such as here-
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/allergenic-fish-worms/
    AND here-
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/sexually-transmitted-fish-toxin/




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