Heavy Metals in Protein Powder Supplements

Heavy Metals in Protein Powder Supplements
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A Consumer Reports investigation into the safety of protein supplements found that more than half exceed the California Prop 65 Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act action levels.

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The Consumers Union, publishers of Consumer Reports, recently celebrated its 75-year anniversary. They were among the first to point out the risks of smoking, the toxic effects of ephedra weight loss supplements.

Well, one of their latest investigations questions the safety of protein powders and drinks. They concluded that we “don’t need the extra protein or the heavy metals [their] tests found” They sent 15 protein supplements off to an outside lab to test for toxic compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, and found that “[T]he amount of lead in a single daily serving of eight [out of the 15] protein supplements [they] tested would require that the products carry a warning in California” under their Prop 65 law for toxin-containing substances.

But athletes can get the lead out by choosing whole food sources of nutrition.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Serena.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Sebastian Dooris / flickr

The Consumers Union, publishers of Consumer Reports, recently celebrated its 75-year anniversary. They were among the first to point out the risks of smoking, the toxic effects of ephedra weight loss supplements.

Well, one of their latest investigations questions the safety of protein powders and drinks. They concluded that we “don’t need the extra protein or the heavy metals [their] tests found” They sent 15 protein supplements off to an outside lab to test for toxic compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, and found that “[T]he amount of lead in a single daily serving of eight [out of the 15] protein supplements [they] tested would require that the products carry a warning in California” under their Prop 65 law for toxin-containing substances.

But athletes can get the lead out by choosing whole food sources of nutrition.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Serena.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Sebastian Dooris / flickr

Nota del Doctor

This is the second of my three-part video series on some of the latest regarding the safety of dietary supplements. For part one, see Dietary Supplement Snake Oil. In part three, I explore why Some Dietary Supplements May Be More Than a Waste of Money. Also, check out Plant Protein Preferable, which explains why beans and other legumes are the best source of protein. What about gas? See Beans and Gas: Clearing the Air. And see my other videos on leadmercury; and arsenic for other ways to avoid exposure. 

For further context, check out my associated blog posts: Lead Poisoning Risk From VenisonAvoiding Cooked Meat CarcinogensRaisins vs. Energy Gels for Athletic Performance; and Probiotics and Diarrhea.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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