Testing the Dietary Compensation Theory

Testing the Dietary Compensation Theory
5 (100%) 8 votes

An elegant study is presented, testing the appetite-suppressing effects of walnuts.

Comenta
Comparte

Maybe the reason why 90% of the relevant studies show no weight gain from nut consumption is that nuts are so satisfying, so satiating, so appetite-suppressing, that throughout the rest of the day, totally unconsciously, we just eat less.

So, if researchers add a handful of nuts to our daily diet, totaling 200 calories, and they were just so filling that it displaced 200 calories of something else we would have normally eaten, then that could explain how, you know, one can remain in energy balance—even though they just added a calorically dense food, like nuts, to one’s daily diet. And hey, if you felt so satisfied you unintentionally ended up eating 250 calories less each day, then that could explain why, in a few of the nut studies, people actually lost weight.

Recently, they tested walnuts. “It has been proposed, mainly on the basis of observational studies, that nuts may provide superior satiation, may lead to reduced calorie consumption,…but evidence from randomized, interventional studies is lacking.” Until now.

They double-blinded the study by disguising the walnuts in a smoothie. “The walnut-containing liquid meal contained…walnuts,…frozen mango,…frozen strawberries,…banana,…frozen berries, and…pineapple juice.” Sounds good. Whereas the placebo liquid meal contained oil, mango, strawberries, banana, berries, and juice, and “40 drops of walnut flavoring.” In fact, they made it so you literally couldn’t tell the difference, in blind taste tests. And, they were made with the exact same number of calories. So, if there was nothing special about nuts, then you should feel just as satiated either way.

But, no. After a few days on the placebo, the walnut-flavored smoothie people just felt something was missing. Everyone drank their smoothies at breakfast, and then, right before lunch, the folks that didn’t get the real nuts felt significantly less full, less satiated—even after the no-chewing and full-fat absorption.

So, you can see how if you had nuts for breakfast, you may very well unintentionally eat a smaller lunch than you otherwise would—and so, in this way, nuts could actually decrease daily caloric consumption.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Maybe the reason why 90% of the relevant studies show no weight gain from nut consumption is that nuts are so satisfying, so satiating, so appetite-suppressing, that throughout the rest of the day, totally unconsciously, we just eat less.

So, if researchers add a handful of nuts to our daily diet, totaling 200 calories, and they were just so filling that it displaced 200 calories of something else we would have normally eaten, then that could explain how, you know, one can remain in energy balance—even though they just added a calorically dense food, like nuts, to one’s daily diet. And hey, if you felt so satisfied you unintentionally ended up eating 250 calories less each day, then that could explain why, in a few of the nut studies, people actually lost weight.

Recently, they tested walnuts. “It has been proposed, mainly on the basis of observational studies, that nuts may provide superior satiation, may lead to reduced calorie consumption,…but evidence from randomized, interventional studies is lacking.” Until now.

They double-blinded the study by disguising the walnuts in a smoothie. “The walnut-containing liquid meal contained…walnuts,…frozen mango,…frozen strawberries,…banana,…frozen berries, and…pineapple juice.” Sounds good. Whereas the placebo liquid meal contained oil, mango, strawberries, banana, berries, and juice, and “40 drops of walnut flavoring.” In fact, they made it so you literally couldn’t tell the difference, in blind taste tests. And, they were made with the exact same number of calories. So, if there was nothing special about nuts, then you should feel just as satiated either way.

But, no. After a few days on the placebo, the walnut-flavored smoothie people just felt something was missing. Everyone drank their smoothies at breakfast, and then, right before lunch, the folks that didn’t get the real nuts felt significantly less full, less satiated—even after the no-chewing and full-fat absorption.

So, you can see how if you had nuts for breakfast, you may very well unintentionally eat a smaller lunch than you otherwise would—and so, in this way, nuts could actually decrease daily caloric consumption.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Nota del Doctor

This is the fourth of a seven-video series on a fascinating phenomenon—why don’t nuts make us fat? I reviewed the balance of evidence in Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidence, and introduced two theories in Solving the Mystery of the Missing Calories—both of which were not well supported by a study on peanut butter, which I detailed in Testing the Pistachio Principle. We finally seem to be getting somewhere, though we still haven’t accounted for all the missing calories. Next, we’ll check out the Testing the Fat-Burning Theory. For my crazy breakfast smoothie concoction, see A Better Breakfast.

For further context, check out my associated blog posts: Nuts Don’t Cause Expected Weight GainThe Best Nutrition Bar; and Diet vs. Exercise: What’s More Important?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This