Too Much Iodine Can Be as Bad as Too Little

Too Much Iodine Can Be as Bad as Too Little
4.31 (86.25%) 16 votes

Excessive intake of kelp (kombu) or thyroid-containing sausages can lead to iodine toxicity.

Comenta
Comparte

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In this study of Boston vegans, concerns were raised about their iodine status, but one vegan’s iodine level was so high, they were excluded from the study. How is that possible? They were consuming kelp. As I’ve written in my iodine recommendations for a decade now, unless your neighborhood nuclear plant just melted down, no kelp—it just has too much iodine. And if you find yourself in Namibia, you might want to stay away from paddle weed as well. Other than that, though, and staying away from hijiki, which just has too much arsenic, sea vegetables are an excellent source of iodine.

There have been a few recent case reports of iodine toxicity in breastfeeding women eating soup made from kelp, also known as kombu, which explains this: “Iodine toxicity from soy milk.” Why? because it was made with kombu. But if you just read kombu on a label, would you think anything of it? Well, we should. There was a worldwide recall, complete with headlines like: “Café raid seizes banned soy milk.” A black market trade was operating in the banned soy milk, even though they faced half million dollar fines. That particular brand has since been reformulated without kombu.

The other way you can get in trouble with your thyroid gland is if you eat too many of them: “Hyperthyroidism caused by excessive consumption of sausages. After tests of the sausage revealed levels one might find in a dose of a thyroid hormone drug, like Synthroid, they “concluded that this patient had an exogenous hyperthyroidism caused by excessive intake of thyroid-containing sausages.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image Credit: Joi Ito via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In this study of Boston vegans, concerns were raised about their iodine status, but one vegan’s iodine level was so high, they were excluded from the study. How is that possible? They were consuming kelp. As I’ve written in my iodine recommendations for a decade now, unless your neighborhood nuclear plant just melted down, no kelp—it just has too much iodine. And if you find yourself in Namibia, you might want to stay away from paddle weed as well. Other than that, though, and staying away from hijiki, which just has too much arsenic, sea vegetables are an excellent source of iodine.

There have been a few recent case reports of iodine toxicity in breastfeeding women eating soup made from kelp, also known as kombu, which explains this: “Iodine toxicity from soy milk.” Why? because it was made with kombu. But if you just read kombu on a label, would you think anything of it? Well, we should. There was a worldwide recall, complete with headlines like: “Café raid seizes banned soy milk.” A black market trade was operating in the banned soy milk, even though they faced half million dollar fines. That particular brand has since been reformulated without kombu.

The other way you can get in trouble with your thyroid gland is if you eat too many of them: “Hyperthyroidism caused by excessive consumption of sausages. After tests of the sausage revealed levels one might find in a dose of a thyroid hormone drug, like Synthroid, they “concluded that this patient had an exogenous hyperthyroidism caused by excessive intake of thyroid-containing sausages.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image Credit: Joi Ito via flickr. Image has been modified.

Nota del Doctor

For more videos on iodine, see:
Pregnant Vegans at Risk for Iodine Deficiency                                                                                     Can Gargling Prevent The Common Cold?
Which Seaweed is Most Protective Against Breast Cancer?

Also check out my associated blog posts: How much pus is there in milk?The Best DetoxOptimum Nutrition RecommendationsDo Eden Beans Have Too Much Iodine?; and The Best Way to Prevent the Common Cold?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This