Clonal Deletion Theory of Immunity

Clonal Deletion Theory of Immunity
5 (100%) 5 votes

Plant-based diets may be protective against multiple sclerosis because IGF-1 can prevent our immune system from eliminating autoimmune cells.

Comenta
Comparte

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

How is it our immune system is able to distinguish between self and non-self? How does our immune system know what to attack, and what not to attack? As I described, the clonal selection theory of immunity suggests that we start out able to fend off basically every cellular structure in the known universe, because we have a billion different types of antibody-producing B cells—each capable of recognizing a different molecular signature.

Why, then, do we tend not to attack ourselves? It’s because before we’re even born, we kill off each and every B cell that recognizes us. It’s called clonal deletion; the killing off of forbidden clones. That’s what our thymus gland is for. When we’re still a fetus, our body lines up all our immune cells (our B cells, our T cells), holds up a picture of our self, and asks them, one by one: “do you recognize this person?” And if any of our immune cells say yes, they’re shot in the head. Killed on the spot; death by apopotosis, and good riddance.

Turns out this process of clonal deletion—ridding our bodies of self-recognizing immune cells—happens throughout our lives, mostly in our bone marrow. If you remember, though, as I talked about before, IGF-1, the cancer-promoting growth hormone boosted by animal protein consumption, prevents apoptosis, prevents our body’s killing of cells it wants to get rid of. That may be why IGF-1 levels are linked to cancer.

So, it is “of great interest to determine whether…[IGF may be contributing] to the inappropriate survival of lymphocytes in autoimmune or inflammatory conditions.” Maybe that’s why people who eat plant-based diets appear protected from autoimmune diseases—explaining, for example, the “extraordinary rarity of most autoimmune diseases among [for example] sub-Saharan rural blacks following a traditional vegan lifestyle.” Before they changed their diet, evidently not a single case of multiple sclerosis had been diagnosed among a population of 15 million.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Shutterstock and Ilmari Karonen via Wikimedia

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

How is it our immune system is able to distinguish between self and non-self? How does our immune system know what to attack, and what not to attack? As I described, the clonal selection theory of immunity suggests that we start out able to fend off basically every cellular structure in the known universe, because we have a billion different types of antibody-producing B cells—each capable of recognizing a different molecular signature.

Why, then, do we tend not to attack ourselves? It’s because before we’re even born, we kill off each and every B cell that recognizes us. It’s called clonal deletion; the killing off of forbidden clones. That’s what our thymus gland is for. When we’re still a fetus, our body lines up all our immune cells (our B cells, our T cells), holds up a picture of our self, and asks them, one by one: “do you recognize this person?” And if any of our immune cells say yes, they’re shot in the head. Killed on the spot; death by apopotosis, and good riddance.

Turns out this process of clonal deletion—ridding our bodies of self-recognizing immune cells—happens throughout our lives, mostly in our bone marrow. If you remember, though, as I talked about before, IGF-1, the cancer-promoting growth hormone boosted by animal protein consumption, prevents apoptosis, prevents our body’s killing of cells it wants to get rid of. That may be why IGF-1 levels are linked to cancer.

So, it is “of great interest to determine whether…[IGF may be contributing] to the inappropriate survival of lymphocytes in autoimmune or inflammatory conditions.” Maybe that’s why people who eat plant-based diets appear protected from autoimmune diseases—explaining, for example, the “extraordinary rarity of most autoimmune diseases among [for example] sub-Saharan rural blacks following a traditional vegan lifestyle.” Before they changed their diet, evidently not a single case of multiple sclerosis had been diagnosed among a population of 15 million.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Shutterstock and Ilmari Karonen via Wikimedia

Nota del Doctor

This is the third in a video series on understanding the autoimmune theory of cancer, outlined in Cancer as an Autoimmune Disease, and continued in Clonal Selection Theory of Immunity. To learn how dietary manipulation of IGF-1 may affect cancer risk, see The Answer to the Pritikin Puzzle and How Plant-Based to Lower IGF-1? IGF-1 also appears to affect prostate gland growth. See Some Prostates Are Larger than OthersProstate vs. Plants; and Prostate vs. a Plant-Based Diet. Next, we’ll finally get to the star of this video series: The Inflammatory Meat Molecule Neu5Gc. Be sure not to miss it.

For more context, check out my associated blog post: Plant-Based Diets for Multiple Sclerosis.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This