Poultry & Penis Cancer

Poultry & Penis Cancer
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The largest study to date on poultry workers found a significantly increased risk of dying from penile cancer, thought to be due to exposure to oncogenic (cancer-causing) chicken viruses, which raise consumer concerns as well.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Last year, I presented the study on poultry slaughterhouse workers, where they were found to have excess cancers of the mouth, nasal cavities, throat, tonsils, inner ear cancer, sinus cancer, esophageal, rectal, liver, leukemia, etc.—thought to be because they were exposed to cancer-causing viruses present in poultry and poultry products, and worse, that it may be “transmitted to anyone in the general population…handling [or eating] inadequately cooked [chicken].”

It’s not clear how you’re supposed to not handle raw chicken—unless you can levitate it into the oven through telekinesis?

The study was replicated recently in the largest such investigation to date, more than 20,000 workers in poultry slaughtering and packing plants. They found the same thing, confirming the findings of three other studies to date: “that workers in poultry slaughtering and processing plants have increased risk of dying from certain cancers…New findings [though, in this study] were [increased risk of death from] cancers of the cervix and penis.”

Excess cancer of the penis in all males in the study exposed to poultry, with a standardized mortality ratio more than eight-fold higher. Not just penile cancer, but dying from it.

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Images thanks to Mitchmaitree via flickr; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; and the USDA Agricultural Research Service

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Last year, I presented the study on poultry slaughterhouse workers, where they were found to have excess cancers of the mouth, nasal cavities, throat, tonsils, inner ear cancer, sinus cancer, esophageal, rectal, liver, leukemia, etc.—thought to be because they were exposed to cancer-causing viruses present in poultry and poultry products, and worse, that it may be “transmitted to anyone in the general population…handling [or eating] inadequately cooked [chicken].”

It’s not clear how you’re supposed to not handle raw chicken—unless you can levitate it into the oven through telekinesis?

The study was replicated recently in the largest such investigation to date, more than 20,000 workers in poultry slaughtering and packing plants. They found the same thing, confirming the findings of three other studies to date: “that workers in poultry slaughtering and processing plants have increased risk of dying from certain cancers…New findings [though, in this study] were [increased risk of death from] cancers of the cervix and penis.”

Excess cancer of the penis in all males in the study exposed to poultry, with a standardized mortality ratio more than eight-fold higher. Not just penile cancer, but dying from it.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Mitchmaitree via flickr; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; and the USDA Agricultural Research Service

Nota del Doctor

The previous slaughterhouse worker study I refer to is here: Wart Cancer Viruses In Food. There was also a study suggesting a relationship between cervical cancer and the viruses in meat (Pets & Human Lymphoma), but this is the first time I’ve seen penile cancer studied in this context. If there are so many viruses in chickens, don’t they get into the eggs? That’s coming up next, in Carcinogenic Retrovirus Found in Eggs! See my previous two videos: Chicken Dioxins, Viruses, or Antibiotics? and EPIC Findings on Lymphoma for a discussion of meat lymphoma risk. 

For further context, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: Treating an Enlarged Prostate With Diet; and Strawberries Can Reverse Cancer Progression.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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