Dietary Guidelines: Progressing from Pyramid to Plate

Dietary Guidelines: Progressing from Pyramid to Plate
5 (100%) 2 votes

MyPlate represents a significant improvement over the USDA Food Guide Pyramid.

Comenta
Comparte

The pyramid has been replaced by the plate. Thursday, June 2, 2011, the First Lady unveiled the federal government’s new food icon, MyPlate, to serve as a reminder to help consumers make healthier food choices.

Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture: “For Americans to lead happy, productive lives, it helps to stay healthy, active, and fit. It’s really pretty simple. Choose a healthier plate, and balance it with exercise. It all comes down to the choices we make. That’s why I’m excited to introduce to you USDA’s new food icon, MyPlate—a simple reminder to make healthy food choices. MyPlate symbolizes mealtime and the food groups:  fruits, grains, vegetables, protein, and dairy. A healthy plate for every meal, and what we eat matters. Overweight and obesity rates are at dangerously high levels, and the Obama administration has worked to support Americans who want to improve their health and nutrition. MyPlate is a departure from the food pyramid you’re used to seeing. It’s an easy-to-understand visual that shows how to build a healthy meal based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for all of Americans. And if you want to learn more about a healthy diet, you can visit choosemyplate.gov to get messages, tools, and how-to materials about healthy eating. This website will equip consumers with information on staying healthy, and tips on balancing calories, foods to increase, and foods to reduce. I hope you’re as excited as I am about MyPlate, and the other resources to help Americans make healthy choices at choosemyplate.gov. Next time you sit down for a meal, before you eat, think about what’s on your plate. In the months and years ahead, we hope that MyPlate becomes your plate.”

And indeed, which do you think is more helpful in terms of figuring out what to eat when you sit down at a meal. This, or this?

Nutritionists have expressed concern that Americans might equate the protein group with meat (or think that dairy doesn’t include soy milk), but the USDA defines the protein group as including beans and peas, soy products, nuts and seeds, and specifically highlights beans and peas as unique foods, as they count towards both protein and the vegetable group. It’s like a two-for-one deal.

And I don’t know if you caught it, but if you rewind, our Secretary of Agriculture appears to be saying next time you sit down for a meal, before you eat, make sure you include in your diet a centerpiece of fruit—and, random bottles of pharmaceutical drugs.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Karen Green via Flickr

The pyramid has been replaced by the plate. Thursday, June 2, 2011, the First Lady unveiled the federal government’s new food icon, MyPlate, to serve as a reminder to help consumers make healthier food choices.

Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture: “For Americans to lead happy, productive lives, it helps to stay healthy, active, and fit. It’s really pretty simple. Choose a healthier plate, and balance it with exercise. It all comes down to the choices we make. That’s why I’m excited to introduce to you USDA’s new food icon, MyPlate—a simple reminder to make healthy food choices. MyPlate symbolizes mealtime and the food groups:  fruits, grains, vegetables, protein, and dairy. A healthy plate for every meal, and what we eat matters. Overweight and obesity rates are at dangerously high levels, and the Obama administration has worked to support Americans who want to improve their health and nutrition. MyPlate is a departure from the food pyramid you’re used to seeing. It’s an easy-to-understand visual that shows how to build a healthy meal based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for all of Americans. And if you want to learn more about a healthy diet, you can visit choosemyplate.gov to get messages, tools, and how-to materials about healthy eating. This website will equip consumers with information on staying healthy, and tips on balancing calories, foods to increase, and foods to reduce. I hope you’re as excited as I am about MyPlate, and the other resources to help Americans make healthy choices at choosemyplate.gov. Next time you sit down for a meal, before you eat, think about what’s on your plate. In the months and years ahead, we hope that MyPlate becomes your plate.”

And indeed, which do you think is more helpful in terms of figuring out what to eat when you sit down at a meal. This, or this?

Nutritionists have expressed concern that Americans might equate the protein group with meat (or think that dairy doesn’t include soy milk), but the USDA defines the protein group as including beans and peas, soy products, nuts and seeds, and specifically highlights beans and peas as unique foods, as they count towards both protein and the vegetable group. It’s like a two-for-one deal.

And I don’t know if you caught it, but if you rewind, our Secretary of Agriculture appears to be saying next time you sit down for a meal, before you eat, make sure you include in your diet a centerpiece of fruit—and, random bottles of pharmaceutical drugs.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Karen Green via Flickr

Nota del Doctor

Be sure to check out all my other videos on dietary guidelines and industry influence.

For more context, be sure to check out my associated blog post: Dietary Guideline Graphics: From the Food Pyramid to My Plate, Harvard’s Healthy Eating Plate, and PCRM’s Power Plate.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This