Bulking Up on Antioxidants

Bulking Up on Antioxidants
4.57 (91.43%) 7 votes

Even when fiber and fruit and vegetable intake are kept constant, choosing foods richer in antioxidants may increase stool size, which is associated with lower cancer risk.

Comenta
Comparte

The relationship between stool size and decreased cancer risk at first seems pretty straightforward. Fiber is what causes bulky stools; the only place fiber is found is in whole foods. So, isn’t that just saying, more plant foods, less disease? That’s no revelation. But consider this: even plant-derived foods without fiber seem to increase fecal weight. How could that be?

That same group of intrepid Italian researchers that did the inflammation and arterial function studies turned their sights to the “Ability of a high-total antioxidant capacity diet to increase stool weight and bowel antioxidant status in human subjects.” Just like in the previous studies they did, same diets in terms of amount of fiber and amount of fruits and vegetables, but the high-antioxidant group just substituted some of the higher-antioxidant foods, like swapping in berries for bananas. After two weeks on the low-antioxidant diet, their average stool weight dropped down to three ounces a day. That’s almost as bad as New Yorkers!

But after switching to the high antioxidant diet (remember: same amount of fiber), there was more than a doubling of stool size. They suspect it has something to do with healthier diets altering the gut flora, but now we know. In addition to all the other benefits, a diet selected to raise the intake of dietary antioxidants is able to increase stool bulk. And incidentally, the antioxidant content of feces, though I’m not sure why we care.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is transcript contributed by Bruce A. Hamilton.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Gerard Stolk / Flickr

The relationship between stool size and decreased cancer risk at first seems pretty straightforward. Fiber is what causes bulky stools; the only place fiber is found is in whole foods. So, isn’t that just saying, more plant foods, less disease? That’s no revelation. But consider this: even plant-derived foods without fiber seem to increase fecal weight. How could that be?

That same group of intrepid Italian researchers that did the inflammation and arterial function studies turned their sights to the “Ability of a high-total antioxidant capacity diet to increase stool weight and bowel antioxidant status in human subjects.” Just like in the previous studies they did, same diets in terms of amount of fiber and amount of fruits and vegetables, but the high-antioxidant group just substituted some of the higher-antioxidant foods, like swapping in berries for bananas. After two weeks on the low-antioxidant diet, their average stool weight dropped down to three ounces a day. That’s almost as bad as New Yorkers!

But after switching to the high antioxidant diet (remember: same amount of fiber), there was more than a doubling of stool size. They suspect it has something to do with healthier diets altering the gut flora, but now we know. In addition to all the other benefits, a diet selected to raise the intake of dietary antioxidants is able to increase stool bulk. And incidentally, the antioxidant content of feces, though I’m not sure why we care.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is transcript contributed by Bruce A. Hamilton.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Gerard Stolk / Flickr

Nota del Doctor

Be sure to check out all my other videos on antioxidants and don’t miss my other videos on bowel movements.

For more context, check out my associated blog posts: Stool Size and Breast Cancer RiskKiwi Fruit for Irritable Bowel SyndromeAntioxidants in a Pinch: Dried Herbs and SpicesBest Treatment for Constipation; and Raspberries Reverse Precancerous Lesions.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This