Relieving Yourself of Excess Estrogen

Relieving Yourself of Excess Estrogen
5 (100%) 3 votes

Women eating vegetarian may have lower breast cancer rates because they have larger bowel movements.

Comenta
Comparte

Earlier this year, a study was published comparing the hormonal levels of women with and without breast cancer. If estrogen makes most breast cancers grow, then one would expect that the level of estrogen would be higher in women who have breast cancer, compared to women who don’t, or at least who don’t yet.

And indeed, no surprise, that’s what they found—significantly more estradiol freely circulating through their bloodstream of those with breast cancer. But the study also looked at diets and hormonal levels. These were all omnivores; the women eating vegetarian did even better.

This may help explain why, in a study of the “Relative Risks for Breast Cancer by Levels of Animal Product Consumption,” there appears to be a trend between lower breast cancer risk the more vegetarian someone eats. And it was researchers at my medical alma mater, Tufts, that figured out why, in a landmark article published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

See, the way our bodies get rid of excess cholesterol is to dump it into the digestive tract, knowing full well that there’ll be lots of fiber in there to grab it, hold onto it, and flush it out of the body (though, hopefully, you chew a little better than that).

We did, after all, evolve quite a long time before Twinkies and Wonder Bread, and the ascension of royal establishments such as Burger King and Dairy Queen. So, our body just expects it; just assumes our intestines are going to be packed with fiber all day long—seven times more than we’re getting now. We did evolve eating some meat, but plants don’t tend to run as fast, and so the bulk of our diets was made up of a lot of bulk.

And that’s how your body gets rid of excess estrogen. Vegetarian women have increased fiber input, which leads to “vegetarian women [having] an increased fecal output, which leads to increased [fecal] excretion of estrogen and a decreased [blood] concentration of estrogen.”

And this just wasn’t in theory; they measured it. “Subjects were provided with plastic bags and insulated boxes filled with dry ice for three 24-hour fecal collections.” You’ve heard of popsicles, well, they had them make more like poopsicles.

And here you go. In any one 24-hour period, the vegetarians were fecally excreting more than twice as much estrogen as the omnivores. And, measuring the estrogen excretion versus the size of the fecal output, you can see: the bigger the better. See the heavyweight Vs versus the welterweight Os? No wonder vegetarian women in the United States have been found to have such lower rates of breast cancer.

It’s great that many women stopped hormone replacement therapy, stopped taking extra estrogens. Well, another way to rid yourself of excess estrogens is in the way nature intended.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Cindi Pierce, Renee Comet at the National Cancer Institute, and Gastrolab.

Earlier this year, a study was published comparing the hormonal levels of women with and without breast cancer. If estrogen makes most breast cancers grow, then one would expect that the level of estrogen would be higher in women who have breast cancer, compared to women who don’t, or at least who don’t yet.

And indeed, no surprise, that’s what they found—significantly more estradiol freely circulating through their bloodstream of those with breast cancer. But the study also looked at diets and hormonal levels. These were all omnivores; the women eating vegetarian did even better.

This may help explain why, in a study of the “Relative Risks for Breast Cancer by Levels of Animal Product Consumption,” there appears to be a trend between lower breast cancer risk the more vegetarian someone eats. And it was researchers at my medical alma mater, Tufts, that figured out why, in a landmark article published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

See, the way our bodies get rid of excess cholesterol is to dump it into the digestive tract, knowing full well that there’ll be lots of fiber in there to grab it, hold onto it, and flush it out of the body (though, hopefully, you chew a little better than that).

We did, after all, evolve quite a long time before Twinkies and Wonder Bread, and the ascension of royal establishments such as Burger King and Dairy Queen. So, our body just expects it; just assumes our intestines are going to be packed with fiber all day long—seven times more than we’re getting now. We did evolve eating some meat, but plants don’t tend to run as fast, and so the bulk of our diets was made up of a lot of bulk.

And that’s how your body gets rid of excess estrogen. Vegetarian women have increased fiber input, which leads to “vegetarian women [having] an increased fecal output, which leads to increased [fecal] excretion of estrogen and a decreased [blood] concentration of estrogen.”

And this just wasn’t in theory; they measured it. “Subjects were provided with plastic bags and insulated boxes filled with dry ice for three 24-hour fecal collections.” You’ve heard of popsicles, well, they had them make more like poopsicles.

And here you go. In any one 24-hour period, the vegetarians were fecally excreting more than twice as much estrogen as the omnivores. And, measuring the estrogen excretion versus the size of the fecal output, you can see: the bigger the better. See the heavyweight Vs versus the welterweight Os? No wonder vegetarian women in the United States have been found to have such lower rates of breast cancer.

It’s great that many women stopped hormone replacement therapy, stopped taking extra estrogens. Well, another way to rid yourself of excess estrogens is in the way nature intended.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Dianne Moore.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Cindi Pierce, Renee Comet at the National Cancer Institute, and Gastrolab.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This