Anti Up on the Veggies

Anti Up on the Veggies
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Greens rank highest in chemical antioxidant assays (such as ORAC, TEAC, TRAP, and FRAP). But which vegetables lead the pack when cellular antioxidant activity is measured?

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In choosing the healthiest foods, you may notice that everywhere you look, everyone seems to have a different top ten list of the most antioxidant-rich foods, with probably dozens of competing commercial products swearing theirs is the best of the best.

Some are probably just making stuff up, but genuine competing estimates arise from people citing old data, where they only test a few dozen foods, or a few hundred. But other disparities arise from different labs using different tests.

There are four in common usage: ORAC, TEAC, TRAP, and FRAP. USDA likes ORAC. These researchers used FRAP—in part because it’s one of the quickest methods, which is important if you’re doing 3,000 foods. Each has their pros and cons, but the problem with all of them is that they’re just measuring how good a particular food is at altering a chemical oxidation reaction in a test tube. It’s not done in a biological system.

But for the first time ever, scientists at Cornell took 27 vegetables, and measured their cellular antioxidant activity—their ability to quench free radicals within cells—by testing various vegetables on cultures of human liver cells. Sure, some phytonutrient may be a great antioxidant outside the cell, but what if it can’t get inside the cell? That’s where we need it!

If you do the standard ORAC test, this is what you find: spinach at the top, cucumber at the bottom. No surprise; dark green leafy leads the pack. But again, this is a chemical assay, measuring how these foods slow down some oxidation reaction in a test tube—a reaction that actually doesn’t even occur in nature. But hey, look, it’s the best we had, until now.

Any guesses as to who was able to unseat spinach? Here’s the cellular antioxidant activity. Cucumber is still at the bottom. But now, beating everyone else: beets! Number one, spinach, isn’t even in the top ten any more. All the cruciferous moved ahead: Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower. And hey, look, between the beets and the red bell pepper, it looks like the greens got beat out by the reds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is transcript contributed by Bruce A. Hamilton.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Daderot via Wikimedia Commons.

In choosing the healthiest foods, you may notice that everywhere you look, everyone seems to have a different top ten list of the most antioxidant-rich foods, with probably dozens of competing commercial products swearing theirs is the best of the best.

Some are probably just making stuff up, but genuine competing estimates arise from people citing old data, where they only test a few dozen foods, or a few hundred. But other disparities arise from different labs using different tests.

There are four in common usage: ORAC, TEAC, TRAP, and FRAP. USDA likes ORAC. These researchers used FRAP—in part because it’s one of the quickest methods, which is important if you’re doing 3,000 foods. Each has their pros and cons, but the problem with all of them is that they’re just measuring how good a particular food is at altering a chemical oxidation reaction in a test tube. It’s not done in a biological system.

But for the first time ever, scientists at Cornell took 27 vegetables, and measured their cellular antioxidant activity—their ability to quench free radicals within cells—by testing various vegetables on cultures of human liver cells. Sure, some phytonutrient may be a great antioxidant outside the cell, but what if it can’t get inside the cell? That’s where we need it!

If you do the standard ORAC test, this is what you find: spinach at the top, cucumber at the bottom. No surprise; dark green leafy leads the pack. But again, this is a chemical assay, measuring how these foods slow down some oxidation reaction in a test tube—a reaction that actually doesn’t even occur in nature. But hey, look, it’s the best we had, until now.

Any guesses as to who was able to unseat spinach? Here’s the cellular antioxidant activity. Cucumber is still at the bottom. But now, beating everyone else: beets! Number one, spinach, isn’t even in the top ten any more. All the cruciferous moved ahead: Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower. And hey, look, between the beets and the red bell pepper, it looks like the greens got beat out by the reds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is transcript contributed by Bruce A. Hamilton.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Daderot via Wikimedia Commons.

Nota del Doctor

Be sure to check out all my other videos on antioxidants, and don’t miss all my videos on ranking foods

Check out my associated blog post for more context:  Which Common Fruit Fights Cancer Better?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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