Black vs. English Walnuts

Black vs. English Walnuts
4.67 (93.33%) 3 votes

A dramatic difference exists between the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of black walnuts versus English walnuts.

Comenta
Comparte

The best way to keep and consume walnut oil is within the walnut itself. But, which is better for cardiovascular disease protection? Black walnuts, or English, (also known as common walnuts)?

Regular “English walnuts have been shown to decrease cardiovascular disease risk; however, black walnuts do not appear to have not been studied for their cardioprotective” benefits—until now. Maybe black are even better? Who do you think won the contest? Three choices: black best; English best; or the same.

I would have guessed black, just based on their rich flavor and color. But, I would have been wrong. English best, and I’ll show you why.

They both tended to lower cholesterol. But, when participants were given a meal containing “a sandwich with…salami and…cheese on…white bread smeared with” two spoonfuls of butter along with…yogurt”—and then a big handful of black or English walnuts, something very different happened.

When we whack our arteries with that kind of load of saturated animal fat, our blood vessels immediately, within hours, become inflamed and stiff. You eat English walnuts with the salami sandwich, though, and they’re so packed with anti-inflammatory goodness that you significantly lessen the impact.

“Black walnuts, however, did not improve endothelial function [the cells of the arterial lining], which can be explained by nutritional differences between the nuts. English walnuts [for example] have nearly 10 times as much antioxidant capacity as black.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to rawsomehealthy.com and xtinabot via flickr

The best way to keep and consume walnut oil is within the walnut itself. But, which is better for cardiovascular disease protection? Black walnuts, or English, (also known as common walnuts)?

Regular “English walnuts have been shown to decrease cardiovascular disease risk; however, black walnuts do not appear to have not been studied for their cardioprotective” benefits—until now. Maybe black are even better? Who do you think won the contest? Three choices: black best; English best; or the same.

I would have guessed black, just based on their rich flavor and color. But, I would have been wrong. English best, and I’ll show you why.

They both tended to lower cholesterol. But, when participants were given a meal containing “a sandwich with…salami and…cheese on…white bread smeared with” two spoonfuls of butter along with…yogurt”—and then a big handful of black or English walnuts, something very different happened.

When we whack our arteries with that kind of load of saturated animal fat, our blood vessels immediately, within hours, become inflamed and stiff. You eat English walnuts with the salami sandwich, though, and they’re so packed with anti-inflammatory goodness that you significantly lessen the impact.

“Black walnuts, however, did not improve endothelial function [the cells of the arterial lining], which can be explained by nutritional differences between the nuts. English walnuts [for example] have nearly 10 times as much antioxidant capacity as black.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Kerry Skinner.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to rawsomehealthy.com and xtinabot via flickr

Nota del Doctor

The anti-inflammatory power of nuts is really quite astonishing. Check out my video, Fighting Inflammation in a Nut Shell. Why are meat and dairy inflammatory? Check out my videos exploring the mystery: The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause InflammationThe Exogenous Endotoxin Theory; and Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia. I also give an abbreviated summary of it in my full-length live presentation, Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death

For more context, check out my associated blog post: The True Shelf Life of Cooking Oils.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This