Lung Cancer Metastases & Broccoli

Lung Cancer Metastases & Broccoli
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The anti-proliferative effects of cruciferous vegetable phytonutrients may decrease the metastatic potential of lung cancer, the number one cancer killer of women.

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What else can broccoli do? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, but lung is actually the number one cancer killer of women. About 85% of women with breast cancer are still alive five years later. But lung cancer is picked up so late that the number’s reversed; 85% of lung cancer victims are dead. And 90% of those deaths are from metastases, the lung cancer spreading to other parts in the body.

Well, broccoli seems to be able to do everything else. What about suppressing the metastatic potential of human lung cancer cells? Check!

What they did to assess cancer cell migration is lay down a layer of cancer in a petri dish, and then cut a swath down the middle. Within 24 hours, the cancer was creeping back, and by 30 hours, closed the gap completely. Until they started dripping some cruciferous compounds on them. As you can see, the cancer cells seemed almost paralyzed, kind of stuck in place. They don’t seem to want to go anywhere, anytime soon.

In their conclusion, they talk about the antiproliferative, antitumor effects of these broccoli family dietary compounds, ending with a Latin phrase rarely seen in scholarly literature, since it’s just so nondescript. But in this case they evidently felt it necessary. “These compounds have inhibitory effects on several types of cancer cell growth, such as leukemia, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, etc.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Fir0002 via Wikimedia commons, TobaccoDocuments.org, and Health Canada.

What else can broccoli do? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, but lung is actually the number one cancer killer of women. About 85% of women with breast cancer are still alive five years later. But lung cancer is picked up so late that the number’s reversed; 85% of lung cancer victims are dead. And 90% of those deaths are from metastases, the lung cancer spreading to other parts in the body.

Well, broccoli seems to be able to do everything else. What about suppressing the metastatic potential of human lung cancer cells? Check!

What they did to assess cancer cell migration is lay down a layer of cancer in a petri dish, and then cut a swath down the middle. Within 24 hours, the cancer was creeping back, and by 30 hours, closed the gap completely. Until they started dripping some cruciferous compounds on them. As you can see, the cancer cells seemed almost paralyzed, kind of stuck in place. They don’t seem to want to go anywhere, anytime soon.

In their conclusion, they talk about the antiproliferative, antitumor effects of these broccoli family dietary compounds, ending with a Latin phrase rarely seen in scholarly literature, since it’s just so nondescript. But in this case they evidently felt it necessary. “These compounds have inhibitory effects on several types of cancer cell growth, such as leukemia, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, etc.”

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Fir0002 via Wikimedia commons, TobaccoDocuments.org, and Health Canada.

Nota del Doctor

This video is the tenth in a series on the latest research on cruciferous vegetables. There were two on kale: Kale and the Immune System, and Smoking Versus Kale Juice. One on DNA protection: DNA Protection from Broccoli. Two on breast cancer: Broccoli Versus Breast Cancer Stem Cells, and Sulforaphane: From Broccoli to Breast. Two on upper safety limits: Liver Toxicity Due to Broccoli Juice? and How Much Broccoli Is Too Much? One on detoxing: The Best Detox, and Sometimes the Enzyme Myth Is True, on maximizing the production and absorption of sulforaphane, one of the key phytonutrients. Also, be sure to check out my other videos on greens.

Note that the paper I talk about in this video is open access—meaning you can download it for free by clicking on the link in the Sources Cited section, above.

For more context, please also check out my associated blog posts: Breast Cancer Stem Cells vs. BroccoliFighting Inflammation With Food SynergyEstrogenic Chemicals in Meat; and Foods That May Block Cancer Formation.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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