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The True Shelf Life of Cooking Oils

December 6, 2012 by Michael Greger M.D. in News with 2 Comments

The True Shelf Life of Cooking Oils

Cooking oil manufacturer “best-by” dates were recently put to the test by comparing the development of rancidity between almond oil, avocado oil, hazelnut oil, macadamia oil, grape seed oil, rice bran oil, toasted sesame oil, and walnut oil. Find out which oil starts going rancid within just a few weeks in my video The True Shelf-Life of Cooking Oils.

The best way to keep and consume walnut oil is, of course, within the walnut itself. In my video What Women Should Eat to Live Longer I noted that the Harvard Nurses Health Study found that eating just two handfuls of nuts per week may extend a woman’s lifespan as much as four hours of weekly jogging. No reason you can’t do both though! :)

Which kinds of walnuts are best? Black walnuts or English—also known as common—walnuts? I would have guessed black just based on their rich flavor and color, but I would have been wrong. In a study I profile in my 2-min. video Black Versus English Walnuts, when subjects were given a salami and cheese sandwich on white bread smeared with 2 spoonfuls of butter and then a big handful of either black or English walnuts, something very different happened.

When we whack our arteries with that kind of load of saturated animal fat, within hours our blood vessels become inflamed and stiff. Eating English—but not black—walnuts with the salami sandwich appeared to diminish the damage, which perhaps relates to the finding that English walnuts have nearly 10 times the antioxidant capacity of black walnuts.

The anti-inflammatory power of certain nuts is really quite astonishing. See my video Fighting Inflammation in a Nutshell as well as Dietary Treatment of Crohn’s Disease for other anti-inflammatory strategies.

I explore why animal foods may be so inflammatory in my three part video series:

  1. The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause Inflammation
  2. The Exogenous Endotoxin Theory
  3. Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia.

I also give an abbreviated summary of it in my full-length “live” presentation Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

-Michael Greger, M.D.

Image credit: @kevinv033 / Flickr

Dr. Michael Greger

About Michael Greger M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

View all videos by Michael Greger M.D.

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