Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

Image Credit: Sally Plank

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

In my video If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?, I explored how adding berries to our meals can actually blunt the detrimental effects of high glycemic foods, but how many berries? The purpose of one study out of Finland was to determine the minimum level of blueberry consumption at which a consumer may realistically expect to receive antioxidant benefits after eating blueberries with a sugary breakfast cereal. If we eat a bowl of corn flakes with no berries, within two hours, so many free radicals are created that it puts us into oxidative debt. The antioxidant power of our bloodstream drops below where we started from before breakfast, as the antioxidants in our bodies get used up dealing with such a crappy breakfast. As you can see in How Much Fruit is Too Much? video, a quarter cup of blueberries didn’t seem to help much, but a half cup of blueberries did.

What about fruit for diabetics? Most guidelines recommend eating a diet with a high intake of fiber-rich food, including fruit, because they’re so healthy—antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, improving artery function, and reducing cancer risk. However, some health professionals have concerns about the sugar content of fruit and therefore recommend restricting the fruit intake. So let’s put it to the test! In a study from Denmark, diabetics were randomized into two groups: one told to eat at least two pieces of fruit a day, and the other told at most, two fruits a day. The reduce fruit group indeed reduce their fruit consumption, but it had no effect on the control of their diabetes or weight, and so, the researchers concluded, the intake of fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes. An emerging literature has shown that low-dose fructose may actually benefit blood sugar control. Having a piece of fruit with each meal would be expected to lower, not raise the blood sugar response.

The threshold for toxicity of fructose may be around 50 grams. The problem is that’s the current average adult fructose consumption. So, the levels of half of all adults are likely above the threshold for fructose toxicity, and adolescents currently average 75. Is that limit for added sugars or for all fructose? If we don’t want more than 50 and there’s about ten in a piece of fruit, should we not eat more than five fruit a day? Quoting from the Harvard Health Letter, “the nutritional problems of fructose and sugar come when they are added to foods. Fruit, on the other hand, is beneficial in almost any amount.” What do they mean almost? Can we eat ten fruit a day? How about twenty fruit a day?

It’s actually been put to the test.

Seventeen people were made to eat 20 servings a day of fruit. Despite the extraordinarily high fructose content of this diet, presumably about 200 g/d—eight cans of soda worth, the investigators reported no adverse effects (and possible benefit actually) for body weight, blood pressure, and insulin and lipid levels after three to six months. More recently, Jenkins and colleagues put people on about a 20 servings of fruit a day diet for a few weeks and found no adverse effects on weight or blood pressure or triglycerides, and an astounding 38 point drop in LDL cholesterol.

There was one side effect, though. Given the 44 servings of vegetables they had on top of all that fruit, they recorded the largest bowel movements apparently ever documented in a dietary intervention.


Cutting down on sugary foods may be easier said than done (see Are Sugary Foods Addictive?) but it’s worth it. For more on the dangers of high levels of fructose in added sugars, see How Much Added Sugar Is Too Much?.

What’s that about being in oxidative debt? See my three part series on how to pull yourself out of the red:

Ironically, fat may be more of a problem when it comes to diabetes than sugar, see:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Discuss

Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.


53 responses to “Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

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  1. The Jenkins study that “proved” it’s safe to eat as much fruit as you want was only a small pilot study which didn’t reach significance. We can’t really depend on it. As a result of reading Dr. Greger’s article, “If Fructose is Bad, What about Fruit?” I felt that I had permission to eat unrestrained amounts of fruit, which I crave like candy, whereas before, I restricted my fruit intake in accordance with Dr. McDougall’s advice. I started eating loads of fresh, frozen and dried fruit- until I got the results of my physical and blood test. My triglyceride level was four times as high as it had been a year before, putting me at higher risk of heart disease. I had made no other changes to my diet or exercise routine, and searching the literature, I can find no other reason for the triglyceride increase in my case, except for the fruit. In particular, I suspect the dried fruit as a concentrated source of fructose. So, now I’m back to Dr McDougall’s advice to restrict fruit and I no longer eat dates and only occasionally have raisins in desserts that I bake once in a rare while.




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    1. It was likely more do to the DRIED fruit – the unlimited amounts of fruit refer to fresh – when you dry fruit, you eat more than you normally could due to the water content being removed. So it’s more concentrated sugars – I know this has been addressed before -but your self test isn’t very reliable either, because the point is fresh whole fruit can be unlimited. I’d be curious to know if you had the same results if you cut out the dried fruit and only ate the whole fruit in its natural form?




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    2. Thanks for sharing your experience.

      That is a good point. And while I do not put your results into question, I am trying to figure out what the association of fruit and triglyceride levels are. In this context, I found an inverse association in this 2015 study:

      “Our findings support a potential beneficial role of fruit consumption to reduce blood triglyceride levels in Asian populations.”

      Nevertheless, Dr McDougall does indeed point out to a 1994 study that shows a positive relation with fructose consumption and triglyceride but in this review I did not see a distinction between fructose from fruit and added fructose intake.

      Regardless, of whether there is a mechanism that could justify this change, it is more important that your levels become normal again.




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      1. Here’s the mechanism:

        Like excess glucose, excess fructose is stored by the liver as fat–more specifically, as triglycerides.

        Most fruits contain glucose as well as fructose. Grapes, bananas, sweet cherries, for example, are relatively high in both (relative to other fresh fruits, that is). As for dried fruits, Medjool dates take the cake. According to nutritiondata.com, twenty grapes (100 grams) contain 8 grams of fructose and have a GL of 6; four Medjool dates (100 grams) have a whopping 32 grams of fructose and a GL of 39. (Source: http://www.nutritiondata.com)

        If you’ve been eating too much glucose and/or fructose, your body will store them as triglycerides, producing–drumroll please–Ring Around the Belly! https://eatandbeatcancer.com/2017/01/01/ring-around-the-belly-5-keys-to-ringing-out-the-old/




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    1. Thanks for your question.

      In the USDA official Food Composition Database website, I found the nutritional content for “Wyman’s of Maine will blueberries in water”. As far as my knowledge goes, I think differences in nutritional value would be minimal in regards to the type of fruit in question. That being said, Dr Greger discusses something related to the topic here:

      Fresh fruit versus frozen–which is better?.

      According to this article, it seems like freezing blueberries improves antioxidant availability but fruit is great in general and one should not stop consuming them depending on how it comes, except when it’s canned, then there is something else to think about (see here).

      Hope thins answer helps.




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    2. According to Dr. Mary Ann Lila, director of the Plants for Human Health Institute at North Carolina State University, fresh berries shipped long distances can lose important phytonutrients if they’re not kept at cool temperatures. That means frozen berries are often a better choice. Choose IQF ones, she says (individually quick frozen–They’ll feel like M&Ms) and don’t thaw them at high temps (such as on high in a microwave.)

      More here from Dr. Lila




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    3. According to Dr. Mary Ann Lila, director of the Plants for Human Health Institute at North Carolina State University, fresh berries shipped long distances can lose important phytonutrients if they’re not kept cool. That means sometimes frozen berries are your best option, depending on how they’re frozen and thawed. Look for IGF berries (individually quick frozen; they’ll resemble M&Ms), she says, and avoid thawing on high heat.

      More berry tips from Dr. Lila here




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      1. I was looking for anecdotes from others who have a greater deal of vitality throughout their day as a result of eating more whole plant foods and what foods they found likely contributed to that. The science and studies are already there, but wanted to hear directly from others how they feel!




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        1. Matt, You have to pound down the carbs. I eat the daily Dozen as prescribed by Dr. Greger. But besides that, it’s important to put emphasis on starches: potatoes, beans, rice, corn, wheat, barley, winter squash, etc. An ultra low fat whole food plant based diet, with a foundation of starches. Try to get 4000-5000 calories a day if you’re active. Very important to read “The Starch Solution” by Dr. McDougall.




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        2. Hi Matt,

          It is not just the WFPB diet that gives you ‘boundless energy’. It also has to do with how much un-necessary body fat you are lugging around throughout the day. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn recommends that to be ‘heart healthy’, you need to be living at around 11-12% body fat. I personally shoot for 9-10%.

          When your system is clean and efficient, that is when you really start to feels the benefits of the WFPB diet. And don’t forget to add ‘daily vigorous exercise’. Dr. Greger recommends 90 minutes a day. The exercise is half the equation. Took me about a year of focused concerted effort to shed my 74 lbs. and get down to a healthy efficient metabolism.

          I’m 68 years old and feel so much better than I did in my 40’s.




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    1. Hi Matt. In my case, a typical day is:

      Breakfast-2/3 cup dry rolled oats, cooked with double the amount of water; added flax seed, turmeric, ginger, cinammon, plus 20 green grapes, 1 banana and 1 apple

      Lunch is typically a soup I make. Ingredients are kidney beans, pinto or black or navy beans, lentils, barley, potatoes, orange sweet potatoes (commonly called yams in North America), brocolli stalks, kale, carrots, peas, sometimes corn, turmeric, pepper, peppermint extract, cinammon, ginger, then at time of eating added oregano and parsley

      Late after a huge salad. Two large leaves of Romaine lettuce, 1 large leaf of bok choy, 1 leaf of kale, half a celery stalk, 1-2 carrots, a few broccoli crowns, a litle purple cabbage, 1/6 of a cantaloupe. I probably should be adding a bit of nuts to this.

      Dinner varies, usually a mixture of potatoes and sweet potatoes (yams) or brown rice with barley and lentils or whole wheat spaghetti, the latter with about 1/6 can of tomato soup (a weakness, I know) and pinto or black beans, sometimes both the potato/sweet potato and rice/barley/lentil mixtures with peas. Typically turmeric, pepper, oregano and parsley get added at dinner, sometimes other herbs or spices.

      It isn’t perfect, but it’s helped turn this formerly morbidly obese couch potato with angina who would waddle off to the fridge or mailbox to being on the go most of the time.




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      1. Wow, you are doing really good. That would be hard to improve upon. (I prefer collards to kale though!) Maybe a can of diced tomatoes or tomato sauce rather than soup. I make my own pasta sauce which consists of diced tomatoes, onions, herbs and spices, and a quart of some vegetable, typically summer squash or greens. What is your 5K time?




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    2. I’m healing myself from cancer from eating mostly raw organic fruit and vegetables. And WHEATGRASS!! And yes, I have more energy now than before I was diagnosed.




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    3. Niedoczynność nadnerczy, zmierz ciśnienie na lewym i prawym ramieniu rano i wieczór przez 7 dni, ciśnienie poniżej jak i powyżej przedziału 120-130 mmHg wskaże ci na właśnie nadnercza, możesz mieżyć też temperature pod pachami z lewej i prawej strony, zaraz po przebudzeniu bez wstawania z łóżka. Oglądnij to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfC0re9KJrE oraz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXcGB5wlWnI wszystko idzie naprostować. Ja zaczynam może za 2 tygodnie jeszcze badania krwi zrobię znajdż praktyka na https://www.grapegate.com/list-of-isod-practitioners/ ustawi ci zioła i do roboty.




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      1. Sorry in english:
        Adrenal insufficiency, measure left and right arm pressure in the morning and evening for 7 days, the pressure below and above the 120-130 mmHg range will show you at the adrenal gland, you can also have left and right armpit temperature right after waking up without getting up from bed. Watch this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfC0re9KJrE and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXcGB5wlWnI everything goes straight. I’m starting maybe in 2 weeks yet I will do a blood test to find a practice on https://www.grapegate.com/list-of-isod-practitioners/ will set you herbs and do the work.




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  2. I had the opportunity to test out effects of foods on my cholesterol levels a few years ago when I had blood tests every 90 days. Fruit had no effect on triglycerides but I dont eat dates, raisins etc. What does make my triglycerides jump immediately is baking, fat free, vegan, doesnt matter, any kind of baking, bread , flour product, pasta, heavy starch like potatoes etc. Even with eliminating these foods, I struggle to keep triglycerides below 0.8

    I did notice Dr Greger mentions fruit consumed with meals. I eat fruit as snacks.. is there harm in this ? Also, I recall looking at a beautiful cookbook once that used fructose as the sweetener in all the recipes that called for sugar. I hadnt seen that before.. is this a common practice?




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    1. HI Susan! Thanks for your question. I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions. Triglycerides are largely affected by alcohol and sugar in the diet. With sugar, it’s the ADDED sugars in the diet and refined (white) carbohydrates that are the culprit – no worries at all with fruit here. As for the cookbook, I would suggest using a natural source of sugar whether it’s cane sugar, palm sugar etc instead of the fructose as this would be considered an added sugar. Hope this answer helps!




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      1. Thank you JoanneB, I appreciate your feedback. My diet these days is pretty austere, but I do enjoy perusing recipes and cookbooks. The book I mentioned was written by a european chef, and when I went researching I found out that the European Food Safety Authority advises preference of fructose in baked goods etc as opposed to sucrose and glucose https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose because of its lower effect on post prandial blood sugar. Anyway, I have no use for fructose and ty for confirming my thoughts on using a natural source of sugar if sugar is necessary. thanks again.




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      2. I am having trouble with my triglycerides too. I do not eat any high gycemic foods like white bread or pasta and am very careful about added sugars in foods. And I only drink alcohol, wine, about once a month and then only 1 glass. I have been on the McDougall diet for about ten months and it has done wonders for my cholesterol. But my triglycerides are still running over 250. My fasting blood sugar is running a little high, typically between 97 and 110. I used to be classified as a type 2 diabetic but have been able to stay off medication for several years with diet. In addition, my HDL is low at around 33. I am concerned because my triglyceride to HDL ratio is very high (7.5 – should be closer to 2) which is a risk for heart disease. If I can get the triglycerides down into the normal range, I don’t think low HDL will be a concern considering my low LDL (74) and total cholesterol (149). Any ideas on things I could try to reduce triglycerides?




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        1. hi David Speed, I found this page while cruising around the net with your question in mind. It does list some factors to keep in mind if trying to lower triglycerides http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/triglycerides/ART-20048186?pg=2 A couple of items there dont apply in my case since I dont consume animal products or oil or alcohol. The key for me was keeping calories low overall, and avoiding flour products, grains, pasta and potatoes etc. One thought might be to ask your doctors support in experimenting a bit ie ask for lipid testing every three or four months until you find what works for you.




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  3. I had a very similar experience to the Guest that posted the first comment. I’ve been keeping track of my lipid levels regularly since 2003 and fairly often since 2013. In August of 2016 I was expecting my best lipid labs ever due to eating a whole food, plant based diet with no oils or added sugars (or nuts for that matter). My total cholesterol was the worst at 189 in 3 years. My TG were the highest ever at 147, my HDL the lowest ever at 39 and my CHOL/HDL ratio the worst ever at 4.8!!!! These numbers were worse than when I was eating fish and olive oil!

    I was shocked. While pondering what the heck had gone wrong, I looked through my food records and realized that prior to the lab draw in August I was eating more fruit (including 3 -4 dates per day for calories) and short grain brown rice. Those were my only additions to my diet. I realized that those foods had a higher glycemic index (GI) than what I had been eating previously. It irked me that it could be the cause of my problems, but at least I had found a possible answer.

    I cut out the dates, cut back on the fruit and switched out short grain brown rice for long grain brown rice and added in some olive oil. My labs improved in November! My TG dropped to 80, my HDL went to 48, my LDL dropped 12 points, my TC dropped 17 points and my ratio dropped to 3.6.

    Being the rebellious person that I am (not), I added back in one date a day. I try to limit my fruit to 2ish servings a day (not including the date). I continue to eat the long grain brown rice. Unfortunately, rice is the only grain my body will tolerate. Even some fruits don’t work for me. I tested one large organic strawberry last night and ended up with a wicked headache. Blueberries give me a similar reaction. :-(

    I will be very interested to see what my labs will be in the next couple of weeks when I have them drawn. I know that if I ate more fruit than I do now I’d be in a heap of trouble lipid wise! I’m just hoping what I’m eating now will be acceptable. And while I still consume olive and/or canola oil, my total fat intake is <10% of my total calories.

    So if you find your labs going askew and you are eating WFPB no oil, know that you aren't alone, and consider the GI of the foods you are eating!

    Thanking everyone, including Dr. Gregor for all you do!!




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    1. Thank you, Timaca for affirming my observations above. The fat in my diet is also slightly above 10% but instead of oils which I consider to be unnatural I eat walnuts and flax seeds and occasionally, chia seeds as the main source of fat in my diet. It’s a shame that you can’t tolerate grains other than rice. My favorite are rolled or steel-cut oats and barley, both high in beta glucans, low on the glycemic scale and heart healthy. I think blood testing is important to see what works for the individual. It seems that one person for example, can get away withe eating tons of fruit, while another cannot.




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      1. I wish I could eat nuts and seeds but I can’t seem to tolerate those either! :-( That is why I use a small amount of olive oil. I hope your labs continue to improve!!!!!! :-)




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  4. Thank you Timaca for sharing your experience because it really is helpful. And, Im glad in a way to hear I am not the only one out there that struggles with cholesterol issues. I dont have the chance to check as often anymore, but i do the wfpb no oil thing, and as far as fruit goes I tend to keep tropical fruit other than oranges and bananas in the rare treat category. Apples I eat daily, and some berries if I can too The apples I eat because of Dr Greger’s video about women lowering cholesterol with dried apple rings. Best of luck in your upcoming labwork, and thanks again.




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    1. I am glad what I wrote was helpful! It is nice to know that one isn’t alone in their struggles! I hope your lab work continues to get better and better too! :-)




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  5. I tried to read the study cited because I was curious about the kind if fruit used in the 20 fruit a day experiment but the link shows no abstract.
    Dr Greger could you tell us what type of fruit one can eat to have these results?
    Is tropical fruit allowed, for example?
    Thank you




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    1. Hi Martina, I agree it is very frustrating to not get all the details of a study. I looked at the abstract and tried to find a site where I could obtain the full text to find out more about the types of fruit they tested in their subjects but no luck! From what he wrote and what was published in the abstract you can probably eat as much fruit as you can tolerate or hold until your next bathroom visit. Let us know how you do. Wish I could be more help.




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  6. I’ve been on WFPB no oil diet for 9mths. My TC fof cholesterol is 100. HDL 40. LDL 49. TG 78. I eat a tropical fruit known as Durian ( high in carbs & mono fat) frequently. I have heart disease (CAD). Is it safe to still consume Durians with such cholesterol numbers or should i cut it out Completely? Im on 20mg Simvastatin.

    TQ




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    1. Eric, I love durian. I live in the LA metro area, I can pretty much get frozen durian year round. I feast upon durian from time to time. I love its creamy, custard like texture, but it is very rich so I have not made it not a regular part of my diet.
      It would have been useful if “bob” would have cited his source(s) for the blood sugar spike for durian. The USDA database does not give a break down of durian’s fat composition, but I did find the following: (http://www.yearofthedurian.com/2012/08/durian-and-cholesterol.html)

      “The fatty acid composition of durian is different for each variety, but there are enough similarities to draw a general picture. The USDA lacks detailed data on the breakdown of durian’s fat, but an independent study analyzing the fatty acid content of four Malaysian cultivars (D-24, D-2, D-8, D-66) found a fair amount of saturated fat, between 58 and 65 percent of total fat (Berry, 1981).”

      So at 147 Cals and 5.3 grams of fat per 100 gram serving of durian, that a maximum of 3.4 grams of SF per serving which nets out worst case to 21% of the calories coming from saturated fat which is admittedly high.
      For comparison, Haas Avocados are 167 Cals, 15.4 grams total fat, 2.1 grams saturate fat per 100 gram serving which comes to 11% of calories from SF so more total fat, but a lower SF as a total percentage of calories.

      My typical SF intake is less than 7 grams per day which comes out to 3% or less of my calories from SF’s. When it comes to these kinds of things, I listen to my body. I feel just fine after eating avocados, but I eat them with other foods. I usually eat durian as a stand alone meal, and I get a food coma afterwards. Durian would probably not do well if it were subjected to the “brachial artery tourniquet test,” and I wouldn’t be surprised if durian caused lipemia which is an abnormally high concentration of emulsified fat in the blood.

      I’d be more concerned with durian’s saturated fat spike not its sugar spike, and for these reasons, it would seem prudent to eat it infrequently or very sparingly.




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    2. Eric, I love durian. I live in the LA metro area, I can pretty much get frozen durian year round. I feast upon durian from time to time. I love its creamy, custard like texture, but it is very rich so I have not made it not a regular part of my diet.
      It would have been useful if “bob” would have cited his source(s) for the blood sugar spike for durian. The USDA database does not give a break down of durian’s fat composition, but I did find the following: (http://www.yearofthedurian.com/2012/08/durian-and-cholesterol.html)

      “The fatty acid composition of durian is different for each variety, but there are enough similarities to draw a general picture. The USDA lacks detailed data on the breakdown of durian’s fat, but an independent study analyzing the fatty acid content of four Malaysian cultivars (D-24, D-2, D-8, D-66) found a fair amount of saturated fat, between 58 and 65 percent of total fat (Berry, 1981).”

      So at 147 Cals and 5.3 grams of fat per 100 gram serving of durian, that a maximum of 3.4 grams of SF per serving which nets out worst case to 21% of the calories coming from saturated fat which is admittedly high.
      For comparison, Haas Avocados are 167 Cals, 15.4 grams total fat, 2.1 grams saturate fat per 100 gram serving which comes to 11% of calories from SF so more total fat, but a lower SF as a total percentage of calories.

      My typical SF intake is less than 7 grams per day which comes out to 3% or less of my calories from SF’s. When it comes to these kinds of things, I listen to my body. I feel just fine after eating avocados, but I eat them with other foods. I usually eat durian as a stand alone meal, and I get a food coma afterwards. Durian would probably not do well if it were subjected to the “brachial artery tourniquet test,” and I wouldn’t be surprised if durian caused lipemia which is an abnormally high concentration of emulsified fat in the blood.

      I’d be more concerned with durian’s saturated fat spike not its sugar spike, and for these reasons, it would seem prudent to eat it infrequently or very sparingly.




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    3. Hi Eric. Hi! My name is Dr Renae Thomas and I am one of the medical moderators. If you aren’t sure, you could run an experiment. Have your numbers taken, then stop the durian for three months (without adding other fat sources or changing your diet otherwise) and have them retested. Then you will know for sure if the durian fat is affecting your cholesterol :) It is a high fat food, that would usually be limited in those with CAD.




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      1. Hi Dr Renae!

        Appreciate your excellent tip. Will do that to see if my last lipid numbers(with occasional durian consumption) differs from the next one (w/o durians consumption for 3mths). I would be thrilled if i could drop my TC, LDL & TRIG further & convince my Doc to further cut my Statin Dose to 10mg or do away with it.




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  7. Eric, durian is seasonal. It causes a sugar spike within minutes of consuming. (10-12mmo/litre). But your total cholersterol is good so its fine but watch the sugar spike that could cause other sugar issuess.




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  8. I am 71 years old, 6 foot, quite active for my age, cycling a mile or 2 a day, walking a mile or 2 a day, lift dumbbells 5k in each hand x 80 each day. Sit at the computer quite a lot. Still do strenuous gigs once a fortnight in my blues band. Body in quite good shape, apart from my belly is too big for my own comfort, not enormous, I wear size 34 waist in trousers. I haven’t had alcohol or drugs for over 20 years, but I do have an “addictive personality”. All or nothing type. I have recently stopped all chocolate biscuits and ice-cream, and halved my cheese intake (i was eating half a small packet of choc biscs a day, plus lunchtime cheese and evening ice cream). I now eat a good amount daily, of green vegetables, some wholemeal bread, a bit of cheese, not TOO much, and good balanced fish protein.
    But here is my worry, I used to eat a couple of apples and a banana a day, but I am now eating as much as a whole punnet of strawberries, a whole cantaloupe melon, 3 or 4 bananas, and an apple or 2 EACH day. I know it’s crazy. I have good body functioning and digestion. But I feel I may well be satisfying a fructose craving that will keep my belly too big and firm, even bloated. Do I have your approval to continue this high fruit intake, or should I get sensible one more time? (I know your answer will be the latter!)




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    1. Hi Pete. Glad to hear you have increased your plant-based food intake! Your recommended fruit intake is 2 cups per day. However, with the information you have given me, your activity level is active. So you may get away with eating 3-4 cups of fruit per day.

      The important thing to remember is that fruit contains natural sugars so excess fruit can lead to weight gain. Additionally, you have to be careful not to consume too much fruit as you can exceed the upper limit of vitamins and minerals leading to toxicity issues. Hope that answers your question.




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    1. Thanks for your question.

      Not at all, according to the ACS:

      “Sugar increases calorie intake without providing any of the nutrients that reduce cancer risk. By promoting obesity, a high sugar intake may indirectly increase cancer risk. White (refined) sugar is no different from brown (unrefined) sugar or honey with regard to their effects on body weight or insulin levels. Limiting foods such as cakes, candy, cookies, and sweetened cereals, as well as sugar-sweetened drinks such as soda and sports drinks can help reduce calorie intake.”

      Nevertheless, it’s preferable to eat fruit rather than drink it’s juice.

      Hope this answer helps.




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