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The Role of Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease

In the original description of Parkinson’s disease by none other than Dr. James Parkinson himself, he described a characteristic feature of the disease: constipation, which may precede the diagnosis by many years. In fact, bowel movement frequency may be predictive. Men with less than one bowel movement a day were four times more like likely to develop Parkinson’s an average of 12 years later. This could be simply a really early symptom of the disease tied to decreased water intake, however. Many Parkinson’s patients report never really feeling very thirsty, and perhaps that led to the constipation. “Alternately, one may speculate that constipation also increases the risk of Parkinson’s disease as constipation results in a longer stay of the feces in the bowel and thus more absorption of neurotoxicants,” neurotoxins from the diet.

Two studies suggest an association between constipation and Parkinson’s, but, at the same time, 38 studies link the disease to pesticide exposure and by now more than 100 studies link pesticides to an increased risk of up to 80 percent.

Many of these studies are on occupational exposure, like that experienced by farmworkers, who may reduce their risk of Parkinson’s by wearing gloves and washing their clothes, but Parkinson’s has also been linked to ambient exposure. In the United States where approximately a billion pounds of pesticides are applied annually, just living or working in high-spray areas may increase Parkinson’s risk. It’s the same with using pesticides in the home. I didn’t realize how common household pesticide use was, and a study out of UCLA suggests it might not be such a good idea. 

Pesticides may cause DNA mutations that increase susceptibility for Parkinson’s or play a more direct role. Many neurodegenerative diseases appear to be caused by the buildup of misfolded proteins. In Alzheimer’s, it’s the protein amyloid beta; in Creutzfeldt-Jakob and mad cow disease, it’s prions; in Huntington’s, it’s a different protein; and in Parkinson’s disease, it’s a protein called alpha synuclein. A variety of pesticides—8 out of the 12 tested by researchers—were able to trigger synuclein accumulation in human nerve cells, at least in a petri dish, though the study has since been retracted so it’s unclear what the data actually showed.

The buildup of synuclein may play a role in killing off specialized nerve cells in the brain, 70 percent of which may be gone by the time the first symptoms arise. Pesticides are so good at killing these neurons that researchers use them to try to recreate Parkinson’s disease in animals. Is there any way to stop the process? As of this writing, there aren’t yet any drugs that can prevent this protein aggregation. What about flavonoid phytonutrients, natural compounds found in certain fruits and vegetables? Flavonoids can cross the blood-brain barrier and may have neuroprotective effects, so researchers tested 48 different plant compounds to see if any could stop the clumping of synuclein proteins into the little fibers that clog up the cell. And, indeed, they found a variety of flavonoids that can not only inhibit the spider web-like formation of synuclein fibers, but some could even break them up. It turns out flavonoids may actually bind to synuclein proteins and stabilize them.

In my video Berries vs. Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease, you can see healthy nerve cells and the neurites, the arms they use to communicate to one another. After exposure to a pesticide, however, you can see how the cell is damaged and the arms are retracted. But, if you first incubate the nerve cells with a blueberry extract, the nerve cell appears better able to withstand the pesticide effects. So, this implies that flavonoids in our diet may be combating Parkinson’s disease as we speak, and healthy diets may be effective in preventing and even treating the disorder. However, these were all petri dish experiments in a laboratory. Is there any evidence that people eating berries are protected from Parkinson’s?

A study published quite a long time ago suggested the consumption of blueberries and strawberries was protective, but it was a tiny study and its results were not statistically significant. Nevertheless, that was the best we had…until now. In a more recent study, those eating a variety of phytonutrients were less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. Specifically, higher intake of berries was associated with significantly lower risk. The accompanying editorial, “An Apple a Day to Prevent Parkinson Disease,” concluded that more research is necessary, but, until then, “an apple a day might be a good idea.” Of course, that’s coming from a man. Apples appeared protective against Parkinson’s for men, but not women. However, everyone appeared to benefit from the berries.

We may not want to have our berries with cream, though, as milk may be contaminated with the same kind of neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims.


I’ve produced other videos on Parkinson’s disease, including: 

Learn about other neurological muscular disorders, including essential tremor and ALS:

The same reason Parkinson’s may be related to constipation may also explain the breast cancer connection. For more on this, see my video Breast Cancer and Constipation.

What else can berries do?

But what about all the sugar in fruit? See my videos If Fructose Is Bad, What About Fruit? and How Much Fruit Is Too Much?.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Discuss

Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.


80 responses to “The Role of Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease

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  1. I live abroad in a country where blueberries, raspberries, cranberries and other berries do not grow and are not available fresh. Strawberries are available for only a few months a year.
    What can you suggest eating instead? Do dried cranberries (readily available) or frozen berries (sometimes available) contain phytonutrients in useful amounts? Or does anything else that doesn’t have “berry” in the name?

    1. I would say: Do your best to eat the most colorful diet possible. A great big YES, to any berries.

      They did say that a wide range of phytonutrients, so you can either walk around looking for colorful fruit and vegetables or start learning about phytonutrients.

      Flavanone foods: oranges (120 g), grapefruit (80 g), fruit juice (160 g);
      Anthocyanin foods: berries (100 g), pears (170 g), grapes (80 g), wine (125 mL)
      Flavonol foods: pears (170 g), tea (260 mL), onions (60 g)
      Flavone foods: wine (125 mL), oranges (120 g), peppers (80 g)
      Proanthocyanidin foods: apples (100 g) cocoa (260 mL)

      Tea (260 mL) contributed ≥10% to intakes of total flavonoids, flavan-3-ols, and polymers

      Antioxidants: broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, tomatoes, corn, carrots, mangos, sweet potatoes, soybeans, cantaloupe, oranges, spinach, nuts, lettuce, celery, liver, fish oil, seeds, grains, kale, beets, red peppers, potatoes, blueberries, strawberries, and black and green tea.

      Carotenoids: carrots, yams, cantaloupe, squash, and apricots

      Sulfides: garlic and onions

    2. Dried cranberries are often loaded with vegetable oil and preservatives. Frozen berries contain the same, and often more, phytonutrients.

    3. In the frozen food section, you will find all sorts of frozen berries like blueberries, readily available. They are usually used for cakes, but you can eat them at breakfast. Here is my recipe: 2 tablespoons of oats (not a lot of oats), 1 tablespoon of ground flak seeds, a cup of mixed frozen berries.

      Microwave for 1,5 to 2 minutes, add a banana. Cut half the banana smash it and mix it in, then half a tablespoon of some sort of jam, I like blueberry jam. Then the other banana half sliced on top.

      Tastes like dessert and takes 5 minutes to prepare or less, can be done overnight and left in the fridge and in the morning you only have to microwave it.

    4. Hi Eve,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

      I’m not sure where you live, but any edible berries at all that you can find their, whether fresh or frozen, would be a very rich source of phytonutrients. Really, any fruit and vegetable contains a fairly large amount of phytonutrients. As I believe somebody already mentioned, typically, the darker the fruit or vegetable, the more antioxidants and phytonutrients will be present in the food.

      As Dr. Greger shares here (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/antioxidants-in-a-pinch/), herbs and spices can add antioxidants (through phytonutrients) to your diet in dramatic fashion! Beans, nuts, and seeds can boost antioxidant and phytonutrient intake as well.

      Thanks again for your question, and I hope this helps answer it!

  2. We may not want to have our berries with cream, though, as milk may be contaminated with the same kind of neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims.
    ————————————————————————————————————————
    I personally would have left this last sentence off. There are tens of thousands of references against milk on NF.o… a re-inforcement of that belief just seems like lobbying.

    1. Lonie,

      I respectfully disagree.

      When I first came here, I had such brain problems and wanted to start drinking Matcha to help my brain, but I was drinking it with milk and I also drank coffee with milk and milk took away the benefits of those things. I needed to know things like that.

      I will tell you that I started eating blueberries and then, one night, for a “treat” I added some plant-based whipped cream, and there are multiple types, but I suddenly started remembering that I needed to look up the plant-milks and coconut milk had saturated fats and with soy milk I had to watch how many servings to not raise my IGF-1 and it might ruin the effects of the blueberries.

      I had to go back to pairing the blueberries with other fruits.

      I like them best with grapes, but organic grapes are out of season. Simple decisions are complicated problems and I appreciate all of the help Dr. Greger gives.

      1. Plus, it was a neutral sentence about milk containing neurotoxic pesticide residues.

        That is not lobbying at all.

        That is giving the same types of information he always gives.

        There are people who lobby. I was recently reading about Lumbrokinase and every page I tried to read was a sales pitch. I have been interested in Serratiopeptidase and Serrapeptase and Nattokinase for amyloid degradation.

        The research end of things is a little over my head, but when I come back to the doctors’ sites and other websites, I end up getting sales pitches rather than information.

        Neutral sentences of risk are not what I consider lobbying.

        1. Deb, as Dommy suggested in his post, organic is pesticide free. Dr. Greger’s post suggests that all milk “may” be contaminated with pesticides. I have no problem if he wants to say “Personally, I’m against milk consumption.”

          But when he plays the fear card that all milk may have pesticide contamination, that just causes me personally to wonder if all his postings are based on spreading fear… rather than his probable intended goal of offering another line of thinking.

          1. Lonie,

            To me, the keywords were “may be” with a link attached, followed by “found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims” making it something people who are trying to avoid Parkinson’s may want to consider.

            My other grandmother had movement issues which looked like Parkinson’s. She didn’t speak English and she died of cancer a long time ago, so I don’t know how to evaluate whether I have a genetic predisposition to Parkinson’s or not, and I do not know what caused things like hallucinations within me but Parkinson’s is on my list.

            To me, anyone who has Parkinson’s or who had relatives who had Parkinson’s will want to know that milk might be a source of the neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of people with Parkinson’s.

            I used to drink to easily drink 32 ounces or more of milk per day. Milk just got added to the list of “What might have happened to my brain” and as I keep going down the list and correcting everything, my brain is slowly getting better.

            1. If he hadn’t said that sentence, I wouldn’t know that milk could be associated with Parkinson’s.

              Other people who are around me have it and them coming off of RoundUp would be one thing I would recommend, but if he hadn’t put that sentence, I wouldn’t know to tell them that milk could have contributed.

              1. Lonie,

                If he ever starts just saying, “Personally, I am against….”

                That will be when I start suggesting sentences like

                “… milk may be contaminated with the same kind of neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims.”

                I do not want him doing personal preferences. I want him to put links to studies.

            1. >>>>>>This is false. Where do people get that idea?
              ———————————————————————-
              I guess from the list at your link that says Vitamin D3: As a rodencide is a pesticide.

              Sure you can quibble over definitions but I think the general public understands that organic is free of synthetic concoctions that are suspected or proven to be unhealthy.

          2. Lonie

            Let me guess, you consume organic dairy products and therefore they couldn’t possibly be unhealthy or contain persticide resideues? And even if they are/do, you don’t want to hear about it?

            Let’s remember here that farmers are allowed to give their dairy cattle feed produced using organic pesticides.

            Also, Greger doesn’t just make up ‘facts” (like many of the alternative health crowd. If he wrote that organic milk may contain pesticides, I am sure that he has a good basus for saying that.

            ‘The USDA didn’t comprehensively test conventional against organic milk. However, 10 of the 739 samples were labeled organic — and “just like virtually all samples, all 10 samples contained DPA and nine had DDE residues,” the Organic Center reports’
            https://grist.org/article/got-chemical-and-pesticide-residues-in-your-milk/

            I think Greger is perfectly correct to warn against consuming cream with berries. There may be other stuff about dairy products on this site but some people may come to this page purely for the Parkinson’s information. There are health risks associated with consuming full fat dairy products like cream and while organic may be less unhealthy than non-organic, that doesn’t automatically equate to ‘healthy’. They are entitled to be told about these risks.

            Closing our own eyes to the facts is one thing but trying to prevent other people from being aware of these things is something else.

            It reminds me of all the pot enthusiasts becoming irate when he dared refer to research that suggested that marijuana may not be a universal panacea. And his referring to major assessments of the evidence on eg wi-fi radiation, apparently must mean that he’s a paid shill for the telecommunications industry. Not to mention the fact that he never mentions the huge health benefits delivered by organic red meat cooked at low tempaeratures. That too is clear evidence of bias. Obviously.

            1. Let me guess, you consume organic dairy products and therefore they couldn’t possibly be unhealthy or contain (sic) persticide resideues? And even if they are/do, you don’t want to hear about it?
              —————————————————————————————————————
              Tom, guessing is something you should try to improve or better yet, give it up because, and pardon me for stating it so frankly… you suck at it.

              You are also deficient in the understanding dept. Otherwise you would have realized I wasn’t defending milk… haven’t done that food for quite some time now.

              I agree you can possibly find something even in organic milk if you test thoroughly enough… same goes for air but I’m not going to stop breathing it out of fear. If the air impurity content is severe enough I’m going to look for cleaner air. But a blanket “Air may have stuff in it… shut your mouth!” fear-mongering statement isn’t sending me ducking for cover.

              I’ve read the posts and realize that there are people on the comments section who are easily manipulated by fear and if they are suffering from something bad, that’s perfectly understandable. But I think the majority here are thinking folk who prefer hard facts or even anecdotal stories over innuendo to help them improve their health.

              Again, your attempt to paint me as a milk-loving anti-health lobbyist exposes the lengths you will go to in order to protect your idol.

              And if you succeed in this calumny, you will give Dr. Greger no reason to see my context in its true light… trying to get him to treat his followers as equals rather than village idiots who are easily manipulated by tactics.

              1. That sums up the problem I had with your comments Lonie .. ‘trying to get him to treat his followers as equals rather than village idiots who are easily manipulated by tactics.’

                How on earth is pointing out a simple fact (organic milk has been found to contain pesticide residues) in a video about pesticides, treating people as ‘village idiots’?

                Why is he required to stay silent about organic dairy when talking about pesticides and berries? After all, strawberries and cream is pretty much a cliche isn’t it? It’s an entirely natural connection to make, which is why your comment baffles me if you aren’t a fan of organic dairy.

                And I don’t have an idol. Nor do I agree with Dr Greger on everything – I think that some of his videos/assessments of conventional cancer care are mistaken. Nonetheless, I believe that he sticks closely to what the published scientific evidence shows and that his assessments are almost entirely consistent with the latest mainstream nutritional advice.

                1. How on earth is pointing out a simple fact (organic milk has been found to contain pesticide residues) in a video about pesticides, treating people as ‘village idiots’?
                  ———————————————————————————————————–
                  It’s the context to how you say it.You have to take into consideration that not everyone who comes to this website is WFPB or Vegan.

                  Unintended consequences could be someone here who does drink organic milk. Then they read that it has chemicals same as pasteurized milk… and “maybe” they say “Well, if organic isn’t better I’ll just drink the cheaper milk.” Yes, you may have succeeded in putting the “fear from the Greger” in them, but their reaction to that fear isn’t controlled.
                  ______________________________________
                  … And I don’t have an idol. Nor do I agree with Dr Greger on everything…
                  ———————————————————————————————-
                  Of course not. Any cutthroat debater knows you have to give a small amount of agreement so the audience doesn’t notice when you stick the knife in. But I bet if we had an algorithm that could tease out the bent of your posts, it would show you defending Greger 90+ percent of the time… maybe challenging him 1% of the time. Perhaps there is a formula for idolatry that says you have to agree 100% of the time… I don’t know so maybe I’m wrong and he is not technically your idol. (Not sayin’ that’s a bad thing… even non-believers need SOMETHING to believe in. ‘-)

                  1. Sure I defend Greger most of the time. That’s because I think most of the time he is right. The criticisms I see of him here are usually either mistaken about the facts, crackpot (conspiracy theories etc) or plain stupid – such as the evidence he cites doesn’t agree with my personal opinions so he shouldn’t even mention it.

                    Your criticism is right up there with them. In a video about pesticides, Parkinson’s and berries, he says that even organic cream (usually consumed with berries) may contain pesticide residues. That’s completely relevant, yet you think he shouldn’t mention it because …. what, people may give up eating organic in favour of conventional.cream? So, he should hide the facts because people might make choices that you don’t like?

                    And accusing me of ‘idolatry’ is just a mildly insulting way of saying I agree with him most of the time and not you. It’s just a cheap high school debating ploy.

              2. Lonie,

                Your comment “I agree you can possibly find something even in organic milk if you test thoroughly enough… same goes for air but I’m not going to stop breathing it out of fear“ is a straw man argument. Interesting.

                You equate breathing air with drinking milk. The two are not equivalent. Air is necessary to life; milk isn’t. Also, I can’t control what air I breath, but I can control what beverages I drink. And I don’t drink milk. For a myriad of reasons.

                But also, why do you conclude that Dr. Greger is fear-mongering when he suggests that we may not want to eat our berries with cream, as milk may be contaminated with the same neurotoxins that are associated with Parkinson”s? I read that as a suggestion, with evidence to support it. That is very different from what I understand fear mongering to be,

                And on what basis do you conclude that Dr. Greger treats his followers as village idiots easily manipulated by tactics? I conclude quite the opposite: his information is based upon nutrition research published in peer reviewed journals, for which he provides links so that we can review his evidence to determine whether or not we agree with his interpretation of the results and his conclusions from them. To me, that’s the opposite of treating us like village idiots.

                1. Dr J., thanks for responding since Tom is still probably in the Philippines and thus on a different night/day schedule.

                  However, I think your remarks are similar to Tom’s and since that is my conclusion, I respectfully ask that you read my response to Tom’s various posts and accept those as my addressing your questions.

                  TIA.

    2. To avoid informing readers of such a critical caveat to the regular addition of berries/flavonoids to their diet would be a dereliction and – in consideration of the vast majority who tend to like their berries with cream or yogurt – just plain bad advice (people who already know everything spare the rest of us their pettiness).

  3. Dr. Gregor: What about the fact that conventional strawberries and apples are in the top 2-3 MOST POISONED fruits in the USA?? Weren’t you just stating that berries have those neuroprotective effects but that pesticides were damaging the neurons?

    1. Dommy,

      Yes, eating conventional seems like a waste of good phytonutrients.

      I will say though that it is good to know that it might be protective for those of us who end up at salad bars with conventional choices.

      The other night, I visited my favorite living 90-year-olds and they offered me apple juice and frozen conventional grapes and told me that the doctor told them not to change anything.

      I thought about T. Colin Campbell saying that we get OCD about things and I thought about it and I am and they aren’t and they are still doing well.

      I just wasn’t sure whether I would faint from my chemical sensitivities or destroy my gut microbiome with RoundUP or contribute to brain problems or not.

      I want to say to T. Colin Campbell, but are you sure because I ate poorly for so many decades and I am in trying to reverse diseases mode and they had their phytonutrients reversing diseases for them all along, so they can afford to just not think about any of it, but I think I have to learn everything because my brain damage and obesity isn’t fully reversed yet.

      1. The other night, I visited my favorite living 90-year-olds … and told me that the doctor told them not to change anything.

        As you implied, this is wrong-headed thinking IMO. Just because we are doing well doesn’t mean we can’t do better.

        Their Dr. seems to think that just because they are 90 means they are “hitting on all 8 cylinders” when in fact they are actually hitting on 8 sludge covered cylinders that could be made to work better by introducing some additive to their fuel consumption.

        1. Lonie,

          They have started to have forgetfulness and, honestly, their sons are starting to examine when it will be time to take their car keys away.

          I agree with you, doing just a little better might keep those keys a little bit longer.

        2. I agree Denise. We should be able to disagree in this forum ‘comfortably’ in conversation. Dr Greger and staff put themselves out there in the public eye at NF and, as professionals, can certainly handle suggestions and feedback from his readership.
          Lonie, did you notice too about the differing results between genders? I have come across this a lot lately in my reading of studies on other topics. Heart disease for example. Diet (or specific elements in a diet) can benefit men greatly and yet not have the same benefit for women. I think I’m going to start collecting these studies in a folder.

          1. Lonie, did you notice too about the differing results between genders? I have come across this a lot lately in my reading of studies on other topics. Heart disease for example. Diet (or specific elements in a diet) can benefit men greatly and yet not have the same benefit for women.
            ————————————————————————
            Went back and read the blog just for that. Probably skimmed over it during first read as I’m on the lucky male side.

            This brought to mind a piece I read somewhere that insisted there is no difference in the male/female brain. I didn’t believe it of course. For the most part anyway, the difference in the way of thinking, leadership, etc. has to be somehow brain related and not just some hormonal thing. I believe the difference in the reaction to apples is acceptable as proof positive of the difference, even if it is a minuscule one.

            The good news is the finding that berries can help both genders… but until some multi-billionaire starts backing the putting of ads and commercials on Social Media and TV about how this simple food act and others can protect the younger generations from these afflictions, good health will remain in the realm of the better informed.

            Govt. won’t do it because it would be construed as taking sides against health providers and food businesses, which would suffer greatly if people ate healthier foods.

            Govt. is supposed to not try to pick winners… just collect our taxes and spend it.

          2. Barb,

            Yes, I have noticed the male and females having different results often.

            I wonder if they have tried upping the dose for women.

  4. It is important to glean information and to share it as well, but we still need to be more tactful of those who are still learning and forming their right to their own decision as to health. Even the Creator gave us the right of Free Will and the Freedom to Believe and make our own Decisions. We need respect for each other.

  5. Hi,

    Not necessarily on topic but related to organic products. I keep waiting for these topics to come up related to this question but they are not and I’m struggling.

    I’m going crazy not being able to confirm that certain companies’ products are safe to purchase. I read for hours, often daily–Thank you awesome NutritionFacts!!!–and also the comments, reviews on other sites, and I hear that one company is safe and the next comment says no they’re not. I’m so overwhelmed that I’m getting confused and upset about these things. I recently moved after caring for my mother and I am wiped out in more ways than one.

    I have been going without nutrients for months because I can’t figure this out. Many thanks in advance, and a recipe at the end to hopefully thank you additionally. I know that everything is supposed to be whole food and I’m trying to get there but I think I need to have some intermediate options.

    Iodine – in case I can’t afford two sheets of organic raw NorI daily (and I’m not even sure how much iodine is in it based on what I’ve read) and the dulse has a California warning, so I’m considering a bottle of supplemental iodine. Who? What type? Can you take a higher amount fewer times per week? (I know selenium is important with it, and I have my required Brazil nuts in the freezer :) )

    Amla – Who has safe Amla?

    Chlorella – Who has safe and bio available?

    Cooked ginger – cooked for how long? I know he said he eats crystallized but then there may be sugar and there’s such a wide range of times for cooking but I’ve had a lot of radiation tests and I want to work on this.

    For most of my frozen vegetables and fruits, I do not cook them after they come out of the freezer, I just thaw them out and use them as is but is frozen spinach, frozen other veggies, and frozen fruits, good substitutes because the raw stuff is very expensive? What about other frozen foods?

    Hibiscus – should it be whole leaf, and who has the safe ones?

    Turmeric – I buy organic powdered but I still for the life of me can’t figure out who I can trust to not have cadmium and/or whatever else in it!

    There’s more but that would be a hell of a start!

    I know some of these topics are in videos or touched on in videos or there are things related but I’ve spent so much time trying to understand these things. We’ve also rescued some abandoned cats and we have so much to catch up on after my absence with my mother. I’m neglecting so many other very important things trying to figure this out there is so much added stress.

    ~~~~~~~~

    Greens Dip recipe

    Adapted from a spinach dip I purchased at The Daily Bread restaurant and store in Miami Florida
    (by the way, if there something sacrilegious in this recipe, please try to be kind, I am worn out)

    Frozen cut greens, thawed 10 – 16 ozs. (I use a variety but search for ones that are cut already) I guess you could use leftover cooked greens

    Tahini 2 – 4 tablespoons (I’ve tried to whittle down the amount ;) )

    Lime or lemon juice to taste (today with 16 ounces + of greens, I used about 2 limes)

    Salt or miso and potassium salt (NoSalt) (optional of course, I promise I’m trying, but as I suspected, I am finding that food is awful without salt! :( )

    Garlic, crushed and aerated (I used two cloves today and can barely taste it but that was what was handy)

    Mix it all together and please enjoy.

    It’s great with many “dippers” but I will admit my favorite is a spoon. :)

    It’s very easy to put this together and I find it’s a great way for me to get lots of greens down the gullet.

    With many thanks and best wishes from me!!

  6. I posted a comment and didn’t see it. I tried posting it two more times and I still don’t see it.

    Can you please tell me why?

    Thank you!!
    Best wishes!!

    1. Had the same thing happen to me yesterday. Finally got around the shunning by replying to one of my own comments to get my point across.

      I don’t think we are being singled out for shunning, but if it were to appear to be to suppress my speech, I think I would move on.

    2. It happens.

      I wasn’t able to comment for a month or something like that.

      I suspect computers make decisions.

      It is still better than when we had to prove over and over again that we aren’t robots.

      It is usually a link that causes it, but yesterday I had it happen with a comment with no links.

    3. Hi Jo,

      Sorry about that! I just approved your comments. Comments are often automatically flagged by the system because they either contain a lot of links, are longer than usual (which was the case of your comments), or contains other text that is abnormal in comments, such as typos or something like ‘) as an example. This is mostly an effort to reduce spam, which we unfortunately get a lot of, but we always try and approve legitimate comments when we catch them. Thanks for your support!

  7. I have been watching “Interconnected” the documentary about the gut microbiome and they were discussing “food allergy” and I just realized that I might have had a leaky gut.

    A doctor described it as a person starts off allergic to something like meat and pretty soon they are going to the allergist and finding out that you are allergic to everything you eat and he said something like, “Of course you are. Your body is trying to defend you from everything that has been leaking through your gut.”

    I went through that process.

    Back then, I became allergic to meat, and MSG, and other chemicals, but after a while, I couldn’t eat garlic or onions or beans or cucumbers, etc.

    After a year of WFPB, I can eat all of the vegetables.

  8. Hi,

    Not necessarily on topic but related to organic products. I keep waiting for these topics to come up related to this question but they are not and I’m struggling.

    I’m going crazy not being able to confirm that certain companies’ products are safe to purchase. I read for hours, often daily–Thank you awesome NutritionFacts!!!–and also the comments, reviews on other sites, and I hear that one company is safe and the next comment says no they’re not. I’m so overwhelmed that I’m getting confused and upset about these things. I recently moved after caring for my mother and I am wiped out in more ways than one.

    I have been going without nutrients for months because I can’t figure this out. Many thanks in advance, and a recipe at the end to hopefully thank you additionally. I know that everything is supposed to be whole food and I’m trying to get there but I think I need to have some intermediate options.

    Iodine – in case I can’t afford two sheets of organic raw NorI daily (and I’m not even sure how much iodine is in it based on what I’ve read) and the dulse has a California warning, so I’m considering a bottle of supplemental iodine. Who? What type? Can you take a higher amount fewer times per week? (I know selenium is important with it, and I have my required Brazil nuts in the freezer :) )

    Amla – Who has safe Amla?

    Chlorella – Who has safe and bio available?

    Cooked ginger – cooked for how long? I know he said he eats crystallized but then there may be sugar and there’s such a wide range of times for cooking but I’ve had a lot of radiation tests and I want to work on this.

    For most of my frozen vegetables and fruits, I do not cook them after they come out of the freezer, I just thaw them out and use them as is but is frozen spinach, frozen other veggies, and frozen fruits, good substitutes because the raw stuff is very expensive? What about other frozen foods?

    Hibiscus – should it be whole leaf, and who has the safe ones?

    Turmeric – I buy organic powdered but I still for the life of me can’t figure out who I can trust to not have cadmium and/or whatever else in it!

    There’s more but that would be a hell of a start!

    I know some of these topics are in videos or touched on in videos or there are things related but I’ve spent so much time trying to understand these things. We’ve also rescued some abandoned cats and we have so much to catch up on after my absence with my mother. I’m neglecting so many other very important things trying to figure this out there is so much added stress.

    ~~~~~~~

    I tried posting this before, but maybe it was too long, so if this works, I’d like to post the recipe next

    1. Hibiscus – should it be whole leaf, and who has the safe ones?
      —————————————————————————————
      I trust Ralph at Immortality Tea for the dried flowers.

      I too am anal about some things… like water for instance.

      I brew my Hibiscus in room temp distilled water that has been poured from a glass jug that is fitted with a sticky back magnetic tape all ’round and then further magnetized by placing a powerful quarter sized thick rare earth magnet and with a magnesium rod inserted into the bottom of the cork stopper… for the purpose of adding more Hydrogen to the distilled, magnetized water. ‘-)

      1. with a sticky back magnetic tape all ’round and then further magnetized by placing a powerful quarter sized thick rare earth magnet {on it}

    2. Mountainroseherbs.com 800-879-3337 Call them with any ?’s you have about what they test the product you are interested in for.

  9. Greens Dip recipe

    Adapted from a spinach dip I purchased at The Daily Bread restaurant and store in Miami Florida
    (by the way, if there something sacrilegious in this recipe, please try to be kind, I am worn out)

    Frozen cut greens, thawed 10 – 16 ozs. (I use a variety but search for ones that are cut already) I guess you could use leftover cooked greens

    Tahini 2 – 4 tablespoons (I’ve tried to whittle down the amount ;) )

    Lime or lemon juice to taste (today with 16 ounces + of greens, I used about 2 limes)

    Salt or miso and potassium salt (NoSalt) (optional of course, I promise I’m trying, but as I suspected, I am finding that food is awful without salt! :( )

    Garlic, crushed and aerated (I used two cloves today and can barely taste it but that was what was handy)

    Mix it all together and please enjoy.

    It’s great with many “dippers” but I will admit my favorite is a spoon. :)

    It’s very easy to put this together and I find it’s a great way for me to get lots of greens down the gullet.

    With many thanks and best wishes from me!!

      1. Thanks for the recipe!

        Crushed and aerated is beyond my level of understanding, but it sounds good and it is in line with something I was reading today about sesame seeds having magical properties similar to flax and possibly better. I was happy about that because I have been eating a lot of tahini in hummus.

    1. Sounds like an interesting recipe.
      Many people have to use some salt to stay hydrated, preferably sea salt.
      Only people who are sodium sensitive need to stay away from salt.

      1. I’m upset with myself because when I severely cut back my iodized table salt I forgot to get my iodine elsewhere. :( Not good! So instead, I’m using a lot less iodized salt than before and trying to eat nori more often, while I do my research about getting iodine elsewhere safely. I also got miso but, like sea salt, it doesn’t have enough, if any, iodine.

        tutor4mathandmore@gmail.comRe?

      2. Most people consume far too much salt and need to reduce their sodium consumption.

        https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/salt-reduction
        https://www.cdc.gov/salt/index.htm

        There is always kickback of course from the salt and other industry groups like the meat, dairy and processed food orgnanisations whose products are high in sodium. They like to fund ‘research’ which questions the scientific evidence and to highlight the small number of groups and circumstanc3s where low sodium consumption might be an issue.

  10. …pesticides….everytime you stay at a hotel…how many times do you think the mattress and room have been sprayed for bed bugs….forget bout home exposure…

    1. James,

      I think about that type of thing nowadays when I travel.

      When I was young, I stayed at hostels and they made people bring a sheet sack. Seems like it was that.

  11. Maybe I am doing something wrong here. I don’t worry about endless streams of minutae . I eat whole foods, (fresh, a bit frozen, and a few things canned/dried)I take B12, and vit D, and that’s it. Nothing complicated. And we enjoy getting outside every day. I take my cue for vit D from Dr Greger who moved from the north-east to arizona…. can’t get sunnier than that!

    To read up on vegan nutrient issues, this website is great too
    https://veganhealth.org/

    1. Barb,

      That sounds good.

      There still is a lot of ways to go wrong.

      Some people just eat potatoes.

      For months at a time, I never eat grains. Does it matter?

      Does it matter which plant milk I buy?

      Does it matter that I probably do go for months without thinking about omega 3’s or iodine? I finally ate flaxseeds 2 days in a row.

      Does it matter if I eat from a salad bar which isn’t organic for lunch every day? Is once a week or once a month okay?

      Is it okay to not eat fruit or to eat nuts?

      I could eat no grains for 6 months and then just rice for a few weeks and then Amy’s nondairy bean burritos.

      That is where the minutiae comes from.

        1. I have been eating my veggie wraps for a month or two, I think.

          I did stop eating flax, but started again yesterday.

          Sesame seeds might have saved the day.

          I switched to oat plant milk and started drinking coffee again for the first time in over a year. Not sure if the pods are good or bad.

          Constant information to figure out.

          1. Deb, from the things you have shared about the types of things you eat, I think you are doing awesome.. seriously! The fact that you even show up at a salad bar every day is a minor miracle in itself. And I bet you remember Dr G’s salad bar video when you are there!
            Part of the recipe for success with wfpb eating imo, is building meals you enjoy. Let’s face it – if we don’t love it, we aren’t going to stick with it for long, nutritious or not.

            Breakfasts are a challenge for you with the morning rush of getting ready for work. I hear ya. And flax has zero appeal most days for me too. So here is what we do. The night before, in a pyrex glass container, mash a banana, 1 to 2 tbsp chia seed together. Add 2/3 cup rolled oats, 2/3 cup soy or almond milk, 1/4 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tbsp ground flax if you want, mix with a fork, cover and refrigerate til morning. I get 2 servings out of this. I have fruit on the side sometimes. Fast good food for the mornings.
            When I do have a lazy morning I cook oat bran with some water and 1 tbsp flax , ground, for a few minutes. I eat it with some plant milk.

      1. My husband posted Dr Greger’s Daily Dozen (there were attractive posters available too for a while from NF) up on the side of the refridgerator. We just eat off the list, except nuts… though the flax (chia and hemp too) is fine. No prepared packaged foods except plant milks. I have not given any thought to omegas or iodine (doctor said no iodine!).

        We also decided to get a check up and blood tests done at the beginning to have a baseline reference.

    2. Barb,

      That’s the way we eat, too. I refer to it as eating plant based whole foods— meaning skip animal products and processed foods as much as possible. Eat veggies and fruits, beans and whole grains, and nuts and seeds in moderation. Take B12 and possibly D3 supplements. And enjoy!!

      I don’t think nutrition science is sufficiently rigorous to worry too much about the minutiae. I consider it to be more broad brush strokes at this time.

      And health risks don’t go to 100% or 0%; they tend to increase or decrease. So I don’t sweat the details.

  12. I think I am explaining it wrong.

    I had not eaten one piece of fruit for possibly a few decades.

    I had not eaten oatmeal since I was a kid.

    I didn’t really eat vegetables.

    I would never for the rest of my life have eaten blueberries. Any berries, broccoli, cauliflower, pomegranate seeds, matcha tea, any tea.

    I never had kale and only had cabbage on St Patrick’s Day and hadn’t eaten a beet in 20 years. I would never have eaten any seeds and hated walnuts and avocado and oatmeal.

    I drank so much milk and ate mounds of cheese and chocolate anything all day long. Pizza multiple times per week and pasta when I wasn’t eating pizza. Mushrooms and tomatoes were the vegetable I ate because of the pizza. Just tomato with the pasta.

    Minutiae is what changed that.

    I would not ever had broccoli ever and haven’t had that since I was a child. I still won’t eat florets, but I eat broccoli sprouts and broccoli slaw every day right now.

    All because the minutiae captured my heart.

    Or was that Dr Greger?

    Maybe both.

  13. A young man who works for me only eats pizza, pasta and chicken.

    That is it. With 2 bags of potato chips and a little candy every day.

    He drinks liters of soda every day.

    I look at him and think,”Thst was me, except I was allergic to chicken.

    1. Most of the other people around me would add in hamburgers.

      I ate Mac and cheese as one thing I ate multiple times per week.

      Lasagna
      Pizza
      Gnocchi
      Baked ziti

      I ate more chocolate than my young person and fewer chips. Ice cream was my favorite.

  14. Wow! ok, so, I am even more in awe of where you are today Deb! All I am suggesting is, if you can get get breakfast down to a healthy trouble-free and yummy meal that you enjoy, you’ve made even more progress. The overnight oats thing really IS good. Eating real food doesn’t have to feel like punishment LOL
    Your wraps sound delicious. Sometimes for supper I just have steamed broccoli and baked yams or winter squash with cranberry sauce or salsa. Sliced banana and mango for dessert. Simple.

    1. Simple works for me.

      Working on breakfast.

      It is hard to eat breakfast when you don’t sleep.

      I am back to not sleeping.

      I lost it when I gave my PEMF to my carpenter.

      Working on that, too, but today is the first time I am going to bed at 4:30 since I tried the PEMF.

      That is such progress.

  15. My brain feels so much better today, even though I didn’t sleep last night.

    I feel so lucid.

    I am using the ICES PEMF, but I also just over the past week went back to the 5000 IU Vitamin D with Iodine and I bought Brazil nuts and I have been drinking coffee and switched from my oops of coconut plant milk to oat milk.

    Wow, what a difference.

    Not sure which thing is doing it.

    1. Oh yeah, plus oatmeal and flaxseeds and cacao and walnuts for the past 3 days.

      Something just changed my brain further.

      The ICES, plus broccoli sprouts and beets and kale already were changing it.

      I don’t have social anxiety anymore and I had so much of it.

      I am only doing the Brain Gauge once per week, but I feel like I could nail it tonight.

  16. My night driving Vision is improving, too.

    I was low in D and totally forgot Iodine and selenium and flaxseed and cacao and nuts and omega 3’s.

    I didn’t get blinded by oncoming headlights.

    I bought omega 3’s tonight.

    I also bought some NT Factor and PS and Serratiopeptidase. Not sure whether those are a good idea, but I have had such a big breakthrough that I feel like I am getting somewhere.

    I am going to visit someone else with my newfound lack of social anxiety.

    Everybody has been so happy to see me and my recently visited relatives kept saying it.

    Nobody has blackballed me at all.

    Hooray.

    Breakthroughs are so good!

  17. Today is a beautiful sunny day.

    I went to the walking paths without my dog.

    I am still wearing my Winter coat, but the sun filtered between every Spring leaf and I feel so alive just looking at the sunlight between the shadows.

    It is pretty breezy and I am already too cold and didn’t get any real Vitamin D, but I celebrated life and wanted to share how glorious it all was with someone.

  18. Anyone here listening to this morning’s Howard Garret, the Plant Dr. radio show? I haven’t caught the whole program but he has been bustin’ on Roundup. Was surprised to learn Roundup was originally invented as a de-scaler. Apparently someone threw some of it out back on a patch of weeds and the weeds died.

    He also said that there is a pathway that plants have that humans and other animals do not have. This is what allows the plant to kill plants. This is also one of the arguments that Monsanto and even the EPA are likely using to not outlaw the product. Howard says the problem is not the short term to death (unless someone just goes to extremes with its use) but says there is a problem over time.

  19. Lonie,

    “Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide, meaning it will kill most plants. It prevents the plants from making certain proteins that are needed for plant growth. Glyphosate stops a specific enzyme pathway, the shikimic acid pathway. The shikimic acid pathway is necessary for plants and some microorganisms.” http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/glyphogen.html#howwork

    However, glyphosate is not applied to plants by itself, but as part of a formulation, which contains several different kind of “inactive” — but not necessarily safe — chemicals, which probably include emulsifiers, dispersants, “stickers” (causing the glyphosphate to “stick” to the plant surface), and penetrants (to help the glyphosphate enter into the plant). I think that there is some evidence that at least some of these inactive ingredients might be dangerous, or unhealthy. And similar formulations are used for most biocides, which include herbicides and pesticides.

  20. However, glyphosate is not applied to plants by itself, but as part of a formulation, which contains several different kind of “inactive” — but not necessarily safe — chemicals, which probably include emulsifiers, dispersants, “stickers” (causing the glyphosphate to “stick” to the plant surface), and penetrants (to help the glyphosphate enter into the plant). I think that there is some evidence that at least some of these inactive ingredients might be dangerous, or unhealthy.
    —————————————————————————————————
    Yes, I’m certainly familiar with stickers (emusifiers) as they allow the chemical to stay on the surface long enough for the glyphosate (or even spray-on fertilizer) to then penetrate the leaf and enter the system.

    And while you may be right that some of the commercial stickers may be unhealthy, Roundup adds its own to its product. But in the case you are using a mixture of say Vinegar water and Epson Salts (to just kill the above ground part of the plant) just add some dishwashing soap to the concoction and voilà! you have your sticker solution.

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