Berries vs. Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease

Berries vs. Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease
5 (100%) 9 votes

Berries counteract the neurotoxic effects of pesticides in vitro, potentially explaining why berry consumption is associated with lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

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In the original description of Parkinson’s disease, by none other than Dr. James Parkinson himself, he described a characteristic feature of the disease: constipation—torpid or lethargic bowels, which may precede the diagnosis by many years. In fact, bowel movement frequency may be predictive. Men with less than daily bowel movements were four times more likely to develop Parkinson’s an average of 12 years later. Now, this could just be a really early symptom of the disease, tied to decreased water intake. Many Parkinson’s patients report never really feeling very thirsty; maybe that led to the constipation. Or, alternately, the constipation may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease, as constipation results in a longer stay of the waste in the bowel, and, thus, more absorption of potential neurotoxicants—neurotoxins from the diet.

Yes, there are two studies suggesting an association between constipation and Parkinson’s, but at the same time, there are 38 studies linking the disease to pesticide exposure. And, by now, more than a hundred studies linking pesticides to an increased risk of up to 80%.

Now, many of these studies are on occupational exposure—like farmworkers, who may reduce their risk of Parkinson’s by wearing gloves and washing their clothes. But Parkinson’s has also been linked to ambient exposure. Approximately a billion pounds of pesticides are applied annually in the U.S., and just living or working in high-spray areas may increase Parkinson’s risk. And the same with using pesticides in the home. I didn’t realize how common household pesticide use was, but this study out of UCLA suggests it might not be such a good idea.

Pesticides may cause DNA mutations that increase susceptibility for the disease, or play a more direct role. See, many neurodegenerative diseases appear to be caused by the buildup of misfolded proteins. In Alzheimer’s, it’s the protein amyloid beta; in Creutzfeldt–Jakob and Mad Cow disease, it’s prions; in Huntington’s, it’s a different protein; and in Parkinson’s disease, a protein called alpha synuclein, and a variety of pesticides—8 out of the 12 they tested—were able to trigger synuclein accumulation in human nerve cells, at least in a petri dish.

The buildup of synuclein may play a role in killing off specialized nerve cells in the brain—70% of which are gone by the time the first symptoms arise. Pesticides are so good at killing these neurons that pesticides are used to try to recreate Parkinson’s disease in lab animals. Is there any way to stop the process? Well, there’s no drugs yet that can prevent this protein aggregation.

What about flavonoid phytonutrients, natural compounds found in certain fruits and vegetables? They can cross the blood-brain barrier, and may have neuroprotective effects. So, they tested 48 different plant compounds to see if any could stop the clumping of synuclein proteins into the little fibers that clog up the cell. And they found a variety of flavonoids that can not only inhibit the spider web-like formation of synuclein fibers, but some could even break them up. Turns out flavonoids may actually bind to synuclein proteins and stabilize them.

Here’s some healthy brain cells; the arrows are pointing to the neurites, the arms that nerve cells use to communicate with each other. Here’s after exposure to a pesticide, though. The cell is damaged; retracts its little arms. But if you first incubate the nerve cells with a blueberry extract, the nerve cells appear better able to withstand the pesticide effects. So, this implies that flavonoids in our diet may be combating Parkinson’s disease as we speak, and healthy diets may be effective in preventing and even “curing” the disorder.

But these were all petri dish experiments in a laboratory. Is there any evidence that people eating blueberries are protected from Parkinson’s? There was this study, published forever ago, that suggested the consumption of blueberries and strawberries was protective. But this was a tiny study, and the results were not statistically significant—which is why I never brought up the study before. But that was the best we had, until now.

Those eating a variety of phytonutrients were less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease; specifically, higher intake of berries were associated with significantly lower risk. The accompanying editorial, “An Apple a Day to Prevent Parkinson Disease,” concluded that more research is necessary, but until then, an apple a day might be a good idea. Of course, this is coming from a man. Apples appeared to be protective against Parkinson’s for men, but not women. However, everyone appeared to benefit from the berries.

We just may not want to have our berries with cream, as the milk supply may be contaminated with the same kind of neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to DGlodowska via Pixabay.

In the original description of Parkinson’s disease, by none other than Dr. James Parkinson himself, he described a characteristic feature of the disease: constipation—torpid or lethargic bowels, which may precede the diagnosis by many years. In fact, bowel movement frequency may be predictive. Men with less than daily bowel movements were four times more likely to develop Parkinson’s an average of 12 years later. Now, this could just be a really early symptom of the disease, tied to decreased water intake. Many Parkinson’s patients report never really feeling very thirsty; maybe that led to the constipation. Or, alternately, the constipation may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease, as constipation results in a longer stay of the waste in the bowel, and, thus, more absorption of potential neurotoxicants—neurotoxins from the diet.

Yes, there are two studies suggesting an association between constipation and Parkinson’s, but at the same time, there are 38 studies linking the disease to pesticide exposure. And, by now, more than a hundred studies linking pesticides to an increased risk of up to 80%.

Now, many of these studies are on occupational exposure—like farmworkers, who may reduce their risk of Parkinson’s by wearing gloves and washing their clothes. But Parkinson’s has also been linked to ambient exposure. Approximately a billion pounds of pesticides are applied annually in the U.S., and just living or working in high-spray areas may increase Parkinson’s risk. And the same with using pesticides in the home. I didn’t realize how common household pesticide use was, but this study out of UCLA suggests it might not be such a good idea.

Pesticides may cause DNA mutations that increase susceptibility for the disease, or play a more direct role. See, many neurodegenerative diseases appear to be caused by the buildup of misfolded proteins. In Alzheimer’s, it’s the protein amyloid beta; in Creutzfeldt–Jakob and Mad Cow disease, it’s prions; in Huntington’s, it’s a different protein; and in Parkinson’s disease, a protein called alpha synuclein, and a variety of pesticides—8 out of the 12 they tested—were able to trigger synuclein accumulation in human nerve cells, at least in a petri dish.

The buildup of synuclein may play a role in killing off specialized nerve cells in the brain—70% of which are gone by the time the first symptoms arise. Pesticides are so good at killing these neurons that pesticides are used to try to recreate Parkinson’s disease in lab animals. Is there any way to stop the process? Well, there’s no drugs yet that can prevent this protein aggregation.

What about flavonoid phytonutrients, natural compounds found in certain fruits and vegetables? They can cross the blood-brain barrier, and may have neuroprotective effects. So, they tested 48 different plant compounds to see if any could stop the clumping of synuclein proteins into the little fibers that clog up the cell. And they found a variety of flavonoids that can not only inhibit the spider web-like formation of synuclein fibers, but some could even break them up. Turns out flavonoids may actually bind to synuclein proteins and stabilize them.

Here’s some healthy brain cells; the arrows are pointing to the neurites, the arms that nerve cells use to communicate with each other. Here’s after exposure to a pesticide, though. The cell is damaged; retracts its little arms. But if you first incubate the nerve cells with a blueberry extract, the nerve cells appear better able to withstand the pesticide effects. So, this implies that flavonoids in our diet may be combating Parkinson’s disease as we speak, and healthy diets may be effective in preventing and even “curing” the disorder.

But these were all petri dish experiments in a laboratory. Is there any evidence that people eating blueberries are protected from Parkinson’s? There was this study, published forever ago, that suggested the consumption of blueberries and strawberries was protective. But this was a tiny study, and the results were not statistically significant—which is why I never brought up the study before. But that was the best we had, until now.

Those eating a variety of phytonutrients were less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease; specifically, higher intake of berries were associated with significantly lower risk. The accompanying editorial, “An Apple a Day to Prevent Parkinson Disease,” concluded that more research is necessary, but until then, an apple a day might be a good idea. Of course, this is coming from a man. Apples appeared to be protective against Parkinson’s for men, but not women. However, everyone appeared to benefit from the berries.

We just may not want to have our berries with cream, as the milk supply may be contaminated with the same kind of neurotoxic pesticide residues found in the brains of Parkinson’s disease victims.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to DGlodowska via Pixabay.

101 responses to “Berries vs. Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease

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  1. Sorry, I got distracted whilst running around the web looking for a “subscribe window” blocker. UNwanted third-party “traffic” is pretty easy to block, but when the pop-ups are internal to the desired site, it’s not so easy. At least I haven’t found a way. PUHlease anyone who has a good solution (for Linux) let me know.

    Sure it’s no big deal to you, you’re not of the highly distractible mindset then. I am. I might spend three days wasting time trying to eliminate the little popup that refuses to stop, desist, go away, or even burn in Hell. It screws up my train of thought and often I have a difficult time regaining my course. It’s a focus-blowing device and when some of us are highly susceptible to such disruptions and that is why you’ve seen me make remarks regarding these things over and over again.

    Sure, every site has them now, you cannot open a “new” page on any forum anywhere without a “subscribe now/here” box popping up onto the screen. That doesn’t make it any less obnoxious or distracting and I only complain where I am a regular contributing member of the community.

    My breakfast is getting cold now, I’ll go back and finish the video.




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    1. Wade, I definitely empathize with you. I, too, am easily distractible. Do we have ADD? Probably. At least I can’t help wondering about that. It’s a nuisance when you visit a blog and they pop the invitation to join the club, so to speak, before you’ve read a lick of it. Who knows if you want to find it in your inbox every day before you’ve discovered what is there? But, far worse are all the other distracting, moving, text-blocking ads.

      I solved the problem by divorcing Microsoft. My son gave me a Chromebook for Christmas a couple of years ago. It doesn’t have a hard drive. Everything is stored in the Google cloud. Voila! No more virus protection needed. No more pop-ups except for those on the actual website. And I don’t subscribe to the busy ones with pop-up ads. I don’t know if this would work for you, but it has saved me many a frustration (and caused a few others, but not as many as it has saved me from).




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      1. Yeah, but I don’t like the Googlization of everything and avoid the “big G” at every opportunity. I’ve even used “Chromium” which is the Google-less precursor to Google-ized Chrome.

        I’ve been happily cruising the web on a Linux setup for some time now. Only use MS when absolutely necessary (which is rarely, but for photo/video editing it’s difficult to avoid-unless we go “MAC” which I won’t). I’m going to double check some settings of my extant blockers.




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        1. Hey Wade, though we’re straying pretty far off topic here, I just wanted to give you a sympathy vote. As someone who for years avoided most evil empires by being a staunch Linux user and supporter, I started getting old, and when Jobs made the right choice re. slipping BSD Unix underneath MacOS I succumbed and drank the koolaid and am now just another widget controlled by the evil A.




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        2. Wade sorry for the late answer, only now saw your post. Well I never see any popups, years and years. I run Linux as main operating system (Opensuse) but this also works in windows.

          All you need is to use Firefox with the right extensions. I use many for privacy and safety, many people don’t know that adds do more than being annoying, they track you and can be source of malware, also makes browsing slower.

          Get Firefox (you can import your bookmarks from other browsers) here the essential extensions:

          https://adblockplus.org/en/
          https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/adblock-plus-pop-up-addon/?src=search

          “By default, Firefox or Adblock Plus doesn’t block any pop-ups that are
          opened on mouse clicks or other user events. This addon complements
          Adblock Plus with the pop-up blocking functionality.

          There are two ways of getting rid of an unwanted pop-up with this addon:

          Adding
          the pop-up’s url to Adblock Plus’ filters. This will block just the
          individual pop-up (or any other pop-up which matches the pattern you
          decide to write).
          Creating a site rule in this addon’s
          preferences for the opener site. This will prevent the opener site from
          opening pop-ups completely. This is especially useful for sites that
          change their pop-up urls frequently.”
          https://adblockplus.org/en/elemhidehelper
          https://noscript.net/

          https://www.eff.org/privacybadger
          This one is for security also https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere

          Get rid of tracking cookies:

          https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/android/addon/self-destructing-cookies/?src=api
          https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/cookie-monster/?src=api
          https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/betterprivacy/
          http://www.hotcleaner.com/

          This one is unrelated, but makes far easier to manage everything in your browser:

          http://firefox.exxile.net/aios/index.php

          I use several more which makes browsing easier and still more secure, (which I would recommend) would list them if you are interested.




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          1. Yes I run the stuff to block them. These are INTERNAL AGGRAVATING popups that DO NOT CARE that you FREQUENT the site 3 times every day of the week and on the weekends TOO.

            They ask for “sign up” when I’m already signed up and active.

            I changed one setting in ABP and it appeared to work for two weeks but then the SIGN UP “drop down” has started over again here at NF.O.

            Then I spend hours trying to find solutions to block the stupid INTERRUPTER.

            Thanks for your extensive post and suggestions. I’ll work though them to see if I can find anything for relief.

            I have a simple solution when cruising the web and pulling information from dozens of new sources (as I am want to do) and that is CLOSE THE WHOLE WINDOW and don’t even LOOK at the site whose administrators think it’s smart to employ those sorts of tactics. There are usually other good sources of the same information that aren’t so NEEDY!

            I’d like to keep using NutritionFacts.Org, and sharing the videos, and participating in the discussions, but I simply cannot when I’m sent off foaming at the mouth every other time I check in to see the videos and comments.

            I don’t need this in my life. I’m about done. It’s that bad.




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            1. I understand your frustration. I think it’s counterproductive to have those sign up pop that doesn’t want to go away after you have already signed up. I never understand the logic behind the creator of these web sites.




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          2. Also I’ve been reporting it to ABP, with screenshot. I realize that it is internal and not an outside party, hence not really advertising, BUT hoped that they could help.

            What’s weird is that in the screen shot (built into the reporting process, the popups have been visible. This last one (spit cuss) didn’t show. I took a manual screenshot and got it, but somehow ABP didn’t.

            Here’s a shot normal:

            https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/t31.0-8/13738154_10208124522363100_3929371120186247582_o.jpg

            Speak of the son of a bitch, it sprung down behind this screen under the greyed-out NF.O.

            here it is -UNDER- this very conversation.

            https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/t31.0-8/13765919_10208124522843112_4280402076556053718_o.jpg




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            1. Wade I really advise you to try out the extensions I suggest, because I use all that, and thanks to it I don’t suffer any of that.

              Even if you have AddBlockPlus installed you need the Adblock Plus Pop-up Addon https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/adblock-plus-pop-up-addon/?src=search

              To get even more control get the ABP Element Hiding Helper https://adblockplus.org/en/elemhidehelper

              And NOTHING would do a thing in any page if you don’t authorize it first with the NoScript extension https://noscript.net/

              The main focus of that extension is security:

              NoScript’s unique whitelist based pre-emptive script blocking approach
              prevents exploitation of security vulnerabilities (known and even not known yet!)
              with no loss of functionality…

              03/10/2014, Edward Snowden endorses NoScript as a countermeasure against state Surveillance State.

              08/06/2008, “I’d love to see it in there.” (Window Snyder, “Chief Security Something-or-Other” at Mozilla Corp., interviewed by ZDNet about “adding NoScript functionality into the core browser”).

              03/18/2008, “Consider switching to the Firefox Web browser with the NoScript plug-in. NoScript selectively, and non-intrusively, blocks all scripts, plug-ins, and other code on Web pages that could be used to attack your system during visits” (Rich Mogull on TidBITS, Should Mac Users Run Antivirus Software?).

              But also stops all type of annoying scripts. I never run Firefox without it, has been many years.

              With those extensions/addons you’ll have the problem solved.

              (Yet check the rest I suggested in my other post for more control and safety, also to make Firefox easier to use)

              If you have any trouble, or something is not working, tell me.




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          3. See both replies-this is third. Also to all the other nice folks here at NF.O and otherwise, I do realize that it doesn’t bother anyone else. That I’m “over sensitive” to such things. Sorry ’bout that. Accepting this fact helps me mellow out eventually.




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              1. Yeah, well I added two add-ons from you lists of suggestions and they’ve just made life miserable with sign-ins and such. I’ll try No Script again, burdonsome as it was, it was very effective.

                And the EFFing popup here got me again trying to comment.




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                1. Just use Adblock (no Plus) add-on and click on the icon in the top right hand corner of the browser, then click on “Block an ad on this page”. A pop up window will open and you click on the ad you want to block (in this case the sign up popup), then click OK. You repeat it about 3-4 times because there are 3-4 types of signup pop-up and after this, it’s gone for good. Sayonara.

                  Trust me, I block so many signup pop up at several web sites this way.




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                2. Wade if you have trouble signing in any site (because of the blocked popups) in the drop down menu of ABP (Pop-up Addon Options) to disable it right away, you can check it back on or off as needed. It is possible to allow them per site, there is a policy for it, but might only work partially. For example Disqus might give trouble in some sites.




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                  1. I had trouble because I let a cookie destroyer kill my “stay logged in” status and am usually clueless as to my passwords, but am fixing that. Yes I used to use a highly secure PW saver system, but guess what?! I set up a really tough password that I wouldn’t forget or lose. I lost it and forgot it and there’s ABsolutely no way to “reset” a PW at the site I was using. So no I manually do it all again. But now I have a system where they’re all reasonably secure, and different, and I remember them.




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              2. NoScript is BACK!!! To clarify prior comments I made about NS: It wasn’t that burdensome to me, I was fine with it. It was when I tried to get Mom to understand and use it. I had to turn if off on her system. So far it may be the best answer. No intrusions yet. still running around whitelisting.




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                1. I am glad it worked for you, the trick with NS is to just allow the scripts that are needed for a site to work, and no one more.

                  Here I allow the main domain, disqus, disquscdn, ytimg, oneall, and I see I have allowed also pinterest.

                  The list is not complete (of course youtube is allowed) once you set to allow in a site the right scripts, no more trouble.




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          4. Thule: Your answer is very helpful to me! I love Firefox, but have not spent any time exploring the extensions. If you have any more tips, I’d gladly take them. :-) Thanks!!




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            1. Hello Thea, glad you found them useful, if you got NoScript for the first time, you might find it a bit baffling because by default it won’t allow any scripts, so sites will not work completely. But that is the point, just select the addon icon, and allow scripts temporally (one by one if possible) until a site works — one trick, since it is basically impossible to know what scripts might be a bad idea to have running, click in any domain listed in the NoScript list with the middle mouse button (generally in the mouse wheel itself) it will open a page with information about what it is, and the safety record. But many sites just have a lot of scripts that aren’t needed, for a while until you whitelist them in NoScript will be a bit tiresome, but any domains that are allowed will work in every site, after a while you’ll forget that you are using it.

              You gain a lot in safety, I never use Firefox without it.

              Some extensions I use that cannot live without, beyond the ones I listed already.

              https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/image-zoom/
              With this one, you can zoom any image in a page, rightclick in an image and use the scrollwhell to zoom it or out. Also has zoom by context menu.

              https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/perspectives/ Each time you connect to a secure website Perspectives compares the
              site’s certificate with network notary data, and warns if there is a
              mismatch. This way you know if a certificate should be trusted! Using
              Perspectives prevents “man-in-the-middle” attacks, lets you use
              self-signed certificates, and helps you trust that your connections
              really are secure.

              https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/i-dont-care-about-cookies/?src=api The EU regulations require that any website using cookies must get
              user’s permission before installing them. These warnings appear on most
              websites until the visitor agrees with the website’s terms and
              conditions. Imagine how irritating that becomes when you surf
              anonymously or if you delete cookies automatically every time you close
              the browser.

              https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/clickclean/ This one I already listed it in a previous post, but I want to comment how it is useful in sites that stop you from reading after a number of pages (they ask you to subscribe to continue reading) I might not visit the site in months, for example mainstream media sites (newspapers do that a lot) just click the Click&Clean icon, it cleans the browser for all the tracking cookies the site gave you, and reload the page, no more problems. :)

              If you noticed in my previous list I have several extensions to get rid of cookies as I close sites, but with this you don’t need to leave the site, or go to firefox menu to clean all this manually, one click and done.

              Pretty much that it’s, I use this one too, but if you decide to go for it, you might find that you need to disable it often (can be done directly by clicking in its icon in the Firefox bar). https://addons.mozilla.org/en-GB/firefox/addon/clean-links/




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                1. Thank you, Thea. Hope it works for you, what is great about firefox is that is highly configurable. You can make it work pretty much the way you want.

                  I am pretty lost when I need to use other browser.. I find myself trying to do what I do in firefox, when the other browser are pretty much “as it’s”

                  There are some things in chrome/chromiun, but pale in comparison with everything available for firefox, by design no other browser is as configurable.




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        1. You do not have to wait until you can afford a coach. For many years there has been the greatest book available which WILL help you: “Driven to Distraction”, written by 2 Psychiatrists who suffer from ADHD themselves.




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          1. Thanks Antje. I/we read the book back then, it may be around here somewhere. See that doesn’t actively help much. Coaching would. I’ve spoken to one and he’s trying to work up some way to help me/others in a way that we can get started.




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    2. Use Adblock, an add-on to any browser. I have successfully blocked these invitation to subscribe pop up for a while.

      Btw, I don’t understand what the owners of these web sites think but personally, I feel less compelled to subscribe whenever these pop up shows in my face. Furthermore, I don’t understand why these sites do not use cookie to know that I am already a subscriber like with Dr Greger web site?




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      1. I’ve used Adblock and ABP for years, but they don’t prevent “internal” popups in my experience. That is when the popup is NOT third party. I’ll go look again. Sometimes on-site poppings up are necessary navigation tools.




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        1. You probably didn’t use Adblock correctly and I used to make the same kind of mistake. So the signup popup uses a different web technology than the regular pop up and that’s why the popup blocker does not block it. So you have to click on the top right of your browser under Adblock and then click on “Block an ad on this page”. Then you move your mouse over the ad you want to block. In this case it is the signup popup and you click on it. And then it will create a window where you can choose the degree you want to block the ad. Normally the first default is good enough and you hit OK and the popup disappears! Then you refresh the page and likely you see another signup popup again. It’s a different one so you have to do it again. For our beloved Dr Greger web page, I have to do 3 times before there is no more popup. Forever gone :)

          You can use the same method to block web page like Yahoo where a video just yaps at you uninvited. Sometimes you block too much at a web page that you cannot see any video. In that case then you click on Adblock and pause it momentarily while you watch the video and then re enable it again after you are done watching.




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          1. yes thanks for your explanation, but that was not it. I’ve been successfully using ABP and other blocking programs for years. It was an “update” that changed one of my settings. I posted a screen shot around here somewhere.




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      2. Okay, I think I got it now. Had to dig around and find the “non-obtrusive” rule under filter preferences. Testing now.




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      1. Thanks, I looked into that. Appears that I had a good enough setup all along. It’s those blasted “updates” that tend to monkey up the settings.




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      2. This is not a regular pop up and no firewall can stop it. See my instructions above on how to use Adblock. Trust me, I can block anything I don’t like on a page :)




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    1. Hello, I am a volunteer moderator for Nutrition Facts! Sylvain, you ask a great question. One of the reasons why I eat organic berries ONLY is because I learned many years ago that strawberries grown in California are considered one of the most contaminated foods due to the profuse amounts of pesticides (in the form of gas) used to keep out gophers. Gopher gas, I called it – and I began to be much more selective in my choice of fruits. Then, I learned about The Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 – this has informed my preference for organics long before I knew much about phytonutrients!!!




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      1. That makes sense to get berries with as little chemical contamination as possible , however there was no mention of organic berries were being used , so I assume that conventional berries would work as well.




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  2. So, this shows not only that eating berries can lower the risks of gettng Parkinsons by counteracting the neuronal damage caused by pesticide exposure, but also indicates that the risk can be lowered by a diet, eg plant based diet, which averts the duration of exposure to pesticides in the intestines by averting constipation, which increases the exposure. If that is not interesting, I dont know what is…




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      1. Well, to decrease pesticide intake is obviously important (here we see why). Organic food helps to decrease the amount of pesticide intake. Meat as stated wont help, because it increases digestion time and also contains pesticides. GMO food often contains more pesticides than even non-organic plant food, because the genetic manipulation is undertaken to make the plants resistent to the pesticide, so that more/stronger pesticides can be used. Here we have a another aspect of the mayhem caused by the new business model of big agribusinesses. Thats why i became a fan of permaculture, although it’s a bit to hippie-like for my taste…




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        1. Permaculture is great! There are many in permaculture who are Bible-centered preppers too. I am just a suburban dad, so neither of the above. It’s a great way to improve our lives and help the planet as well.




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        1. Lisa, I already ate all organic, non GMO produce. I am asking just a theoretical question :)

          The circumstance is that let say I run out of all fruits and vegetables and I have been eating organic and non-GMO all along. So let say it’s late in the evening and all the health food stores are closed. The only place to buy food is a supermarket which has no organic produce. Should I skip eating fruit and vegetable that day or do I just eat GMO fruit and vegetable for just one day? From Dr Greger video, I think the answer is to eat GMO produce than to not eating, i.e. the benefit outweighs the risk.




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          1. T. Colin Campbell says in “The China Study” that the benefits of eating a whole plant food so heavily outrump the negative effects of any pesticide that it is a nonissue.




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  3. Since you are dabbling in “protein folding” as the cause of the disease, why not go further and talk about the cellular structures that actually do the protein folding properly – HSP’s. Several herbs, especially adaptogens are well established HSP upregulators.




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  4. I wear an insecticide-type product on my clothes every day (the sort that lasts through washings). Otherwise I have dozens of tick bites per week. Since adding the protection, I’ve had less than a dozen bites-in a couple of months. While the compound is supposed to be safe for us to use as directed, I never fully trust such “certification”. But I clearly prefer the drastically reduced rate of tick bites to risking tick-borne disease at every waking moment.

    So until I get out of that line of work, I’ll be exposed to (3-phenoxyphenyl) methyl (+/- cis/trans 3-(2,2-dichloroethenyl) 2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate, a/k/a Permathrin, on a routine basis. I do use the least amount I find effective.




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    1. There are plant-based compounds that can be used as insect repellents (as opposed to insect killers). Citronella is the most famous of these. Vetiver is another. The essential oils of many species of fragrant grasses are natural bug repellents and these grasses are used in organic agriculture. Not sure if these essential oils are effective specifically for ticks. I’ll try to find out.




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      1. I planted Citronella last year, but it failed. I have used tea tree oil to encourage ticks to release their jaws before pulling them. It works great for that. I never had enough TTO on hand to make a repellent concoction. I’ll be more inclined to use such things when I’m not out there 30 hours per week and can be more attentive to personal details. If anyone has an EFFECTIVE recipe for such I’m all ears.

        When I get out to my homestead permanently I’ll be planting all sorts of these anti-bug species for sure.

        The permethrin application is only to my boots and pants. I use less than recommended an only re-apply if ticks start crawling on me again. I don’t treat any upper-body garments or hats. The dried on chemical is supposed to bond with the material and not wash/sweat out. This is very important because some days we are completely drenched in sweat, down to the boots.




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        1. I used to live way out in the country where there were a lot of ticks and other critters like chiggers. I would use powdered sulfur to prevent those critters from jumping onto my clothing. You simply put some powdered sulfur on your socks, shoes, and at the bottom of your pant legs, and they will NEVER get on to you. NEVER ! Some of the ranchers out here would put a little bit of powdered sulfur on the tip of their pocket knife and put it on their tongue and swallow it. I never tried that. But, many of the old timers say that it works good. They say it works good, because they put these sulfur block licks out in the areas where their cattle roam, and the cattle seem to have the good sense to lick these sulfur blocks to get sulfur into their systems which protects them from all kinds of bugs, critters, and insects.




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            1. Damn I must be getting old since I almost forgot about John’s method. When in college I took care of a retired entomologist’s 3 acre estate in Arkansas. I could not go outside without being covered with ticks and chiggers. After suffering a while I found powdered sulfur and a blower in his garage and in desperation used that all over the grounds. It worked better than anything ever tried before or after. Ticks and chiggers were gone, as I recall for at least a year. I think I might try that for mosquitoes as well.




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    2. One out of three black-legged ticks carry Lyme Disease pathogen in our area, so I think it’s a reasonable tradeoff to (carefully!) spray permethrin on work boots (or buy treated clothing) for use in tall grass or brush during tick season.

      Untreated net suits might work, at least during cooler weather–unless spring nymphs are smaller than mesh. (Don’t think so?) We used net suits one extreme mosquito year to mow lawn, walk dog, etc.–“gallinippers” HURT when they bite, plus my son’s face was lumpy from bites after mowing!. Net suits cost ~$25 at amazon.com.




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  5. How about berries with almond milk ? I.e. are typical almond milks pesticide laden (I guess the precise question is are pesticides used extensively re. typical almond ag.). The almond milk I drink doesn’t say it’s made from organically raised almonds (so you can be sure it’s not); I’m wondering if I should I be plunking down the extra dough for almond milk made from organically raised almonds.




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    1. We use unsweetened almond milk from Trader Joe’s. Cheap. They also have good prices on organic almond milk. We do some organic foods – would you believe coffee – and some organic produce – would you believe from Walmart.




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      1. Thanks Jerry; yes, true, some of the big boxes have seen the economic benefits of carrying organic (no doubt a good thing for the organic movement if not all the small farmers). I’ll check out the organic almond milk options at Trader Joe’s.




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  6. People used to get Parkinson’s disease before the invention of pesticides. People back in the 1600’s and before that time used to get Parkinson’s disease. So, there is something else going on besides pesticides. Yes, pesticides can cause it to happen, but, apparently, there are other things that can cause Parkinson’s disease besides pesticides. Perhaps people in ancient times came down with Parkinson’s disease from lack of some kind of nutrient in their diet.




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    1. It is true, there was Parkinson’s disease before pesticides, and some is hereditary. For the rest, the causes are nothing (yet) known. Personally I think that whenever possible it is est to avoid pesticides. For one, if they kill another species they can’t really be good for us. But also, supporting organic farming is not only good for us, it also supports the farms which use less poison and which expose their workers to less of the bad stuff too.




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  7. Multiple System Atrophy is another PD-like disease with folded proteins–prions…. Watching my mom’s decline convinced me that MSA is even worse than PD, which her brother had. Constipation was chronic condition in her family–hopefully I discovered soluble fiber and kefir in time to head off PD! Last I looked metal dust was only association with MSA, and it was weak. Kids no more at risk than general population. Interesting that stress/inflammation + mutation in immune system might factor in PD process. One can see that berries and other good eats could help with that!

    SB Prusiner et al. 2015. Evidence for {alpha}-synuclein prions causing multiple system atrophy in humans with parkinsonism PNAS 2015 ; published ahead of print August 31, 2015, doi:10.1073/pnas.1514475112 . http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/08/27/1514475112.abstract?sid=8d9a3060-414a-4769-805b-410b2a5cc8cf

    Diana
    Matheoud et al. 2016. Parkinson’s Disease-Related Proteins PINK1 and
    Parkin Repress Mitochondrial Antigen Presentation. Cell. Publication
    stage:
    In Press Corrected Proof. DOI:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.05.039




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  8. A heaping big spoonful of dried wild blueberries on my organic oatmeal every day – along with 12 almonds and a half banana.
    Trader Joe’s has nice prices on dried wild blueberries from Maine. BTW, last figures on Maine wild blueberries I saw was 100 million pounds per year, of which 40 million went to Japan. These are very dark blue which is associated with high phytonutrient content unlike the pastel blue from large commercial blueberries. Big Ag has a habit of breeding out the essential nutrients in favor of big size or whatever. And yes the post glacial sandy soil in Maine is ideally suited for wild blueberries which is where the American Indians grew them.




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      1. I eat the Boreal wild blueberries which are sold at TJ but it’s from Canada. I eat the Organic Quick Cooking Steel Cut Oats by Bob’s Red Mill that is sold on Amazon.com. Even though TJ price for oats is inexpensive, Amazon price is cheaper. I have Prime and pay no shipping or otherwise you have to buy above 40 (?) to get free shipping or otherwise the shipping will eat into the saving.




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        1. I almost hate telling you this but wild blueberries are sprayed with pesticides, I still consider them superior and hopefully they are washed off from rains and they are also washed before freezing.




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          1. It’s true that ‘wild blueberries’ are just a variety and in most cases I would guess them to be treated unless stated otherwise. The ones from TJ’s state on the packaging that they are not treated, though they are not certified organic.




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            1. nope , they are wild , somewhat managed though, in other words , nobody planted them , but quite often they are sprayed with pesticides , must be some kind of bug , although picking them in smaller areas that are not sprayed like they are in the commercial areas, I’ve never seen bugs in them.Makes me wonder why they do it. Anyways I imagine thats why they are not certified organic.I would still pick the wild ones over domesticated ones.




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            2. This is a surprise. So I should eat TJ wild blueberries (which is from Maine) instead of TJ Boreal wild blueberries (from Canada). Thanks for the red flag.




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  9. A lot of people use pesticides inside their house. And, of course a lot of people spray around their house also. I am thinking that there are probably pesticides wherever we go. When you go to work, I bet you that some maintenance man has sprayed. When you go into a restaurant, I bet some worker has sprayed. Wherever there is food stored, such as in grocery stores, ware houses, farms, and the such, I bet you, someone is spraying to keep the insects and rodents away. I bet that even a lot of retail shops even spray to keep the cockroaches at bay. How about hospitals, churches, beauty shops, libraries, public schools,……yeah….the list could go on. I think we are more engulfed in pesticides than we have ever really thought about. I stay home a lot. I might leave home maybe once a week to go to the grocery store. Maybe, might reclusive life is a good thing. I’m not afraid to get out. I just like hunkering down at home out here on my one acre in the country. I am thinking that in the future, I might just hire someone to deliver my groceries. Maybe, I could even buy some edible things online and never have to leave home…..period.




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    1. The biggest poison is the weed killer people are spreading on their grass and then sit on the grass for picnic or lay on it for to get sunbath. To kill the weeds, they use Roundup instead of just pulling them out by hand. At my house, I pave my front and backyard with bricks and then grow plants in pots. And I pull my weeds by hand.

      People are eating non GMO and organic produce and then spray pesticides around their house. What’s a contradiction.




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      1. A decent replacement for herbicides:

        1 qt vinegar

        1/4 cup epsom salts

        1 TBS dish soap

        Works best in dry weather and works best for grass…broadleaf stuff not so much.




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        1. I have lots of places where I want to get rid of grass and I refuse to use Roundup, etc. I’ve tried straight vinegar and while that works fairly well on broadleaf stuff, it hasn’t worked great on grass. Thanks for this tip!!!




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          1. Lets say you have a worked garden or lawn as far as that goes. My favorite way is plant buckwheat fairly thick , just when they flower turn under with a tiller then plant grass or garden. Grass or any weed will make a quick retreat with buckwheat in the area , no plant can grow alongside buckwheat .You will be astonished how produce tastes or how good your grass grows after buckwheat . Gardeners can a lot of times plant buckwheat as a cover crop after they harvest their garden if they have about 4 weeks frost free , if you don’t have that much frost free time you can use oats planted really thick which will grow with fairly heavy frosts and then be killed off in places that have winter , makes for very workable spring soils. Another option is fairly thickly planted daikon radish which can be used as a cover crop , really opens up compacted soils and takes very heavy frosts, bonus is you can harvest some of the radishes.
            If you have areas that you do not want anything growing either large areas or spot areas , salt works good , you can even keep your asparagus bed weed free with salt , as they are immune to salt .Arden Andersen book about Science In agriculture is a good read and explains why we have weeds and what is missing in your soils , fairly good book. He is no known relation to me BTW.




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            1. esben andersen: Thanks for these great tips. I’m not into gardening. I’m mostly interested in removing grass from bark-o-mulch areas. However, I really like the idea of planting daikon radish since as you say, you can eat some. I also like your general principal of using plants to control the growth of other plants. I live in the Pacific Northwest. I will have to see which of these ideas can work for me. Thanks.




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              1. oh almost forgot , a propane torch works well, somebody sells one set up for weeding , but can;t recall who, maybe harbor frieght,




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                1. Now that just sounds fun!
                  .
                  Honest question, because I know nothing about these things, but I have lots of visual images: Would a propane torch really be safe to use over a bark-o-mulch area? I think I’ve seen them used to get rid of weeds in the cracks in cements. But over something flammable??? Have you tried it and not burnt down the house? ;-)




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                  1. I don’t want you burning the neighborhood down! lol It would be fairly safe I would think , because you just get the heat near the plant and it;s gone , like less than a second . My partner and I have done acres with torches set up behind a tractor and cultivator . Also used large ones for spot treatments around buildings , works good. I think you can buy fairly small ones too. The smaller the weeds the better it works , the flame doesn’t even need to touch the plant or ground , just close is good.




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                    1. OK. But if you read a story some day about a woman who did burn down the neighborhood, we might have to have another talk. ;-)




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        2. I’ve read that chelated iron is a good broad-leaf herbicide, especially if you have a few dry days after application. I have not tried it myself.




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        3. I have tried this vinegar ‘pesticide’ without much success. Some weeds die and some don’t. The most effective ‘pesticide’ is my hand :) Plus it gives me some exercise.




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  10. It would be interesting to know more about vegan/plant-based nutrition and neurological health and cognition. In this study…

    “Signs of impaired cognitive function in adolescents with marginal cobalamin status.”

    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/72/3/762.long

    …they found that children eating macrobiotic diet before the age of 6 scored worse in cognitive test. In many tests, the macrobiotic subjects with normal cobalamin status performed worse than did the cobalamin-deficient macrobiotic subjects (maybe they were using supplements?).

    So it would be interesting to know how effective B12 supplements are compare to getting enough B12 from animal products and also, how much does lowering homocysteine levels with B12 supplements actually lead to reduced neurological diseases. I hope the will be more studies on this subject especially because of the results in the EPIC Oxford study showing increased mortality from neurological diseases in vegans.

    Thank you in advance if you can find more studies on this subject!




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    1. Interesting. i could see a very small amount of meat , like say 1% of diet could provide B12 without getting adverse effects from such a small amount of meat . It;s possible you won;t see any other replies since this is a very pro vegan plant based site.




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      1. I’m also pro vegan and plant-based but health-wise this is one subject that I think would be interesting to know more of as there seems to be very few big studies. In one Adventist study they found no difference between mortality of non-vegetarians and vegetarians from neurological diseases but I couldn’t find if they compared also vegans and non-vegetarians




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  11. I am looking for an older video where Dr. Gregor ranks different apples according phytonutrient content. I think crab apples were #1 but that’s a very sour apple. I am wondering what is the #1 sweet apple on the video but I cannot find the video anymore. I guess it was taken down?




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      1. That was it!! How did you find it? I typed in apples and looked under apple on the topics and it never came up. So I am going to look into getting an I dared apple tree!!




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  12. This is an excellent video! I have been researching a lot on the Tau Protein, which becomes damaged in the rare disease of Corticobasal Degeneration (which my dad has). Since my dad was exposed to agent orange in the Cold War, is there a link that could be used to prove the connection of his disease to his Agent Orange exposure? I would need to see scientific evidence for the VA case my mom has been building. I’ve also found that phosphorus binds to the Tau Protein, causing it to break. Is there a connection there as well with Agent Orange, phosphorus, and Corticobasal Degeneration?




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  13. Has any research been done on Aronia Berries? Just found out about them this weekend, looking them up said to have 5 times the potency of antioxidants of blueberries and black berries?




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  14. What concerns me is that berries are often grown with pesticides. Would the benefits of the berry outweigh the attached pesticide risks, or is eating organic berries the only truly healthy option?

    Thanks :)




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