Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention?

Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention?
4.86 (97.14%) 7 votes

Eating fiber-containing foods—especially nuts—during adolescence may significantly lower the risk of developing potentially precancerous fibrocystic breast disease (fibroadenomas).

Comenta
Comparte

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The Black Women’s Health Study, which highlighted collards and carrots, was out of Boston University. Across the Charles River, the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study also tried to determine which plants were particularly protective in reducing breast cancer risk, and they identified nuts. 

“The intake of fiber and nuts during adolescence and incidence of proliferative benign breast disease”—such as fibrocystic breast disease; fibroadenomas; noncancerous breast lumps—but, is considered a marker for increased breast cancer risk. Depending on what biopsies show, it could indicate anywhere from 30% to 1,300% greater risk of going on to develop cancer.

Breast cancer can take decades to develop, so they wanted to start early, asking women what their diets were like back in high school. Now in adults, it’s clear, as you can see in this 2012 review: the more fiber you get in your diet, the lower your risk of breast cancer. And, same thing, apparently, when you’re younger. Women who had the most fiber intake during adolescence have a 25% lower risk of this potentially precancerous breast disease.

But, there’s fiber in fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts, seeds—all plant foods. Did any class of plant foods stick out? Nuts were found to be particularly protective. Two servings a week was associated with a 36% lower risk.

But, that raises the question, which type of nuts? Like peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Or, do you have to eat true nuts, like almonds, pecans, walnuts, that sort of thing? Just tree nuts, or peanuts as well? And the answer is: both.

Compared to those who rarely ate nuts, those eating just one or two handfuls a week during high school appeared to drop risk around 30%. “In summary, [their] study observed significant inverse associations between adolescent dietary intake of fiber and nuts and risk of proliferative benign breast disease. Our results provide supportive evidence of the important role of dietary exposures during a unique period in a woman’s life in the earlier stage of breast carcinogenesis [the early stage of breast cancer development]. These findings, if corroborated, may suggest a viable means for breast cancer prevention.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

Images thanks to s58y and Ebelien via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The Black Women’s Health Study, which highlighted collards and carrots, was out of Boston University. Across the Charles River, the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study also tried to determine which plants were particularly protective in reducing breast cancer risk, and they identified nuts. 

“The intake of fiber and nuts during adolescence and incidence of proliferative benign breast disease”—such as fibrocystic breast disease; fibroadenomas; noncancerous breast lumps—but, is considered a marker for increased breast cancer risk. Depending on what biopsies show, it could indicate anywhere from 30% to 1,300% greater risk of going on to develop cancer.

Breast cancer can take decades to develop, so they wanted to start early, asking women what their diets were like back in high school. Now in adults, it’s clear, as you can see in this 2012 review: the more fiber you get in your diet, the lower your risk of breast cancer. And, same thing, apparently, when you’re younger. Women who had the most fiber intake during adolescence have a 25% lower risk of this potentially precancerous breast disease.

But, there’s fiber in fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts, seeds—all plant foods. Did any class of plant foods stick out? Nuts were found to be particularly protective. Two servings a week was associated with a 36% lower risk.

But, that raises the question, which type of nuts? Like peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Or, do you have to eat true nuts, like almonds, pecans, walnuts, that sort of thing? Just tree nuts, or peanuts as well? And the answer is: both.

Compared to those who rarely ate nuts, those eating just one or two handfuls a week during high school appeared to drop risk around 30%. “In summary, [their] study observed significant inverse associations between adolescent dietary intake of fiber and nuts and risk of proliferative benign breast disease. Our results provide supportive evidence of the important role of dietary exposures during a unique period in a woman’s life in the earlier stage of breast carcinogenesis [the early stage of breast cancer development]. These findings, if corroborated, may suggest a viable means for breast cancer prevention.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

 

Images thanks to s58y and Ebelien via flickr

Nota del Doctor

Harvard also found that fiber and nut consumption was associated with a significantly longer lifespan in women. See What Women Should Eat to Live Longer. Soy consumption during adolescence also seems particularly protective; see Why Do Asian Women Have Less Breast Cancer? The reference to the Black Women’s Health Study refers to Preventing Breast Cancer By Any Greens Necessary. What effect might even just a few weeks on a diet full of plants have on breast cancer cell growth? See The Answer to the Pritikin Puzzle. Don’t nuts make you fat, though? You’d be surprised; see Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidence.

Also, check out my associated blog posts for more context: Go Nuts for Breast Cancer Prevention, and Breast Cancer & Alcohol: How Much Is Safe?

If you’re thinking, wait, wasn’t this yesterday’s video? Alas, in 2013 I’m dropping down to new videos only every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; see my email newsletter this morning.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

 

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

Deja una respuesta

Tu correo electrónico no se publicará Los campos obligatorios están marcados *

Pin It en Pinterest

Share This