4.2 from 15 votes
Print Recipe

Berry Chocolate Chia Pudding

Avocado and almond butter add richness to this chocolaty pudding.

Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Difficulty Easy
Makes 4 1/4 cup servings
Daily Dozen Foods Berrries, Nuts and Seeds, Other Fruits
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 165 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/2 ripe Haas avocado
  • 1/4 cup strawberries or blueberries (or other berries of choice)
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cacao powder
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 1/2 cup date syrup
  • 1 1/2 cups almond milk
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • garnish berries, slivered almonds, cacao nibs optional

Instructions

  1. Scoop out the flesh from the avocado and place it in a high-speed blender or food processor. Add the berries, cacao powder, almond butter, Date Syrup, and Almond Milk. Blend until completely smooth and then pour into a bowl. Whisk in the chia seeds until they’re evenly distributed. 

  2. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours. Divide the pudding among four small dessert bowls, garnish as desired, and refrigerate for 20 minutes before serving.

Recipe Notes

Note: Let this pudding sit overnight or at least 8 hours in the fridge before serving. 

Nutrition Facts
Berry Chocolate Chia Pudding
Amount Per Serving (0.25 cup)
Calories 165 Calories from Fat 117
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 13g 20%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 126mg 5%
Potassium 295mg 8%
Total Carbohydrates 11g 4%
Dietary Fiber 7g 28%
Sugars 1g
Protein 5g 10%
Vitamin A 0.7%
Vitamin C 9.5%
Calcium 21.5%
Iron 9.8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Discuss

16 responses to “Berry Chocolate Chia Pudding

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    1. Yes, you can substitute maple syrup for taste, but it is considered it to be an added sugar vs. a whole plant sweetener like date syrup. Whole fruits like dates or bananas are great, healthy sweeteners!




      3
      1. If it were me I’d use whole dates soaked in warm water for about an hour unless you have a really good blender. Blend with or without the soaking water and use in this recipe. You can guess how much then add more date paste if you wish. (1 cup dates to 1 cup hot water).




        0
      2. This recipe comes from The How Not to Die Cookbook, and it includes a recipe for date syrup: dates softened in an equal quantity of boiling water, then blended well.

        Date sugar is another thing that can be bought in health food stores or online. It’s powdered dehydrated whole dates. It’s also used in the cookbook.




        0
    1. @Jo: blended dates will certainly be healthier, but would almost certainly negatively impact the texture of the pudding. Date syrup is not as bad as white/brown sugar and some other sweeteners. I use the brand Biona (UK) and it’s a very good taste and also very sticky/thick which is great as a replacement for the very sticky brown rice syrup that is not recommended due to high arsenic levels.

      If you try the whole dates blended up, report back on how it was :-)




      1
    2. This recipe comes from The How Not to Die Cookbook, and it includes a recipe for date syrup, which is basically date paste so a whole food: dates softened in an equal quantity of boiling water, then blended well. It’s not store-bought date syrup, which wouldn’t be made from whole dates.




      0
  1. I’ve just made this, and although it hasn’t yet set in the fridge, I can tell that it will be very tasty. But…I don’t understand how the ingredients listed in the recipe can result in only 4 x 1/4 cup portions. Surely it will be more than twice that much.




    0
    1. I agree – mine made 8 servings… are the proportions correct? It wasn’t very “chocolate-ty” so I didn’t know if the milk quantity was correct. It did set
      and was tasty though.




      0
  2. I substituted whole dates, and I think it was delicious! Maybe not quite as smooth as it would be with date syrup, but that didn’t bother me one bit.




    0

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