NutritionFacts.org

eggs

Despite the egg industry’s best efforts to put a “healthy” spin (see also here) on egg consumption, eggs contain high levels of cholesterol (see here & here) and may contain carcinogenic retroviruses, toxic pollutants (such as PCB, arsenic, phthalates), and Salmonella (see here and here). Consuming just one egg per day can significantly shorten our lifespan and increase our risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer (such as pancreatic (here too) and breast). Eating a meatless, egg-less, plant-based diet may improve mood, lower the risk of cataracts, neurological diseases, food poisoning, heart disease, diabetes, and even help reverse rheumatoid arthritis. This may be due in part to the arachidonic acid and cholesterol in eggs and the relative lack of antioxidant phytonutrients (see here, here, here, & here).

See also the related blog post: Bad Egg

Topic summary contributed by Elizabeth Stolle.
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Watch videos about eggs

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